Working group



Yüklə 424.8 Kb.
səhifə1/4
tarix30.10.2017
ölçüsü424.8 Kb.
  1   2   3   4


REPORT

OF

WORKING GROUP

FOR

SHIPBUILDING
AND SHIPREPAIR INDUSTRY


FOR THE

ELEVENTH FIVE YEAR PLAN

(2007-2012)


Government of India

MINISTRY OF SHIPPING, ROAD TRANSPORT & HIGHWAYS
MARCH, 2007

I N D E X

Sl. No.

Particulars

Page Nos.

From

To

1.

Chapter I - Performance of Indian Shipbuilding Yards in 9th and 10th Plan, findings and Targets for 11th Plan

1

8

2.

Chapter 2 – Shipbuilding in India, its competitiveness and need for subsidy

9

15

3.

Chapter 3 – New Shipyards and Funding

16

17

4.

Chapter 4 – Initiatives required and recommendations for growth of Shipbuilding in 11th Plan

18

21

5.

Chapter 5 – Fiscal and Administrative Reforms

22

24

6.

Chapter 6 – R&D in Shipbuilding

25

26

7.

Chapter 7 - Ship Repair Industry

27

48

8.

Chapter 8 – 11th Plan outlay for Shipbuilding and Ship repair

49




9.

Chapter 9 – Summary of Recommendations for Shipbuilding and Ship repair

50

51

9.

Annexure 1 - Details regarding Public and Private Sector Shipyards in India

52

53

10.

Annexure 2 – Fiscal Reforms

54

61



11.

Annexure 3 – 10th Plan Outlay and Expenditure

62




12.

Annexure 4 – Details of outlay for R&D Schemes

63

66

13.

Annexure 5 – Details of outlay for Conducting Studies

67

68

14.

Annexure 6 – 11th Plan outlay for Cochin Shipyard Limited

69




15.

Annexure 7 – 11th Plan outlay of Hindustan Shipyard Limited

70




16.

Annexure 8 - 11th Plan outlay of Hooghly Dock and Port Engineers Limited

71





CHAPTER – 1

PERFORMANCE OF INDIAN SHIPBUILDING YARDS IN IX & X PLAN; FINDINGS AND TARGETS FOR XI PLAN

  1. India requires a vibrant and strong shipbuilding industry for economic as well as strategic reasons. For a country that is predominantly peninsular in nature with a coastline of 7516.5 km and 1197 islands, India’s shipbuilding capabilities which have not kept pace with its economic development, market demand and human resource potential need to be addressed in the 11th Plan.

  2. The Indian shipbuilding is mainly centred around 27 shipyards comprising of 8 Public Sector 6 yards under Central and 2 under State Governments) and 19 Private Sector shipyards as per details placed at Annexure-1. The shipyards between them have 20 dry docks and 40 slipways with an estimated capacity of 281,200 DWT1. A major share of this capacity is held by the 8 public sector yards and only Cochin Shipyard Limited (1,10,00 DWT) and Hindustan Shipyard Limited (80,000 DWT) have the required infrastructure and graving dock to build large vessels. Private shipyards though more in number are severely limited by capacity and size of ship they can build but some expansion plans are now visible in this direction and they are catching up in this respect.

  3. All major financial and economic institutions (IMF, World Bank, OECD) are forecasting relatively strong economic growth for the world economy. As recently as September 2006 the IMF had raised its expectations of economic growth for the 2007 to around 5% pa. Such an outcome would maintain trade at around current levels, and would continue the high demand for both bulk and container shipping. Energy demand is expected to remain high. In turn, this development would encourage a continuation of the strong demand for new vessels.

Performance of Indian Shipbuilding Industry

  1. The Indian shipbuilding industry has since long being dogged by low capacity, poor productivity and lack of modernisation. Due to high labour cost and lack of competitive edge there has been a gradual shift of shipbuilding from Europe to Asia. South Korea entered shipbuilding market in the late 1970’s to create the biggest shipbuilding industry in the world in just 20 years. China has followed suite in the late 1980’s and created the third largest shipbuilding industry in a shorter time frame. Korea (36%), Japan (24%) and China (17%) command almost 77% of world shipbuilding market totalling around Rs 200 billion $.

  2. Today, the global shipping industry is experiencing an unprecedented demand for new building ever witnessed in its history. This has created a window of opportunity for the Indian shipbuilding industry that was not available earlier.

  3. The targets set in the IX plan by Indian Shipbuilding yards was 0.3 million tons which was achieved but a modest projections of only 0.4 million DWT was made for the X plan. Contrary to expectations the order book today stands at 1.3 million DWT. This has been possible on account of the shipbuilding boom and both foreign/Indian Shipping Companies are coming forward to place new building orders on Indian Yards. This has enabled the industry’s order books to grow from Rs 1500 crs in 2002 to Rs 14,000 crs (roughly 3060 m $) in 2006 and by the end of this Fiscal Year this might be touching Rs 15,000 crs as is evident from the segment wise order book shown below.

Ships

No

Rs Crs

Cargo Ships Small and Medium

62

3570

Containers

18

3330

Offshore Logistics

57

3333

Offshore Service Vessels

8

554

CG Ships (Non-Combatants)

22

1225

Heavy Lift

4

440

Passenger Ships

5

244




Port Service Crafts

19

237

Barges

12

120

Others

3

734

Total

210

13787

Total Value of Order Rs 13787 crs (3063 M$)

  1. The growth over a five year period of the 9th Plan was hardly 23 percent, averaging 4.5 percent per year. In the 10th Plan period the growth has been of 72% with an average rate of 15% per year. Hence growth of shipbuilding in India has gone up from 4.5% to 15% per year in X Plan period. Due to this India’s share in the world market has gone from an insignificant low of 0.1% in the beginning of 10th Plan to 1.3% in 2006

  2. On the export front, one Public Sector Shipyard i.e. CSL and 3 private sector shipyards viz ABG, Bharati & Chowgule performed remarkably well during the X plan period and were able to get export orders. A meager six ships were exported in the IX plan but orders for export of more than 50 ships have been taken by Indian yards in the the X plan. It will be observed that against 0.3 million DWT exported during IX Plan, the order book for export is more than 1.00 million DWT and the projections for the XI plan are about 4.00 million DWT as shown below indicating a growth of about 80% per year during the XI plan.



  1. It is also evident that out of 1.28 million DWT on order during the X Plan period, more than 1.00 million DWT is for export, clearly indicating the highly favourable climate for export and the relatively negative climate for domestic construction of ships for Indian owners.



  1. Analysis of the export orders show that that barring exception of CSL, which has exported some large and medium size ships, the bulk of the export is in small ship segment where India has emerged as a major place the construction of offshore and oil industry ships like Offshore Supply Vessels (OSVs) and Anchor Handling tugs. Thus, from an inward looking industry dependent on government orders, the Indian shipbuilding industry is emerging as internationally competitive export led industry. Nevertheless, the industry is still in its nascent stage and dependent on government support for subsidy. The industry is expected to become self sufficient in 10 years time and will no longer require subsidy thereafter.

  2. The main reason for this dependence is infrastructure constraints of Indian Yards. Hence while foreign shipping companies are building their medium and small merchant ships in India, Indian shipping companies are purchasing their ships from abroad both big and small but more big than small. The present fiscal and statutary rules on shipbuilding in the country are heavily loaded in favour of export and discourages construction of ships by Indian yards for Indian flag.

  3. Another significant aspect is in the IX Plan period an investment of Rs 10 crs took place against a target of 280 crores in the shipbuilding sector, due to recession and poor order book position. However there was a jump in the investments which increased to Rs.322 Crores in the X Plan due to the export market. But this has been mainly in infrastructure and not in technology, R&D, design or upgradation to high value products.

  4. It is clear from the above that India can grow in the shipbuilding sector in a healthy manner if shipbuilding is recognized as a strategic industry and if it can enjoy simple taxation policies with a fully empowered regulating body for quick decision-making .

Market Potential

  1. The Indian merchant fleet on 01.03.2007 comprised 780 vessels of 8.45 million gross tonnage. As per INSA’s (Indian National Shipowners Association) assessment about 374 vessels of 3.79 million GT would be scrapped over the next 5 years and equivalent tonnage would need to be inducted to maintain the same level. Keeping in view of the XI Plan target of 10 million GT, the number of additional vessels which will roughly translate to 830 vessels based on average existing tonnage per ship. Taking into account the 374 vessels of 3.79 m GT to be replaced, the total tonnage required to be added in the 11th plan will be around 5.33 million GT and 455 vessels. As per INSA’s assessment the investment required for building this number of new ships will be Rs 55,000 crs.

  2. The annual average global order book grew by 78.86 million DWT in the period 2001-05 and in excess of 100 million DWT in the last 2 years. Of the 14,000 crs worth vessels on order in Indian yards nearly 68% are for foreign buyers. With such a trend, it will be reasonable to assume that a huge market is available for the taking by the Indian shipbuilding industry provided they have the capacity. Under these conditions, a faster growth of shipbuilding capacity would be in our national interest.

  3. If the above factors are taken into account then it is seen that the market potential for new building in the 11th plan is much more than the capacity of Indian yards which if not utilised will be gain to other countries such as Korea, Japan or China. This calls for a reassessment of our policy towards shipbuilding in the 11th plan and a pro-active approach by the government and the industry.

Future Prospects - Indian Shipbuilding

  1. The Indian Shipbuilders Association (ISBA) has carried out an assessment of the present and future growth trend of the industry and are of the view that this industry can grow at a rate of more than 30% and this momentum can be maintained for the next 10 years to reach a level of XI Plan of 5 million DWT order book as against 1.3 million the X Plan. With this shipbuilding industry would also be able to achieve a world share of 2.2% and an annual turnover of Rs. 18,000 crores (2.5 Billion $) in the last year of 11th Plan. It is expected that by the time the shipbuilding industry matures by 2017 it would have attained more than 7.5% of global order book and will have a turnover of Rs 40,500 crs (9 billion $).

Projected order book turnover




2006-07

2007-12

2012-17

Order Book (Mn DWT)

1.3

5.00

18.00

Global Order Book (Mn DWT)

231.2

231.2*

231.2*

India’s Share of Global Order book

0.4%

2.2%

7.8%

Delivery (Mn DWT)

0.65

2.50

9.00

Turnover (US$ Billion)

0.65

2.50

9.00

Shipbuilding Industry % of GDP

0.04%

0.16%

0.27%

Total Employment

12,000

78,000

2,52,000

* The global order book is likely to decline after about 2010 onwards and in that event the global share will increase.

  1. In addition to this, the ship repair industry is likely to make a contribution of around 440 million $ to the annual turnover thus bringing the total industry’s turnover to around 3 billion $ by 2012.

  2. There are good chances that the industry can achieve the targets of the 11th plan earlier if new shipyards on the anvil are set up on time. For this suitable investment climate needs to be created. With this, the optimistic figure for the 11th Plan could be close to 10 million DWT with a value of 8-10 billion $.

  3. If self-reliance in shipbuilding is the key, the present subsidy scheme must be extended through the XI Plan period. Once the skills and growth are well-established, this can be reviewed in the XII Plan period. However subsidy alone is not the cure for all the ills of the industry. There is a need for rationalization of certain taxes and customs procedures to give this industry the competitive edge. There is also a need to streamline certain statutary rules on approvals of designs and certification of equipment manufactured indigenously. Only then we can ensure at least Rs.10,000 crores investment planned by the private agencies during this period actually materializes.

  4. While the future growth figures mentioned above might look impressive when compared to its past performance these pale in comparison with China as shown below where the Indian targets set for 2017 of 18 million DWT order book is already exceeded by China. Hence there is a need to have a much more progressive shipbuilding programme in place for setting up of new yards.



  1. The growth of Chinese shipbuilding industry is now becoming a threat to almost all major shipbuilding nations as China is planning to become the leading shipbuilding nation with an aim to corner more than 30% global share by 2015. India is probably the only country that will be able to match the Chinese prices with its relatively low labour costs and industrial base for manufacture of equipment.

11th Plan Targets in Shipbuilding

  1. Physical performance targets of Rs 2.5 Billion $ (Rs 18000 crs) annual turnover of 5 million DWT and a global share of 2.2% should be set up by the last year of the Plan period. This should convert into nearly 400-500 small and medium size ships in the entire plan period.

CHAPTER – 2


SHIPBUILDING IN INDIA, ITS COMPETITIVENESS & NEED FOR SUBSIDY

The Future & Present

  1. During the X Plan period, Indian Shipbuilding has received significant global attention for the very first time in its post independence history. Order book position increased substantially from 0.25 Million DWT in 2004 to over 1.3 Million DWT in 2006. Though this growth has been very small, as compared to global growth in the sector, the fact remains that it is significant and we need to get our act together to use this very promising window of opportunity.

  2. Having taken roots during the X Plan period, there is a need to propel India’s Shipbuilding industry in the future to be among top five shipbuilding countries. Growth of the Industry should include R&D, infusion of technology, our own designs, development of skill, increase in Indian tonnage built by Indian shipyards, etc. A market share which increased from 0.1% in the 9th Plan to 1.0% in the 10th Plan is likely to increase to 2.2% and can be increased to 3.00% of the global order book in the XI plan period if industry is given due attention and issues blocking its growth are addressed immediately and holistically.

  3. The shipbuilding industry has its own distinctive feature as compared to other industries in the country. It is unique in a way that it has to sell first and construct later, unlike the auto industry or others, where one manufactures first and sells later. Further shipyards get orders only if they are credible (deliver quality ships on time) and it can be credible only after successfully executing consistently under international competition. Further, it has to be globally competitive against the best yards in the world. Unfortunately, the shipyards are faced with very stiff taxes, tariff, duties, and financing charges as compared to foreign yards. Unlike other manufacturing industries the product takes two years to deliver and requires high cost finances over a long period. This weakens the competitiveness of the industry.

Capacity of Indian Shipbuilding

  1. Nothing was more GLARING in the X Plan than the establishment of the fact that the future of Indian Shipbuilding is in the GLOBAL market and also our ability to attain a foothold. We need to build on this and provide the engine for growth. It is clear that if the policies are favourable, we are as good as foreign shipyards and deliver high quality ships on time. Accordingly, while foreigners commend our skills, Indian ship owners deride and accuse our shipyards of poor performance and productivity. The reasons are mainly fiscal in nature. Annexure-2 clearly brings out this. The cost of administration of taxes and cost of a design to suit Indian flag requirements is not included in the annexure.

Productivity

2.8 A comparison of productivity shows that while China may be well ahead of India in total ship building, it’s productivity is almost the same as India and this is one area that India can take a lead on the strength of its IT industry and setting up new modern shipyards.



COUNTRY

COMPLETIONS M DWT

EMPLOYEES

PRODUCTIVITY DWT PERSON

JAPAN (2004)

23.2

80,000

290

KOREA (2004)

23.0

71,800

320

CHINA (2004)

8.8

158,000

56

INDIA (2006)

0.6

12,000

50

Need For Subsidy

2.9 The government has tried various promotional and subsidy measures since the 70’s which managed to keep the industry alive at a time when the global industry was passing through a deep recession after the boom of the 70’s which, the country missed due to lack of industrial growth. The shipbuilding industry is now witnessing a growth phase after a gap of almost 25 years. This is an opportunity for India to revive its shipping industry and bring it at par with the rest of the world.

2.10 The current scheme of 30% shipbuilding subsidy was introduced in 2002 but its real effect in promoting shipbuilding was felt as soon as the industry moved into the growth path globally in 2003-04. Although the Indian shipbuilding industry was slow off the start block it has picked up surprisingly well within a short time despite severe restrictions in its infrastructure and capacity.

Why Subsidy

2.11 Subsidy is required to provide an even playing field. Unlike other industries that is protected by custom and duty barriers the shipbuilding industry has to compete on a global pricing levels as there is no duty imposed by the government in import of ships and dredgers. In addition, the Indian yards have to pay excise and VAT on all indigenous items as well as on complete ships which is not the case with ships imported.



2.13 The shipbuilding industry is required to pay 19 different types of duties/taxes and levies, a summary of which is placed below along with the comparison with foreign yards

Details

Total Additional Per ship (%)

Cost disadvantage v/s Foreign yards (%)

Taxes/Duties paid back to govt. (%)

Domestic Order

Export Order

VAT and CST

4.00

4.00

4.00

0.00

Working Capital

4.00

2.00

-

-

Bank/Refund Guarantee

3.60

2.40

-

-

LC Cost

0.30

0.20

-

-

Insurance

1.60

0.60

-

-

CAPEX Finance

0.90

0.40

-

-

CAPEX Custom Duty

1.70

1.70

1.70

1.70

Custom Bond Cost

0.25

0.25

0.25

0.25

Clearing and Forwarding

0.60

0.30

-

-

Excise and VAT

4.18

4.18

4.18

4.18

Service Tax

1.40

1.40

1.40

1.40

Freight Differential

2.50

2.50

-

-

Price of Equip Differential

5.00

5.00

-

-

Octroi

2.50

2.50

2.50

2.50

Power

0.50

0.50

-

-

Corporate Tax

3.50

1.20

3.50

3.50

Tax on Foreign Income

0.27

0.27

0.27

0.27

Income Tax

0.00

0.00

2.05

2.05

Taxes by Ancillary Units and sub-contractors

0.00

0.00

1.00

1.00

Total

37.6

30.2

20.85

16.85

2.14 Subsidy is required for the future growth and consolidation of the shipbuilding industry. Without this the industry is likely to collapse and there will be no shipbuilding industry left in the country.

2.15 Subsidy should be used to get a foothold in the market to become competitive internationally. If this is not done, then we may never have the volumes, the technology, scale and skill set.

2.16 Continuation of subsidy will attract massive investment required for setting up new shipyards which India needs.

2.17 A study carried out by ISBA shows that the following targets are attainable by the industry in a subsidy scenario.







Financial Implications

2.18 The financial implications of the subsidy are shown in tabulated form below. This table has been prepared on the basis of the projections shown above. In order to estimate the total benefit a computation of the total Net Present Value of the net Government benefits {Taxes (Shipbuilding + Ancillary) – Subsidy} has been computed from 2006 onwards. The tax rates taken are 18% in the 11th Plan; 15% in the 12th Plan, 12% in the 13th Plan and 9% in the 14th Plan. The discount rate is taken as 11% for NPV. The subsidy has been taken as 30% in the 11th Plan, 20% in the 12th Plan and 10% in the 13th Plan.



Year

Shipbuilding Revenue

Subsidy

Total Government Income

Net Govt Benefit (Tax – NPV of Net Govt Benefit

2007

2925

878

684




2008

3803

1141

890

-251

2009

4943

1483

1157

-326

2010

6426

1928

1504

-424

2011

8354

2506

1955

-552

2012

10860

3258

2541

-717

2013

14118

2824

2753

-71

2014

18354

3671

3579

-92

2015

23860

4772

4653

-119

2016

31018

6204

6049

-155

2017

40324

8065

7863

-202

2018

34947

3495

5452

1957

2019

454311

4543

7087

2544

2020

59061

5906

9213

3307

2021

76779

7678

11977

9213

2022

99812

9981

15571

11977

2023

129756

0.00

15181

11678

2024

129750

0.00

15181

11678

2025

129750

0.00

15181

11678

2.19 The NPV of Net Government benefit is Rs 21,671 crs if subsidy is given to the shipbuilding industry. Apart from this there will be a tremendous value addition in terms of jobs, expansion of manufacturing and ancillary industry as well as other down stream effects. A similar expansion will also take place in the Ship Repairs industry and therefore the total benefit will be much more.

2.20 In the event subsidy is not given there is unlikely to be any new investment in setting up of new shipyards or expansion of existing facilities. The existing industry, being old and obsolete will not be able to compete globally and may have to close down.



CHAPTER –3

NEW SHIPYARDS AND FUNDING

New Shipyards in XI Plan

3.1 The new Shipyards likely to be set up in the XI Plan in the private sector are as under:



Pipavav Shipyard

3.2 Sea King International Ltd (SKIL) announced Plans to establish a large shipbuilding yard. SKIL is considering development of its 200 Acre land at Pipavav at Gujarat to build docks of 350/65 meter size. The docks will be in a position to build, repair and dry-dock VLCCs/LNG carriers, Offshore Platforms, Rigs and Large container ships.



Adani Shipyard

3.3 The Adani Group plans to build a shipyard at Mundra, Gujarat. The facility will build ships of various ranges upto VLCC size.



L&T Shipyard

3.4 L&T plans an international size shipyard capable of building conventional merchant vessels, naval ship construction and design services. It is learnt that they have selected a site at Kakinada in the east-coast.



ABG & Bharati Shipyards

3.5 Both these private sector shipyards have done very well in X plan and have gone in for Initial Public Offer. Both of them have committed approximately Rs.400 Crores each for expansion of their facilities and set up new shipyards on the west coast to build larger ships.



Funding

3.6 The total investment during the XI plan from all the above can be expected to be in the region of Rs.4000 Crores. All these investments are with the help of continuance of the subsidy scheme by the government and setting up of SEZs for new shipyards in consonance with other fiscal incentives.

3.7 In case all these things do happen, the existing public sector shipyards, viz. CSL, HSL and HDPE will be seriously affected unless -


    1. Existing shipyards/industry is given SEZ status.

    2. Price disadvantage in pricing between existing and new shipyards due to taxes is removed.

    3. Shift of trained manpower from existing shipyards is arrested.

3.8 Hence, it stands to reason that existing PSU shipyards must also be given SEZ status along with new shipyards in order to remain competitive and avoid different interpretation of the same fiscal rule for the same business.

CHAPTER – 4


INITIATIVES REQUIRED & RECOMMENDATIONS FOR GROWTH OF SHIPBUILDING IN XI PLAN

The following course of action, which is an integrated approach, is suggested for ensuring development of shipbuilding sector in India. It is believed that this will remove the structural weakness of the industry as well as address other concerns.



Dedicated SEZ

  1. All ships including dredgers imported by Indian owners from abroad are fully exempted from customs duty. Hence the existing shipbuilding industry is totally unprotected. In fact customs duty of the order of about 35% is imposed on all capital equipment required for shipbuilding even though this measure does not protect any industry in India. There is therefore a need to accord export status for building ships which are built in India for Indian owners. Both existing and future shipyards should be considered as SEZ. Such a status should be accorded to any other ancillary industry that may come up to enable the industry to grow in clusters. Investment will then be structured and will flow in the right direction without affecting the existing units.

Single Window Clearance

  1. The industry is presently subjected to multiple checks and clearance from both Central and State Governments. From being an extremely dynamic as well as cyclical industry, return on investment/capital needs to be ensured by avoiding procedural delays and allowing smooth expansion of capacity. The main deterrent of multiple clearance which delay a project must be removed. Hence environmental clearance, clearance for allocation of land and its development, clearance for power and water requirements and security clearance of the location apart from the long term fiscal climate must be established through a single window.

Professional Monitoring Authority

  1. To ensure targeted development of this sector, there is need for good professional advice at the higher level. If you have to achieve reasonable slice of the world market share in the next 10 years and ensure that investments take place, professional monitoring authority fully empowered must be appointed. This authority will facilitate clearance through a single window and ensure that bottlenecks for investment in the sector are removed.

Design & Investment In R&D

  1. India lags behind in ship design capability, whereby it can develop new designs for the market. Presently most of the designs or part thereof are imported from abroad and virtually there is no innovation indigenously. Availability of design and a strong capability in the Shipyard will enable keeping delivery schedules and cut cost dramatically. The credibility of the shipyard also goes up. There is a need to encourage design and provide fiscal benefits as given to R&D investments in the pharma sector.

Ancillary Industry Development

  1. Almost all the machinery and equipment required inside a ship are presently imported, because it is cheaper as well as of good quality. The same is not produced in India because of low volumes eg. Main engine, gear boxes, shafting, propellers, generators, switchboards, valves, pumps etc. Therefore even though India has the industrial capability, there is no incentive to produce in the country due to low volumes. Hence dedicated areas in the SEZ must be earmarked for ancillary industry also to come up.

Subsidy

  1. Shipbuilding skills take a long time to nurture and build up and industries take time to be set up. Hence the present subsidy scheme needs to be extended for at least the next 10 years so that Indian shipbuilding fully establishes itself in the global arena.

Taxes & Duties

  1. There is a need to bring the taxes and duty structure on par with the competitors in Dubai, Singapore and Colombo. Service Tax on shipbuilding and shiprepair is totally unwarranted and promotes only foreign shipyard to be more competitive. Indian Shipyards are therefore to be exempted from service tax as shipbuilding and shiprepair are both manufacturing activities.

Custom and Excise Duty on Capital Investment on Shipbuilding

  1. Presently about 35% duty is to be paid on all capital equipment such as cranes, plasma cutting machines and other material handling equipment purchased for running a Shipyard. This is totally unwarranted as it does not protect any indigenous industry. This inflates the cost of establishment/expansion of shipyard as compared to International Yards and permanently disables the shipyards in terms of higher capital cost, interest cost and depreciation charges. This also results in reduced return on capital employed and inherently increases the risk profile of investment. Therefore, it is recommended that these investments be exempt from customs/excise duty till such time as the SEZ status is not accorded to the shipyards.

  2. Custom bonded warehouse Rules should be amended to suit Shipbuilding industry including the period for which materials can be stored. Presently, Sec 65 of the Customs Act and its varied interpretations results in a huge increase in cost of production. The whole issue of storage and issue of material for shipbuilding is totally oriented to meet customs procedures and NOT commensurate with industry practice abroad.

  3. There is a need to promote single point taxation or rationalize tax structure (State and Central)in line with competitive yards in South East Asia, viz. Colombo, Dubai, etc. since it is a global market we are targeting.

  4. Simplification of customs procedures, including:

    1. Priority clearance for import

    2. Duty exemption for scrap generated in shipbuilding and ship repair.

  1. The tedious and laborious procedure involved for customs clearance and issue of materials to demoralizes motivated personnel. Eventually there is a lot of wastage of time and manpower mainly to reconcile materials which goes on for years after a project is over.

CHAPTER - 5

FISCAL & ADMINISTRATIVE REFORMS

  1. The reforms required can be broadly grouped into Fiscal and Administrative. Shipbuilding and Ship repair cannot be seen in isolation as far as taxes and levied are concerned. For example, service tax of 12.24% in particular, is affecting the ship repair business of Cochin Shipyard, which constitutes about 60% of the ship repair income generated in India.

  2. Though issues relating to shipbuilding only are addressed in this chapter, the taxes and levies, both central and state affecting ship building and ship repair is enclosed at Annexure-III, showing the present position, modification required, detailed justification for amendment and revenue implication of proposed change.

FISCAL REFORMS-CUSTOMS

Duty on sale of ship

  1. Though items imported for building Ships indigenously are exempted from payment of Customs duty, the ships built and delivered to Indian owners are treated as ships imported and Customs duty @ 5% is levied by treatment of indigenously built ships under the above category will defeat the very purpose of granting the facility of duty free imports of raw materials and parts for shipbuilding extended for indigenous shipbuilding industry. This discourages building of ships for Indian owners and encourages building for overseas owners. This will seriously affect growth of Inland Water Transport and Coastal transport in India.

Duty on capital goods imported for shipbuilding

  1. Capital goods imported for shipbuilding including renewals and replacements of yard facilities are presently dutiable under Customs Act. This must be reversed if climate for Shipbuilding in India is to be encouraged.

  2. Ships are constructed under bond and remain to be bonded till they are broken up even in the case of ships delivered to indigenous owners. Hence it is not construed as a sale for home consumption. However Customs Deptt interpret and assess the above sale of ship to Indian owners as home consumption Sale and value the scrap on the basis of value of the mother material. This leads to continuous litigation and wastage of time and money. This amounts discrimination and is detrimentally affecting the industry. To avoid the same amendment is required.

  3. The imported items kept under customs Bond, if not utilized, within 1 year in the case of shipbuilding and 90 days in the case of ship repair, for the purpose for which imported, are required to be de-bonded paying customs duty and interest which ends up in huge loss to the yards. When such stock of imported materials have become obsolete and unusable, it has to be disposed off. The actual realizable value will be much less than the Customs Duty and interest payable for de-bonding the items. Hence this has to be exempted from levy of interest and customs duty may be charged on realizable value only.

  4. Presently goods imported for ship building and ship repair are kept under bond and drawn for shipbuilding/ship repair operations by taking permission from the Customs Authorities and fitment certificates are furnished. The yards are maintaining all records of import/storage/ consumption of goods. Hence the Customs Authorities can inspect and verify the records at any point of time.

  5. It is suggested to consider “Self Removal System” whereby the yards will maintain Customs Bond and the designated Officers of the yard will control and supervise the bond operations instead of the present customs Establishment in the yards as yard is submitting all required documents including fitment certificates.

  6. This will help the yard to release the warehoused items required for shipbuilding/ship repair activities in time thereby achieve delivery targets/ schedule and reduce huge establishment expenses incurred for maintaining the Customs Establishment in the yards.


Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©muhaz.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə