Environmental checklist form


Particulate Matter Fugitive Dust Emissions



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.
səhifə2/14
tarix31.10.2017
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   14
Particulate Matter Fugitive Dust Emissions

  • Ground-disturbing activities will be suspended when sustained winds exceed 25 mph, instantaneous gusts exceed 35 mph, or dust from construction might obscure driver visibility on public roads.




  • Disturbed areas of the site will be watered as necessary depending on the conditions, using water trucks and/or sprinkler systems, to prevent airborne dust from leaving the site.

  • If available, reclaimed (non-potable) water will be used.




  • All dirt stockpiles would be covered (tarped) or watered daily, as necessary to prevent dispersion of windblown dust




  • All trucks hauling dirt, sand, soil, or other loose materials would be covered or would maintain at least two feet of freeboard (minimum vertical distance between top of load and top of trailer), in accordance with California Vehicle Code Section 23114.




  • All disturbed areas in inactive portions of the site would be covered, seeded, and/or watered until a suitable cover is established or construction activities are resumed. Nontoxic soil stabilizers could be used in accordance with county, Regional Water Quality Project Requirements Project Requirement Description Control Board (RWQCB), (CRWQCB) and California Air Resources Board (CARB) standards.




  • Permanent dust control measures would be implemented as soon as possible following completion of any soil disturbing activities.




  • Project requirements would also be implemented during holidays, weekend periods, or times when work is temporarily suspended, as necessary to control site conditions generating fugitive dust. Contact information for the project manager as well as the Mendocino County Air Quality District would be made available to the public to ensure compliance with applicable regulations.


IV. BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES.
Environmental Setting

Note:This section needs additional review and editing

The Inglenook Fen-Ten Mile Dunes Natural Preserve was designated in 1995 in recognition of its regional and statewide significance and the need to protect its important natural resources.


This unique area contains wetlands and riparian areas, a rare coastal dune ecosystem, the only remaining coastal fen in California, eight rare natural communities, and eight special status plant species. Home to many species of wildlife and an important stop-over for migratory birds, the Preserve also provides USFWS-designated critical wintering and nesting habitat for the Western Snowy Plover, a federally listed threatened shorebird. The Preserve also hosts two populations of federally endangered plant species.
The Inglenook Fen is an area of great biological significance. It is the southernmost in a series of fens extending from Alaska south to this area. It is the only known remaining coastal fen in California, containing a unique assemblage of plants and insects representing a relict biotic community from the Pleistocene. Many species that occur here are rare or endemic.
LESS THAN

POTENTIALLY SIGNIFICANT LESS THAN

SIGNIFICANT WITH SIGNIFICANT

IMPACT MITIGATION IMPACT NO IMPACT

Would the project:

a) Have a substantial adverse effect, either directly or    

through habitat modification, on any species

identified as a sensitive, candidate, or special status

species in local or regional plans, policies, or

regulations, or by the California Department of

Fish and Game or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service?

b) Have a substantial adverse effect on any riparian    

habitat or other sensitive natural community identified

in local or regional plans, policies, or regulations, or

by the California Department of Fish and Game or

the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service?

c) Have a substantial adverse effect on federally    

protected wetlands, as defined by §404 of the Clean

Water Act (including, but not limited to, marsh,

vernal pool, coastal, etc.) through direct removal,

filling, hydrological interruption, or other means?

d) Interfere substantially with the movement of any    

native resident or migratory fish or wildlife species

or with established native resident or migratory

wildlife corridors, or impede the use of native

wildlife nursery sites?

e) Conflict with any local policies or ordinances    

protecting biological resources, such as a tree

preservation policy or ordinance?

f) Conflict with the provisions of an adopted Habitat    

Conservation Plan, Natural Community Conservation

Plan, or other approved local, regional, or state

habitat conservation plan?
Discussion

A primary goal of the road removal is the improvement of stream and dune habitat for, and protection of, rare, threatened, and endangered species and special-status vegetation communities. The plan will be conducted in compliance with all applicable state and federal threatened and endangered species protection laws and regulations. Work under this plan incorporates all relevant recommendations DFG and USFWS have made to avoid and/or minimize impacts to rare, threatened or endangered species in consultations on this and past projects. DPR will obtain a Streambed Alteration Agreement (SAA) from DFG for each watercourse crossing, a process that includes consultation between DFG and several federal regulatory agencies.


Plants, Vegetation Communities and Wetlands

SENSITIVE PLANTS

For the purposes of this document, the definition of “special status plants” used by the California Department of Fish and Game (2009) is used here. They include all plant species that meet one or more of the following criteria:



  • Listed or proposed for listing as threatened or endangered under ESA or candidates for possible future listing as threatened or endangered under the ESA (50 CFR §17.12).

  • Listed or candidates for listing by the State of California as threatened or endangered under CESA (Fish and Game Code §2050 et seq.). A species, subspecies, or variety of plant is endangered when the prospects of its survival and reproduction in the wild are in immediate jeopardy from one or more causes, including loss of habitat, change in habitat, over-exploitation, predation, competition, disease, or other factors (Fish and Game Code §2062). A plant is threatened when it is likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future in the absence of special protection and management measures (Fish and Game Code §2067).

  • Listed as rare under the California Native Plant Protection Act (Fish and Game Code §1900 et seq.). A plant is rare when, although not presently threatened with extinction, the species, subspecies, or variety is found in such small numbers throughout its range that it may be endangered if its environment worsens (Fish and Game Code §1901).

  • Meet the definition of rare or endangered under CEQA §15380(b) and (d). Species that may meet the definition of rare or endangered include the following:

  • Species considered by the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) to be “rare, threatened or endangered in California” (Lists 1A, 1B and 2);

  • Species that may warrant consideration on the basis of local significance or recent biological information5;

  • Some species included on the California Natural Diversity Database’s (CNDDB) Special Plants, Bryophytes, and Lichens List (California Department of Fish and Game 2008).

  • Considered a locally significant species, that is, a species that is not rare from a statewide perspective but is rare or uncommon in a local context such as within a county or region (CEQA §15125 (c)) or is so designated in local or regional plans, policies, or ordinances (CEQA Guidelines, Appendix G). Examples include a species at the outer limits of its known range or a species occurring on an uncommon soil type.

A scoping list of plant species, subspecies, or varieties considered to be special status plants and that have the potential for occurrence in the project area was derived from the most recent “Special Vascular Plants, Bryophytes, and Lichens List” (CDFG 2011a), RareFind (CDFG 2011b), BIOS (CDFG 2011c), and the California Native Plant Society’s Online Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants (CNPS 2011), and plants of local or regional significance not on any list (Table XX).


Surveys in areas potentially affected by proposed project activities for rare plants were conducted by State Parks Natural Resources staff (Bill Maslach, Adam Hutchins, and Alison Cebula on different dates) on April 1, 5-7, May 5, June 10, 15, July 6, 8, 12, 13, 15, 21, 22, 25, and August 10, 2011. Surveys were conducted within a minimum of 100’ from the project area, but typically extended to approximately 200-400, with 100’ being the minimum distance, which typically corresponded to the first or second change in vegetation community away from the project area. Survey methodology followed California Department of Fish and Game’s “Protocols for Surveying and Evaluating Impacts to Special Status Native Plant Populations and Natural Communities” (2009).
Surveys for federally- or state-listed species (Chorizanthe howellii and Erysimum menziesii ssp. menziesii.) that are potentially affected by the project activities were modified to include all occurrences throughout the Preserve. This extensive survey and mapping was conducted by USFWS and CDPR to address impacts of the project on the sensitive plants occurring along the road relative to the extent of occurrences in the Preserve.
To aid in the identification of plants, several lists that have documented plant species occurring in the project area were used as reference (CDPR 2007, Barry & Schlinger 1977). Additionally, DPR has documented many occurrences of rare plants occurring in and near the project area. All relevant mapping was used to aid in the relocation of plant occurrences.
The extent of the survey was throughout the entire project area (Figure XX). A total of approximately 100 hours over 485 acres comprised the field investigations. During the field surveys all plants encountered were documented to produce a floristic inventory of the project site (Appendix XX). All special status plants were mapped.
The project area supports several rare plants and a diversity of natural plant communities that are described below. A list of these species potentially occurring within the project area and an assessment of their habitat is included in Appendix XX.

Rare Plants
Abronia umbellata ssp. breviflora – Pink Sand-Verbena

CRPR List 1B.1 This species is endemic to the coastal strand and foredunes. Plants established behind the foredunes may perennate, where they can persist for several years. Several occurrences are found within and near the coastal strand. Pink sand verbena has occurred in small numbers in the Ten Mile foredunes, but the occurrence was primarily restricted to the south bank of the Ten Mile River near the river mouth. During the past several years since the initial removal efforts of EBG, pink sand verbena now occurs in areas of the foredunes where it did not occur before (Maslach, personal observation).


Pink sand verbena occurs in two areas along the haul road where road removal will directly impact approximately 20 plants. Two plants, each in a different area, occur approximately 60’ from the road and may potentially be impacted by the road removal. Seed collection, direct seeding, and monitoring are proposed for mitigation.
Road removal and the removal of EBG will eventually create habitat for the species.
Agrostis blasdalei – Blasdale's Bent Grass

CRPR List 1B.2 - This species of grass is associated with coastal bluffs, scrub, and coastal prairies, often in open, compacted areas. No occurrences were documented in the project area. No impact.


Angelica lucida – Sea-Watch

CRPR List 4.2 - This perennial herb is found in coastal scrub, often on rocky bluffs. No occurrences were documented. No impact.


Arctostaphylos nummularia ssp. mendocinoensis – Pygmy Manzanita

CRPR 1B.2 - This species is associated with the pygmy forest habitat community. No habitat occurs within the project site. No impact.


Astragalus agnicidus – Humboldt Milk-Vetch

CRPR 1B.1, California Endangered. This species is found in broadleaved upland forest and north coast conifers forests usually inland from the coast. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.



Astragalus pycnostachyus var. pycnostachyusCoastal Marsh Milk-Vetch

CRPR 1B.2 - This perennial herb is found in coastal marshes, usually brackish. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Blennosperma nanum var. robustum – Point Reyes Blennosperma

CRPR 1B.2, California Rare. This species is found in coastal scrub and prairies on the Glass Beach headlands. Microsites are usually open coastal bluffs in sandy soil. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Boschniakia hookeri – Small Groundcone

CRPR 2.3 - This parasitic perennial herb is limited to North America and more specifically a redwood forest type. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Calamagrostis bolanderi – Bolander's Reed Grass

CRPR 4. This species is found in many habitats including coastal scrub, wet meadows, and North Coast coniferous forest. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Calamagrostis crassiglumis – Thurber's Reed Grass

CRPR 2.1 - This species is generally found in wet coastal scrub and freshwater marshes. Microsites may include marshy swales within grassland or coastal scrub. No plants were detected during the botanical survey; however there is a known occurrence from the Inglenook Fen, which will not be impacted by the proposed project.


Calamagrostis foliosa – Leafy Reed Grass

CRPR 4.2 - This species is generally found on rocky bluffs near the ocean. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Calystegia purpurata ssp. saxicola – Coastal Bluff Morning-Glory

CRPR 1B.2 - This perennial herb grows in coastal terrace prairie and coastal bluff; however the project area is north of the species’ range. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Campanula californica – Swamp Harebell

CRPR 1B.2 - This species is found in bogs, fens, and other wet meadows in and around coastal prairie, freshwater marsh, closed cone coniferous forest and North Coast coniferous forest. No plants were detected during the botanical survey; however, there is a known occurrence from the Inglenook Fen, which will not be impacted by the proposed project.


Carex californica – California Sedge

CRPR 2.3 - This species is associated with closed cone coniferous forests and occasionally coastal prairies, meadows, marshes, and swamps. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Carex livida – Livid Sedge

CRPR 1A. This species is presumed extinct in California. Habitat for the species is bogs and fens. Although the Inglenook Fen is habitat for the species, no impacts will occur to the fen habitat. No impact.


Carex lenticularis var. limnophila – Lagoon Sedge

CRPR 2.2 - This species is found at lakeshores, beaches (often gravelly), bogs and fens, marshes and swamps, North Coast coniferous forests. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Carex lyngbyei – Lyngbye's Sedge

CRPR 2.2 - This perennial herb is associated with both freshwater and brackish marshes and swamps located at or near sea level. No plants were recorded during the botanical survey. The nearest occurrence is approximately 200 feet from the project area on the south bank of the Ten Mile River near the Hwy 1 Bridge (Maslach 2002). No impact.


Carex saliniformis – Deceiving Sedge

CRPR 1B.2 - This species is found in moist-to-wet open areas in close proximity to the ocean. No plants were detected during the botanical survey; however, there is a known occurrence from the Inglenook Fen, which will not be impacted by the proposed project. No impact.


Carex viridula var. viridula – Green Yellow Sedge

CRPR 2.3 - This species is found in marshes and swamps and wet areas in North Coast coniferous forests. No plants were detected during the botanical survey; however, there is a known occurrence from the Inglenook Fen, which will not be impacted by the proposed project. No impact.


Castilleja affinis ssp. litoralis – Oregon Coast Indian Paintbrush

CRPR 2.2 - This perennial herb inhabits coastal dunes, scrub, and bluff scrub. Habitat for the species occurs in the scrub along the banks of the Ten Mile River; however no occurrences were documented during the botanical survey. No impact.


Castilleja ambigua ssp. humboldtiensis – Humboldt Bay Owl's Clover

CRPR 1B.2 - This species is found in salt marshes. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Castilleja mendocinensis – Mendocino Coast Indian Paintbrush

CRPR 1B.2 - This species occurs on coastal bluffs, scrub, closed cone forests adjacent to the ocean, and coastal prairies. No occurrences were documented from the botanical survey. No impact.


Ceanothus gloriosus var. exaltatus – Glory Bush

CRPR 4.3 - This species is found in chaparral and closed cone coniferous forests. No habitat occurs within the project site. No impact.


Ceanothus gloriosus var. gloriosus – Point Reyes Ceanothus

CRPR 4.3 This species is found on sandy coastal bluff scrub, dunes, and occasionally in closed cone coniferous forests. Marginal habitat occurs in one of the project sites. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Chorizanthe howellii – Howell's Spineflower (spineflower)

CRPR 1B.2, Federally Endangered, California Threatened. This species is found in semi-stabilized soil in sand dunes, coastal bluffs and coastal prairies from the Ten Mile River southward to Glass Beach. Historical occurrences are documented from the Fort Bragg headlands north of Noyo River and the headlands in the vicinity of Jug Handle Creek. The northern portion of the Preserve represents the northernmost occupied habitat for the entire range of the species.


Throughout the Preserve it is often found along the edge of the haul road and in dune mat vegetation community. The haul road edge provides suitable habitat for spineflower because the sand is stabilized by the rocks that comprise the road base. Dominant plants occurring in this habitat are Bromus diandrus, Vulpia myuros, Medicago polymorpha, Rumex acetosella, Daucus pusillus, Polycarpon tetraphyllum, Melilotus indica, Erodium, Hypochaeris radicata, and Artemisia pycnocephala. It was also weakly associated with areas of dead EBG where Plagiobothrys sp. and Gnaphalium sp. dune sage and EBG were dominant plants. In dune mat alliance, spineflower is associated with the Artemisia pycnocephala - Poa douglasii vegetation association where golden aster (Heterotheca sessiliflora ssp. bolanderi) is a dominant component of the plant cover.
The spread of spineflower into suitable habitat in the northern part of the Preserve has been documented by mapping spineflower stands with a GPS to approximately 3.3’,1 m, accuracy in 2001 and 2011 (Figure XX). The total extent of the 2011 spineflower stands along the haul road and Ten Mile River area are approximately 0.14 times greater in area than the 2001 occurrences (from 10.1 acre,4.1 hectares, in 2001 to 11.4 acre,4.6 hectares, in 2011). In the Inglenook Creek area, the 2011 occupied habitat is approximately 4.75 times greater than in 2001(from 0.002acre, 0.001 hectares, in 2001 to 0.124 acre, 0.05 hectares, in 2011).
To accurately assess the potential impacts of the project on spineflower, a project was implemented to sample the spineflower stands from the 2011 mapping effort and estimate the total population in the Preserve. From 425 sampled quadrats, the estimated total population of spineflower greater than 0.28”, 7 mm, occurring in stands greater than 161 ft2, 15 m2, was approximately 1,040,500 ± 3,800 with 95% confidence (Maslach 2011).
The loss of spineflower stands will be mitigated by modifying the project design to retain key segments of stabilized road base, specifically around archaeological sites, seeding suitable habitat where spineflower does not occur, and retreating EBG in spineflower habitat. The removal of the asphalt and the retention of key segments of the haul rock base will minimize impacts to spineflower and provide new habitat immediately adjacent to spineflower stands. These stands will potentially provide a seed source for an increase in numbers and potential expansion into dune swales on the leeward side of the haul road.
A mitigation plan for the protection of impacted stands of spineflower is proposed and included as an appendix. (Map of key segments for retention.)
Clarkia amoena ssp. whitneyi – Whitney's Farewell-To-Spring

CRPR 1B.1 This species is found in coastal bluff scrub and coastal scrub habitats. It is known from the Ten Mile River area near the Hwy 1 Bridge. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Collinsia corymbosa – Round-Headed Chinese Houses

CRPR 1B.2 - This species is found in sand dunes and sandy areas in coastal prairies. Occurrences of this species are primarily found in the southern portion of the Preserve adjacent to the project area. Only marginal habitat occurs in the parking area. Road removal may eventually create habitat for species once foredune European beachgrass is eradicated.


Coptis laciniata – Oregon Goldthread

CRPR 2.2 - This species is often found on streambanks and road cuts in forests. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Erigeron supplex – Supple Daisy

CRPR 1B.2 - This species is found on coastal prairies and coastal bluffs usually in rocky areas with shallow soil. Habitat for this species does not occur within the project site. No impact.


Eryisimum menziesii ssp. menziesii – Menzies' Wallflower (wallflower)

CRPR 1B.1, Federally Endangered, California Endangered. This species is found in sand dunes and sandy areas in coastal bluffs between the Ten Mile River and Pudding Creek. It occurs throughout the project area next to the haul road primarily at the Ten Mile River area, and near Inglenook and Fen Creeks. However most of the wallflower occurs away from the project site.


A study similar to that of the spineflower was undertaken to estimate the population size of wallflower in the Preserve. Wallflower stands were mapped in 2004, 2009, and 2011, with the latter accounting for the most recent mapping in and adjacent to the project area. Where wallflower was mapped 2004 or 2009, the boundaries of the stands were checked in the field in 2011 and modified as needed.
A total count of wallflower was conducted during the botanical survey, which included counting all individuals of wallflower on both sides of the haul road and within 10 m of the edge of the asphalt, or approximate edge if it was buried. Polygons of these areas were digitized into the complied 2011 map of wallflower polygons for later use in assessing areas of project impacts. As proposed, the project would potentially affect approximately 1,171 wallflower individuals by crushing or dislodging.
The population estimate based on the 2011 map of combined mapping was approximately 134,000 plants.
Although the road removal may impact the species, the eventual removal of the road will create habitat for the species. Mitigation for impacts is included as part of the project through road removal and EBG removal, which both impact wallflower.
Erythronium revolutum – Coast Fawn Lily

CRPR 2.2 – This species is found in bogs and fens and upland forests, although the coastal fen is not typical habitat. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Fritillaria roderickii – Roderick's Fritillary

CRPR 1B.1, California Endangered. This species is found in coastal bluff scrub, coastal prairies, and valley and foothill grasslands, usually in clay soils. Habitat for this species does not occur within the project site. No impact.


Gilia capitata ssp. pacifica – Pacific Gilia

CRPR 1B.2 - This species is found in sandy areas in coastal bluff scrub and prairies. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Gilia capitata ssp. chamissonis – Blue Coast Gilia

CRPR 1B.1 – This species is found in coastal scrub and coastal dunes. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Gilia capitata ssp. tomentosa – Wooly-Headed Gilia

CRPR 1B.1 – This species is found in rocky places in coastal scrub. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Gilia millefoliata – Dark-Eyed Gilia

CRPR 1B. This species is found in sand dunes and in sandy areas in coastal bluff scrub and prairies. Plants are known to occur in or near the project area.

A small occurrence of approximately 5 individuals occurs at least 125’ from the edge of the road-removal area. The occurrence is sufficiently far enough from the project activities and no impacts would be expected.
Glyceria grandis – American Manna Grass

CRPR 2.3 - This species is found in bogs and fens, meadows and seeps, and marshes and swamps. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Hemizonia congesta ssp. congesta – Seaside Tarplant

CRPR 1B.2 - This species is found in valley and foothill grasslands. No habitat occurs within the project area. No impact.


Hesperevax sparsiflora ssp. brevifolia – Short-Leaved Evax

CRPR 1B.2 - This annual species is found in coastal bluff scrub, usually in sandy open areas, rocky areas of this soil, or areas where competition from other plants is low, such as trampled areas or other disturbed areas. It occurs in the southern portion of the Preserve, and allthough the edge of the haul road is suitable habitat, no plants were found during the botanical survey. No impact.


Hesperocyparis pygmaeaPygmy Cypress

CRPR 1B.2 - This species is found in closed cone coniferous forests. Habitat for this species does not occur within the project site. No impact.


Horkelia marinensis – Point Reyes Horkelia

CRPR 1B.2 - This perennial herb is found in sandy coastal flats in coastal scrub and prairies. It is known to occur in several locations within and near the Preserve. once occurrence near the Ten Mile R. approximately 100 m from the haul road was found during the survey. The location is downwind of the prevailing winds approximately 100 m from the haul road. Another occurrence at Inglenook Cr. approximately 45 ft. east of the haul road was relocated from previous surveys. The removal of the road berm may have the potential to impact the occurrence.


Horkelia tenuiloba – Thin-Leaved Horkelia

CRPR 1B.2 - This perennial herb is found in sandy areas in upland forests and chaparral. Habitat for this species does not occur within the project site. No impact.


Juncus supiniformis – Hair-Leaved Rush

CRPR 2.2 - This perennial herb is found in bog and fens, marshes and freshwater swamps usually in and around standing water in pygmy forests. Typical habitat for this species does not occur within the project site; however it may occur in the fen, which will not be affected by the project. No impact.


Lasthenia macrantha ssp. bakeri – Baker's Goldfields

CRPR 1B.2 - This perennial herb occurs in grasslands and coastal scrub and openings in closed cone coniferous forests. It is found from Marin to Mendocino Counties along the coast. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Lasthenia californica ssp. macrantha – Perennial Goldfields

CRPR 1B.2 - This species occurs in coastal bluff scrub, coastal dunes, and coastal scrub. Marginal habitat for this species occurs within the project area; however, no plants were encountered in the botanical survey. No impact.


Lasthenia conjugens – Contra Costa Goldfields

CRPR 1B.1, Federally Endangered - This species occurs in woodlands and vernal pools. One occurrence is known from Point Arena, but habitat is not suitable in the project area. No plants were encountered in the botanical survey. No impact.


Lathyrus palustris – scrub, coastal dunes, and coastal scrub. Marginal habitat for this species occurs within the project area; however, no plants were encountered in the botanical survey. No impact.
Lilium maritimum – Coast Lily

CRPR 1B.1 - This perennial bulb generally occurs in closed cone coniferous forests and also occurs in broadleaf upland forests, coastal prairies, coastal scrub, freshwater marshes and swamps, and North Coast coniferous forests. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Lotus formosissimus – Coastal Lotus

CRPR 4. This rhizomatous herb occurs in broadleafed upland forest, coastal bluff scrub, losed-cone coniferous forests, cismontane woodlands, coastal prairies, coastal scrub, eadows and seeps, marshes and swamps, North Coast coniferous forests, wetlands in valley and foothill grasslands, and roadsides. It usually occurs in moist or wet areas in these habitats. No plants were detected during the botanical survey.


Lycopodium clavatum – Running-Pine

CRPR 4.1 - This rhizomatous herb is found in marshes and swamps, lower montane coniferous forests, and wet areas of North Coast coniferous forests, often on edges, openings, and roadsides. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Microseris borealis – Northern Microseris

CRPR 2.1 - This perennial herb occurs in wet meadows and seeps and sphagnum bogs at high elevations. Habitat for this species does not occur within the project site. No impact.


Microseris paludosa – Marsh Microseris

CRPR 1B.2 – Typical habitat for this species is in mesic montane forests and marshes and swamps, usually inland form the coast. One occurrence from the coast at Point Arena is known; however, habitat for this species within the project areas is not likely. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Mitella caulescens – Leafy-Stemmed Mitrewort

CRPR 4.2 -This rhizomatous herb is found in broadleaf upland forests, lower montane coniferous forests, meadows and wet areas in North Coast coniferous forests and alder riparian forests. No habitat occurs in the project area. No impact.


Oenothera wolfii – Wolf's evening-primrose

CRPR 1B.1 - This perennial herb grows in dune swales and partially stabilized areas in the dunes, primarily west of the paved haul road. It occurs adjacent to the haul road in the project area. Some stands may potentially be impacted by project activities and one occurrence on the edges Inglenook Creek downstream of the culvert will be impacted by the removal of the road bed and culvert. Transplanting and seeding are proposed as mitigation measures.


Phacelia insularis var. continentis – North Coast Phacelia

CRPR 1B.2 - This annual herb is found in sand dunes and sandy areas of coastal prairies and bluffs. The plant is known to occur along the south bank of the Ten Mile River close to the project area; however, no plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Pinus contorta ssp. bolanderi – Bolander's Beach Pine

CRPR 1B. This tree species is found in and around the pygmy forest. Habitat for this species does not occur within the project site. No impact.


Pleuropogon hooverianus – North Coast Semaphore Grass

CRPR 1B.1, California Threatened. This California-endemic perennial grass is found in wet open areas of North Coast coniferous forest, broadleaf upland forests, and meadows and seeps from Marin to Mendocino Counties. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Pleuropogon refractus – Nodding Semaphore Grass

CRPR 4.2 - This perennial grass is found in riparian areas in North Coast coniferous forests and in lower montane coniferous forests and meadows. No habitat occurs within the project area. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Puccinellia pumila – Dwarf Alkali Grass

CRPR 2.2 - This perennial grass occurs in coastal salt marshes and swamps. No plants were detected during the botanical survey.


Rhynchospora alba – White-Beaked Rush

CRPR 2.2 - This perennial herb is found in bogs and fens, wet meadows, and freshwater marshes and swamps. It is known from the Inglenook Fen; however, this site is not in the project area. No impact.


Sanguisorba officinalis – Great Burnet

CRPR 2.2 - This perennial herb is found in bogs and fens, wet meadows, marshes and swamps, North Coast coniferous forests, riparian forests and often on serpentine rock. No plants were detected during the botanical survey.


Packera bolanderi var. bolanderiSeacoast Ragwort

CRPR 2.2 - This rhizomatous herb frequently occurs on river banks and rock walls in North Coast coniferous forests and coastal scrub and in moist areas in open forests. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Sidalcea calycosa ssp. rhizomata – Point Reyes Checkerbloom

CRPR 1B.2 - This perennial herb is found in freshwater marshes and swamps near the coast. The project area is not typical wetland habitat for the species. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Sidalcea malachroides – Maple-Leaved Checkerbloom

CRPR 4.2 - This perennial herb is found in broadleaf upland forest, coastal prairies, coastal scrub, and north coast coniferous forests often in disturbed areas. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Sidalcea malviflora ssp. patula – Siskiyou Checkerbloom

CRPR 1B.2 - This perennial herb is found along the coast in broadleaf upland forests and coastal prairies. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Sidalcea malviflora ssp. purpurea – Purple-Stemmed Checkerbloom

CRPR 1B.2 - This perennial herb is found along the coast in broadleaf upland forests and coastal prairies. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Triquetrella californica – Coastal Triquetrella

CRPR 1B.2 - This moss is found on soil in coastal bluff scrub and coastal scrub. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Usnea longissima – Long-Beard Lichen

No official status, but considered rare locally and indicative of older coniferous forests. This lichen is found in semi-open forests in a variety of coniferous forests. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.


Veratrum fimbriatum – Fringed False-Hellebore

CRPR 4.3 - This perennial herb is found in bogs and fens, and wet areas in coastal scrub, meadows, and North Coast coniferous forests. Plants occur in the Inglenook Fen, which will not be impacted by the project. No impact.


Viola palustris – Marsh Violet

CRPR 2.2 - This rhizomatous herb is found in coastal bogs and fens and wet areas in coastal scrub. No plants were detected during the botanical survey. No impact.



Special-Status and Other Natural Plant Communities
The California Department of Fish and Game defines special status natural communities:

“Special status natural communities are communities that are of limited distribution statewide or within a county or region and are often vulnerable to environmental effects of projects. These communities may or may not contain special status species or their habitat. The most current version of the Department’s List of California Terrestrial Natural Communities indicates which natural communities are of special status given the current state of the California classification.


Most types of wetlands and riparian communities are considered special status natural communities due to their limited distribution in California. These natural communities often contain special status plants such as those described above. These protocols may be used in conjunction with protocols formulated by other agencies, for example, those developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to delineate jurisdictional wetlands8 or by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to survey for the presence of special status plants (CDFG 2010).”
A scoping list of rare vegetation communities with the potential for occurrence in the project area was derived from a state-wide list (CDFG 2010) (Appendix XX). Vegetation communities were identified in the field using the “Manual of California Vegetation, 2nd ed.” (Sawyer et al. 2009) during field surveys and mapped to associations where possible. Where vegetation did not clearly fit into a documented vegetation alliance, it was described using the dominant plant species. This was applied to four vegetation communities: Schoenoplectus pungens, Equisetum hyemale ssp. affine, Artemisia pycnocephala - roadside weeds, and Gnaphalium spp. However, where they were similar to another documented vegetation community, this was noted in the table and description below.

Vegetation communities were mapped by using a combination of walking the perimeter with a GPS and digitizing from aerial photographs (USDA 2010).


A list and description of vegetation communities documented in the project area follows.
Table XX. List of Vegetation Communities in the Project Area

Alliance

Association

Rank

Hectares

Vegetation Communities or Land Surface without Rarity Ranking

Not Listed

Asphalt

None

1.29

Not Listed

Water

None

0.10

Not Listed

Open Sand

None

105.68

Ammophila arenaria (European beach grass swards) Semi-natural Stands

Ammophila arenaria

None

27.71

Not Listed

Gnaphalium spp.

None

5.58

Holcus lanatus - Anthoxanthum odoratum (Common velvet grass - sweet vernal grass meadows) Semi-natural Stands

Holcus lanatus - Anthoxanthum odoratum

None

0.85

Eucalyptus (globulus, camaldulensis) (Eucalyptus groves) Semi-natural Stands

Eucalyptus globulus

None

5.99

Vegetation Communities or Land Surface without Rarity Ranking

Not Listed

(Coastal Brackish Marsh)

Schoenoplectus pungens

(G2 S2.1)

0.55

Scirpus microcarpus (Small-fruited bulrush marsh) Alliance

Scirpus microcarpus

G4 S2

0.003

Carex obnupta (Slough sedge swards) Alliance

Carex obnupta

G4 S3

1.46

Argentina egedii (Pacific silverweed marshes) Alliance

Argentina egedii

G4 S2

0.10

Juncus lescurii (Salt rush swales) Alliance

Juncus lescurii

G3 S2?

12.16

Not Listed

(Abronia latifolia - Ambrosia chamissonis (Dune mat) Alliance)

Equisetum hyemale ssp. affine

(Ambrosia chamissonis - Abronia latifolia)

None

(G3 S3)

4.71

Leymus mollis (Sea lyme grass patches) Alliance

Leymus mollis

G4 S2

0.02




Leymus mollis - Abronia latifolia - (Cakile sp.)

-

0.13

Abronia latifolia - Ambrosia chamissonis (Dune mat) Alliance

Ambrosia chamissonis - Abronia latifolia

G3 S3

66.93




Abronia latifolia - Ambrosia chamissonis - Cakile maritima

-

7.42




Artemisia pycnocephala - Poa douglasii

-

16.64




Artemisia pycnocephala - Calystegia soldanella

-

1.57

Not Listed

Artemisia pycnocephala - roadside weeds

-

1.06

Garrya elliptica (Coastal silk tassel scrub) Provisional Alliance

Garrya elliptica

G3? S3?

0.91

Morella californica (Wax myrtle scrub) Alliance

Morella californica

G3 S3

0.99

Salix hookeriana (Coastal dune willow thickets) Alliance

Salix hookeriana

G4 S3

0.00

Salix sitchensis (Sitka willow thickets) Provisional Alliance

Salix sitchensis

G4 S3?

5.51

Pinus contorta var. contorta (Beach pine forest) Alliance

Pinus contorta var. c.

G5 S3

0.20

Pinus muricata (Bishop pine forest) Alliance

Pinus muricata

G3 S3

0.21

Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   14




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©muhaz.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə