The University Honors and Scholars Program (uhsp) coordinates three different academic programs: Harrison Scholars, University



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Tuesday, July 25, 2006

Dear First Year Adviser:


Thank you for agreeing to take on one of the toughest and most important tasks at the University: first year advising. Having completed a supervised practice experience as a first year adviser, I appreciate the work and dedication it requires to provide developmental advising to all of the students in your hall. On behalf of the Honors and Scholars Program, I want to specifically thank you for the support you give to our students in the Harrison, University Honors, and Oxford Scholars Programs.
I currently serve as the Assistant Director for Academic and Co-curricular Support in the University Honors and Scholars Program. In this role, I serve as the Academic Support contact for all students in the Harrison, University Honors, and Oxford Scholars Programs. Students are not required to see me, and I do not replace a student’s academic adviser; however, I do work to ensure that students fulfill their Honors or Scholars requirements and get connected with enriched learning opportunities. On a day-to-day basis, I aid students in selecting Honors or Scholars experiences that fit with their goals and interests; building Honors or Scholars requirements into their majors and educational plans; preparing for and completing a thesis; applying for prestigious scholarships; and identifying research opportunities, internships, and study abroad experiences. I also work with the Honors & Scholars Living Learning Communities and co-curricular programming.
Please know that I am here to help in any way I can. My office is located in the Honors and Scholars Program Office in the basement of Bishop Hall. Feel free to contact me whenever you have questions or need information (day or evening). During the day, I most likely can be reached via my office number at 9-3398. After 5 p.m., I most likely can be reached via my home number at 513-461-1239.
Again, on behalf of the staff in the University Honors and Scholars Program, we thank you and look forward to a wonderful year working with you.

Sincerely,


Kari B. Taylor

Assistant Director for Academic and Co-curricular Support

University Honors and Scholars Program


Overview of the Honors & Scholars Program

Major Program Goals and Philosophy


The Honors & Scholars Program of Miami University fosters a learning environment that enhances students’ and faculty’s intellectual and personal growth and sense of civic responsibility in a multicultural world. Emphasizing scholarship, leadership and service, the H&S Program encompasses three groups of students: Harrison Scholars, University Honors Program students, and Oxford Scholars.
Traditionally, people have conceived of leaders as those persons who use their expertise and abilities to influence, instruct or direct others. Myranda Marsh calls this traditional form of leadership the “follow me” type. People follow this kind of leader because he or she has power over them or is perceived to be superior, thus warranting respect and obedience. However, Miami’s Honors & Scholars Program honors a very different model of intellectual and civic leadership—what we call “citizen scholars.” Citizen scholars are not interested in gaining individual power or acclaim. Rather than being motivated by their personal concerns and agenda, they use their intellectual and scholarly abilities to improve the world around them and to promote the well-being of others. Citizen scholars can come from any social background, have widely ranging educational and personal interests, and have faced vastly different life challenges. Effective citizen scholars must have not only extraordinary intellectual capacities, but they also must be able to relate well with others, and perhaps most importantly, they must cultivate a set of values that are inclusive, empowering, relational and compelling.
Building on the Learning Partnerships Model developed by Marcia B. Baxter Magolda (2004)1, the Honors & Scholars Program aims to develop scholarly and civic leadership in its students by focusing on three dimensions of learning: (1) epistemological (helping students to construct, evaluate, and interpret judgments in light of available evidence and frames of reference); (2) intrapersonal (assisting students to craft an internally generated sense of self); and (3) interpersonal (encouraging them to engage in authentic, interdependent relationships with diverse others).

Program Learning Outcomes


Toward that end, we promote three tenets of development in our program: scholarship (which centers on what Baxter Magolda calls the epistemological dimension), leadership (which centers on the intrapersonal dimension), and service (which centers on the interpersonal dimension). We have also articulated six learning outcomes for our students that align with these three tenets of development:

  1. Construct disciplinary or interdisciplinary knowledge by framing problems, developing arguments, making connections and engaging in responsible research;

  2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of diverse perspectives and cultures;

  3. Communicate effectively orally or in writing;

  4. Reflect self-consciously on one’s own values, learning process or work;

  5. Collaborate with other learners productively and purposefully;

  6. Demonstrate responsible citizenship by putting knowledge into practice for the betterment of society and community.



Developmental Profiles & Program Learning Expectations


In her 19-year longitudinal study, Baxter Magolda also has discovered that undergraduate students typically develop epistemologically, interpersonally and intrapersonally throughout their time at college, following fairly predictable patterns. To help ensure that we are promoting deeper learning, the H&S Program places different expectations on students throughout all four years—expectations that are in keeping with students’ typical patterns of development.

First-Year Student Profile

  • Developmental Level: Environmental factors heavily influence most traditional-age first-year students because these students have not yet developed an internal sense of self. Thus, these students look to authorities such as parents, faculty and staff members, and even the mass media to discover who they should be, what type of relationships they should have, and how they should know. In essence, students remain dependent on others. At this level of development, students lack awareness of their own values and social identities. Those from dominant cultures (e.g., in terms of race, gender, class, and sexual orientation) may remain unaware of their privilege, while those from non-dominant cultures may remain vulnerable to stereotypes.

  • Program Expectations: Introduction to college-level scholarship (close reading, critical analysis, basic research skills; shorter papers, awareness of scholarly resources on campus, interactions with faculty members), leadership (identification of one’s basic values and learning goals), and service (basic understanding of service-learning versus charity, engagement in and reflection on short service projects and cultural enrichment events)

Sophomore & Junior Student Profile

  • Developmental Level: At some point throughout their second or third year, most students discover in some way a personal sense of self that differs from or even outright opposes parental, cultural, and other externally defined expectations. At the moment of this discovery, external and internal forces collide and create a rift between two worlds: one defined by others and one defined by the individual. This awareness of difference compels students to progress to the second major point in the developmental journey—a point where students intensely question and explore their identities, relationships, and ideologies. Through questioning and exploration, students gradually replace external expectations with their own internal ones and begin to make tentative commitments regarding who they are, what type of relationships they want, and how they know. Ultimately, individuals at this point work to reconcile what society tells them with what their
    new-found self wants to say. Clarifying and gaining confidence in both academic and personal goals is an essential part of these middle years.

  • Program Expectations: Engagement in scholarship (undertaking disciplinary research projects, lengthier papers, independent studies, Undergraduate Associates Program, and study abroad; building collegial relationships with faculty members) and scholarly service (engaging in more intensive, semester-long service learning projects, understanding participatory action research, developing a social justice framework), and leadership endeavors (testing out and revising one’s values; rethinking one’s learning goals; participating in student organizations and in recruitment efforts for other Honors students).

Senior Student Profile

  • Developmental Level: At the next developmental point, what student development theorists such as Marcia Baxter Magolda and Robert Kegan term self-authorship, young adults begin to construct their own sense of self. In other words, they choose their values, decide the terms for their relationships, and determine how to judge knowledge claims. They deepen both their personal and social identities. They also make progress toward developing the inner strength necessary to integrate multiple, potentially competing identities and relationships as well as embrace ambiguity and uncertainty. Ultimately, students now have the capacities to demonstrate personal integrity, work interdependently with others, and appreciate multiple perspectives.

  • Program Expectations: Commitment to and reflection on scholarship (completing an honors thesis, offering conference presentations, submitting publications), leadership (reflecting on self as citizen scholar, developing and taking active steps for post-baccalaureate life, identifying models of intellectual leaders, assuming major leadership positions on campus and beyond), and service (envisioning ways to commit to lifelong service, synthesizing the leadership, scholarship and service skills gained in college, developing image of self as citizen scholar).

Overall Trajectory

  • Development: In effect, as we look from the first to the fourth year of students’ journey through college, we see students grow increasingly able and willing to take responsibility for their own learning. A dynamic interplay between a student and his or her social environments (which include educators and peers) never ceases to exist; yet, as each student develops an internal voice, he or she gains the skills necessary to reflect on, critique, and reshape his or her identities, relationships, and ideologies.

  • Program Expectations: As students enter the H&S Program, we expect them to develop a more complex understanding of scholarship, leadership, and service. During their middle years, we expect them to engage in intensive scholarly projects, leadership endeavors, and service activities that challenge them to question and explore their identities, relationships, and ideologies. As students prepare to transition out of college, we expect them to integrate their learning experiences and make commitments in the areas of scholarship, leadership, and service that align with their personal sense of self and belief system.



Descriptions of and Requirements for
Honors & Scholars Academic Programs

The University Honors and Scholars Program (UHSP) coordinates three different but inter-related academic programs: Harrison Scholars, University Honors, and Oxford Scholars. All three have excellent credentials and make valuable contributions to our community.



Harrison Scholars (Approx. 30 first-year students)




  • Receive full-tuition merit scholarship

  • Must maintain at least a 3.5 GPA each year

  • Must fulfill all the requirements for the University Honors Program (see below for more details)



University Honors (Approx. 250 first-year students)




  • Must maintain at least a 3.2 GPA during first and second years

  • Must maintain at least a 3.3 GPA during third and fourth years

  • Must complete a Writing & Cultures Core Course during first year

  • Must make timely progress toward completion of program requirements.

  • To achieve University Honors at graduation:

  • Must complete 10 Honors experiences (at least 7 of which must be “Category A” experiences and at least 2 of which must be “Category B” experiences)*

  • Must achieve a 3.5 or higher cumulative GPA at time of graduation

  • To achieve University Honors with Distinction at graduation

  • Must complete all University Honors requirements (as described above)

  • Must complete a University Honors thesis

*NOTE: This requirement is different than in previous years, so returning FYAs, please pay particular attention to the new specifications.




Oxford Scholars Program (Approx. 600 first-year students)




  • Receive annual scholarship

  • To remain active in the program:

  • Must maintain at least a 3.2 GPA during first and second years

  • Must maintain at least a 3.3 GPA during third and fourth years

  • Must make timely progress toward completion of program requirements

  • To graduate with an Oxford Scholars Certificate:

  • Must complete at least 10 enrichment points (at least 5 of which must be from the "Scholarship" category and at least 5 of which must be from the "Leadership and Service" category)

  • Must achieve a 3.3 or higher cumulative GPA at time of graduation



University Honors Program Audit Standards

The University Honors Program (UHP) completes an audit of each student’s record at the conclusion of each semester. This audit involves both the cumulative GPA in all courses and the completion of Honors experiences, both Category A and B. The purpose of the audit is to make sure the student is making satisfactory progress toward the completion of the UHP requirements. Each student will be placed into one of four categories upon the completion of the audit:




  • In Good Standing – The student meets the GPA, experience, and other progress standards as listed below.

  • Probation – The student does not meet the GPA requirement and is placed on probation for a semester. This semester of probation is provided so the student can raise the GPA to the minimum standard as listed below.

  • GPA Drop – The failure to raise the GPA to the minimum standard after the probation semester and results in dismissal from the UHP, regardless of how many Honors experiences have been completed.

  • Progress Drop – The failure to meet the minimum experiences and/or other requirements as listed below and results in dismissal from the UHP, regardless of cumulative GPA.




Year

Semester

GPA

Experiences

Other

First

After Fall

> 3.2

Completed Writing & Cultures Core Course

NR

After Spring

> 3.2

NR

NR




Second

After Fall

> 3.2

NR

NR

After Spring

> 3.2

Completed 5 honors experiences, with at least one experience from each of the categories (A & B)

NR




Third

After Fall

> 3.3

NR

NR

After Spring

> 3.3

Completed and/or In Progress with 8 Honors experiences

NR




Fourth

After Fall

> 3.3

Completed and/or In Progress with 10 Honors experiences (minimum of 7 Category A, and minimum of 2 Category B experiences)

3.5 GPA attainable after Spring semester;
Thesis in progress?

After Spring

> 3.5

Completed 10 Honors experiences (minimum of 7 Category A, and minimum of 2 Category B experiences)

Completed Thesis or not?



NR

NR = not reviewed as part of the audit


Students concerned about meeting these requirements need to schedule an appointment with the UHP Assistant Director for Academic & Co-curricular Support to develop a personalized plan for completing the UHP requirements.


Oxford Scholars Program Audit Standards

Each student’s record in the Oxford Scholars Program (OSP) is reviewed at the conclusion of each semester. This audit involves both the cumulative GPA in all courses and the completion of OSP Enrichment Points in both the Scholarship category and the Leadership & Service category. The purpose of the audit is to ensure the student is making satisfactory progress toward the completion of the OSP certificate.


Each student will be placed into one of four categories upon the completion of the audit:


  • In Good Standing – The student meets the GPA and Enrichment Points as listed below.

  • Probation – The student does not meet the GPA requirement and is placed on probation for a semester. This semester of probation is provided so the student can raise the GPA to the minimum standard as listed below.

  • GPA Drop – The failure to raise the GPA to the minimum standard after the probation semester and results in dismissal from the OSP, regardless of how many Enrichment Points have been completed.

  • Progress Drop – The failure to meet the minimum Enrichment Points as listed below and results in dismissal from the OSP, regardless of cumulative GPA.




Year

Semester

GPA

Enrichment Points

First

After Fall

> 3.2

NR

After Spring

> 3.2

Completed at least 2 Enrichment Points




Second

After Fall

> 3.2

NR

After Spring

> 3.2

Completed at least 5 Enrichment Points, with at least 1 point completed in each of the two main areas: Scholarship, and Leadership & Service




Third

After Fall

> 3.3

NR

After Spring

> 3.3

Completed at least 7 Enrichment Points




Fourth

After Fall

> 3.3

Completed and/or In Progress with at least 10 Enrichment Points

After Spring

> 3.3

Completed at least 10 Enrichment Points, with at least 5 points in each of the two main areas: Scholarship, and Leadership & Service

NR = not reviewed as part of the audit


To earn the Oxford Scholars Certificate, students must graduate with at least a 3.3 cumulative GPA and earn at least 10 Oxford Scholars Enrichment Points, with a minimum of 5 points from each of the two main areas: Scholarship, and Leadership & Service. Students may petition the Honors & Scholars Program to have additional experiences reviewed for Enrichment Points toward the Oxford Scholars Certificate. Students concerned about fulfilling these Enrichment Points need to schedule an appointment with the Honors & Scholars Assistant Director for Academic & Co-curricular Support to develop a personalized plan for earning the Oxford Scholars Certificate.
These audit guidelines are effective immediately for the OSP class entering
in the Fall 2006 semester.



Advising University Honors & Oxford Scholars Program Students


Priority Scheduling:

All Honors students (which includes Harrison Scholars but not Oxford Scholars) have priority scheduling. Therefore, please make attempts to advise them early in the advising season before priority registration begins. Honors students receive this privilege because there are a limited number of Honors courses, and they usually must fit their other classes around these Honors courses. Also, please inform students that Honors courses WILL close. Students are not guaranteed of getting in every Honors course that they want. They should have back-up choices for both their Honors courses and non-Honors courses.


Advising Components

Advise Honors & Scholars students as you would any other student. Go through the Miami Plan, CAS requirements if applicable, etc. For the Honors-related or Scholars-related information, we suggest that you open up the Honors BlackBoard site or Scholars Blackboard site (whichever one applies) with the student and guide the student through the following steps. Suggested pages to click on for each step are shown in parentheses. Many students are not aware of the wealth of information each respective site contains.



  1. Count Experiences (Click on “Program Requirements”). Go over the Honors or Oxford Scholars Program Requirements with the students (which can be found in a more complete form on the Audit Sheet). For Harrison Scholars and Honors students, help them count how many “Category A” and “Category B” experiences they have so that they can see their progress. For Oxford Scholars, help them count how many “Scholarship” and “Leadership & Service” enrichment points they have.

  • Honors experiences and Oxford Scholars enrichment points are not tracked completely by DARS. Some “Category A” Honors experiences (e.g., 180 Honors seminars) and some “Scholarship” enrichment points (e.g., HON 280) may show up as electives but still count toward program requirements. Most “Category B” Honors experiences (e.g., HON 110: Faculty Mentor Program, LeaderShape) and “Leadership and Service” enrichment points (e.g., EMPOWER) will show up as electives or not appear on the DARS at all.

  • Students with highly structured majors or “packed programs” (these include programs/plans of study such as double majors, chemistry, biochemistry, anything in the SEAS, Physics, Western College, Architecture, Interior Design, Teacher Education, and Pre-Medicine) should be referred to Kari Taylor so that they can make sure they can fit their Honors experiences or Scholars enrichment points into their four-year schedules. Honors Companion Guides for certain majors can be found under the “Program Requirements” tab on the Honors BlackBoard site.

  • Honors students are entitled to a tuition waiver of up to 8 credits for Miami-sponsored summer study, courses, and research. A student can fill out a form to access these funds after attending Miami for two calendar years, completing at least 8 Honors experiences (at least 7 of which must be “Category A” experiences and at least 1 of which must be a “Category B” experience), and achieving an overall GPA of at least a 3.5. If a student is thinking of completing a study abroad experience, internship, or independent study during a future summer, you should suggest that they hit the
    8-experiences mark prior to the summer they wish to use it (between sophomore and junior year or between junior and senior year).



  1. Select Experiences or Enrichment Opportunities. Show Honors students where they can find the listing of Honors courses on the BlackBoard site (click on “Courses/Registration”). Show Oxford Scholars students where they can find the listing of options that count for enrichment points (click on “Program Requirements” and then on “Requirements for students entering 2006 and After”). Depending on the date of your appointment with a student in the Honors Program, the new course listing may not be posted, but the listing from the current semester will be there to use as a general guide. The new listing is usually posted 1-2 weeks before priority registration begins. Many of the Honors courses will qualify for MPF and CAS.

  • For Honors students, suggest taking 1-2 Honors experiences per semester. For Oxford Scholars students, suggest earning 2 enrichment points per semester.

  • Encourage students to have back-up options because some Honors classes WILL close.

  • In addition to courses, also point out some of the information on the BlackBoard site about internships, research, and scholarships/fellowships. For example, a student majoring in political science might be interested in the MTV Internship, and a student majoring in sociology or looking at going into law might benefit from the Urban Leadership Internship Program. Encourage students to look through the appropriate site (Honors or Oxford Scholars) after their appointment with you.

  1. Register. Share the information about priority scheduling with Honors students. Advise these students that their registration window is open during priority registration and then re-opens for changes to non-Honors courses during their “regular” (credit-based) registration window. If Oxford Scholars students inquire about priority registration, explain that Oxford Scholars students are not granted priority registration because the options for fulfilling Oxford Scholars program requirements are more flexible and numerous (and thus do not pose any extra or special obstacles for registration).


Special Considerations:

  • Grade/Credit-No Credit: All Honors courses must be taken for a grade to count as Honors experiences (with the exception of HON 280, which is only offered as credit/no credit).

  • AP & Post-secondary Credit: Honors and Oxford Scholars students often bring in large numbers of AP credits. Also, be prepared to find entries on a student’s DAR for one-time course offerings not listed in the Bulletin and a varied amount of post-secondary credit including International Baccalaureate and CLEP. You may have to spend extra time checking the DARS to make sure it is correct. In some cases, a student will have the Miami Plan completely finished when he or she meets with you. Still advise these students on the basics of the Miami Plan, DARS, and registration procedures, but then refer them to a departmental adviser. Also suggest that these students meet with Kari Taylor if they are unsure how to fit their Honors or Scholars requirements into their
    four-year plan.



Common courses that may appear on an Honors Student’s schedule:




HON 110

The Faculty Mentor Program.

Approximately 10 students meet informally on a weekly basis with a faculty member and go to campus events, read books together, etc.



0 credits. Credit/No Credit Grading.

Category B Experience.

HON 280

HON 280T (LLC class)

HON 280Z (Honors Ambassadors)

Introduction to Scholarship, Leadership, and Service.

Students attend on-campus events, participate in discussions, and write follow-up papers. Offered as a general course and sections specific to the first-year LLC.



1 credit. Credit/No Credit Grading.

Category B Experience.

ENG H101, ENG H102, AMS H101, PHL H102, etc.

First Year Honors Writing and Cultures Core Courses.

All incoming Honors students will be registered for one of these courses. They take the place of one of the MPF I requirements. If students still need to take a second MPF I course, they should enroll in ENG 112 for the Spring.



3 credits. Counts for ENG 111 OR 112. If both composition requirements are filled by other credits, will count for MPF IIIA (if course ends in H101) OR MPF IIIB (if course ends in H102). Does not qualify for any CAS requirements.

Category A Experience.

*80 Courses

Ex. EDT 180A, ENG 180U, POL 180B, etc.

Other Core Courses. 180 and 380 Honors Seminars.

Specially developed Honors courses. These courses are developed uniquely for Honors students and are not taught anywhere else across the university. They are offered for limited times. Some fulfill MPF or CAS requirements or BOTH MPF/CAS. Credit determined on an individual course basis each semester.



Credits vary. Category A Experience.

MPF Courses ending in “H”.

Ex. ATH 175H, COM 135H, MTH 249H

Honors Versions of MPF Courses.

Regular MPF courses with increased rigor and/or different classroom set-ups. Fulfill same MPF/CAS requirements as non-honors versions of the courses.



Credits vary. Category A Experience.

Other courses ending with a letter modifier.

Ex. MTH 222T, BUS 150C, BUS 170C, etc.

Special Cases.

If a course is not one of the types listed above but has a letter “modifier” after the course number, it MAY be an honors course. Sometimes departmental honors programs or other courses have modifiers. These might count as honors experiences (or they might not). Ask the student or refer him or her to the Honors and Scholars Program for information about these special cases.






Frequently Asked Questions:


Can Non-Honors students take Honors Courses?

Yes, but availability is limited. If students are interested, they should contact the individual instructor and state the reason they wish to be in this particular course. Students who have taken Honors courses and are applying to the Honors Program are given special consideration.


Where do Honors & Scholars students live?

They may choose to live in whichever community they want. In past years, approximately 140 students or 70% of the incoming Honors students chose to live in the Honors and Scholars first year Living Learning Community. Although students living in an H&S LLC have easier access to resources and additional programs, ALL students in the H&S academic programs receive the information and advice they need.


Co-curricular events/activities in the first year and upperclass H&S LLCs are open to everyone. Encourage all students to attend.
When do I refer a student to the Honors and Scholars Program Office?

Anytime you deem necessary, but students do not NEED to come in every semester. If a student has specific questions about how to fit their Honors experiences into their degree programs or about how to pursue research, internship, or thesis projects, please ask them to contact Kari Taylor (taylork8@muohio.edu). If they have specific questions about being admitted to the Honors Program, please ask them to contact Kristy Burton (burtonkd@muohio.edu).


Can students apply to get into the Honors Program after they are already here?

Yes. Go to http://www.honors.muohio.edu/, and click on “Current Miami Students.” Then “Honors Information.” All current Miami students interested in becoming part of the University Honors Program must submit an application. In order to be considered for admission to the Honors Program, current Miami students must have completed at least 15 credit hours at the University. The majority of students accepted into Honors will also have at least a 3.5 cumulative GPA and fewer than 45 credit hours.


Selection Criteria: As a current Miami University student, selection into the Honors Program requires excellent academic credentials as exemplified through GPA, writing, and extracurricular activities. In making admission decisions, the University Honors Program, like Miami University as a whole, also takes into consideration applicants' special abilities, talents, and achievements. The number of current students who can be offered admission to the Honors Program is limited. Applicants will be accepted on a space-available basis. Students who are Oxford Scholars or who have previously taken Honors courses are given special consideration for admission. Attention is also given to whether students can reasonably complete Program requirements by graduation.
Applications for students wanting to enter the Honors Program in the Spring are available in August on the Honors and Scholars website and are due at the beginning of December. Applications for students wanting to enter the Honors Program the following Fall are available in January and are due at the beginning of May. Applications are held until final grades for the semester are available. Students are notified of the admission decision by letter.
What should I do if an Honors course is not showing up correctly on DARS?

Normally, one would contact the Registrar’s Office or send the student there to have it fixed. This is still a correct course of action; however, if the problems arise from H101/H102 Honors First Year Core Courses, please send Kari Taylor (taylork8@muohio.edu) an email with the student’s name, Banner ID, and a description as to how the course is appearing incorrectly. We have had tremendous difficulty with having these courses show up correctly on the DARS, so please advise students to check the DARS at the beginning of the next semester and to contact Kari Taylor directly should it still be a problem.


When and where can I find the Honors Course List for the Spring?

The Honors course list can be found as a link to a MS Word document on the Honors Program BlackBoard site under “Courses/Registration.” This information is posted as soon as it is available, but it may not be up until after your advising appointment with a student. A listing without descriptions can also be found at the beginning of the printed Course Schedule from the Registrar’s Office.


What is the Business Honors Program?

The Business Honors Program is separate from the University Honors Program. Students may be in both or either of the two programs. University Honors students are automatically admitted into the Business Honors Program. Approximately 30 students are admitted to this program each year, and they take a series of special courses, usually one each semester. (First year students will probably be enrolled in BUS 150C, BUS 170C, or other business courses ending in a “C” modifier.) Refer to the School of Business “Honors Companion Guide” for more information.


Departments and Divisions, such as SBA, may offer honors programs for their students that are separate from the University Honors Program (which spans all majors and divisions). For a list of departmental/divisional honors programs, go to http://casnov1.cas.muohio.edu/honors/other/index.html. Please note that this site provides a general list, not a comprehensive one. To find out more about one of these programs or to find out about a program not on the list, you should contact the division or department directly. For University Honors, a student may count up to two departmental/divisional honors courses as University Honors course experiences. Oxford Scholars can earn 4 enrichment points for completing a departmental/divisional honors program.

Honors & Scholars Program Staff, Academic Year 2006-2007




Carolyn Haynes

Director

9-1627

haynesca@muohio.edu

Kristy Burton

Associate Director for Enrollment Management

9-4158

burtonkd@muohio.edu

R. Hays Cummins

Harrison Scholars Professor

9-1338

cumminrh@muohio.edu


Yildrim Dilek

Harrison Scholars Professor

9-2212

9-5500


dileky@muohio.edu

Kathy Durham

Administrative Associate

Harrison Coordinator



9-2021

durhamke@muohio.edu

Katie Egart

Urban Leadership Internship Coordinator

9-3389

egartmk@muohio.edu

John Forren

Associate Director for Curriculum and
Co-curriculum

9-6298

forrenjp@muohio.edu

Tiffany Grubb

Program Assistant

9-3399

burtontr@muohio.edu

Terry Perlin

Harrison Scholars Professor

9-5673

perlintm@muohio.edu

Debra Stanley

Assistant Director for Experiential Education and Community

9-4162

stanleda@muohio.edu

Kari Taylor

Assistant Director for Academic and
Co-curricular Support

9-3398


taylork8@muohio.edu



1 Baxter Magolda, M. B. & King, P. M. (Ed.). (2004). Learning partnerships: Theory and models of practice to educate for self-authorship. Sterling, VA: Stylus.





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