Grading policy



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SCIENCE
Course Grade Level Duration Credit Prerequisite _____

Earth Systems-B 09 Basic 2 Sems 1.0 None

Earth Systems-R 09 Regular 2 Sems 1.0 None

Life Science-B 10,11,12 Basic 2 Sems 1.0 Full credit in Earth Systems

Biology R 10,11 Regular 2 Sems 1.0 Full credit in Earth Systems

Explore/Chem & Physics R 11,12 Regular 2 Sems 1.0 Successful completion of two years of science

Chemistry 1 R 11,12 Regular 2 Sems 1.0 Full credit in both Biology and Algebra 1 or Dept. consent

Physics R 11,12 Regular 2 Sems 1.0 Full credit in Biology and completion or

concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2

Anatomy/Physiology 1 R 11,12 Regular 2 Sems 1.0 Full credit in, or concurrent enrollment with,

Chemistry 1

Earth/Environmental Sci. H 09 Honors 2 Sems 1.0 Science Dept. recommendation

Biology H 10,11 Honors 2 Sems 1.0 Full credit in Earth Systems or Earth/Environ.

Science-H and Dept. consent

Chemistry 1 H 11,12 Honors 2 Sems 1.0 Full credit in both Biology and Alg. 1, concurrent enrollment with Alg. 2, and Dept. consent

Physics H 11,12 Honors 2 Sems 1.0 Full credit in Biology and completion or

concurrent enrollment in Alg. 2 H, Dept. consent

Chemistry 2 R 12 Regular 2 Sems 1.0 Full credit in Chemistry 1

EARTH SYSTEMS B Credit: 1.0

Level: Basic

Open To: Freshmen

Prerequisite: None


This course is an introductory course in the physical and environmental sciences. The topics include: measurement, atmosphere, astronomy and planetary sciences, geology, ecology, and pollution. Students will familiarize themselves with experimental design, data analysis, and laboratory techniques by studying various units. The class will explore various environmental problems, and the students will create a research plan to explore one of them and carry it out under the guidance of the teacher.
EARTH SYSTEMS R Credit: 1.0

Level: Regular

Open To: Freshmen

Prerequisite: None


This course is an introductory course in the physical and environmental sciences. The topics include: measurement, atmosphere, astronomy and planetary sciences, geology, ecology, and pollution. Students will familiarize themselves with experimental design, data analysis, and laboratory techniques within the various units. Every student in this course will design, conduct, and present a self-directed research project.
LIFE SCIENCE B Credit: 1.0

Level: Basic

Open To: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

Prerequisite: Full credit in Earth Systems


This course is a basic, survey course in biology. Students will study living things from a cellular to an organismal level. Lab activities will be an important part of the course.
BIOLOGY R Credit: 1.0

Level: Regular

Open To: Sophomores, Juniors

Prerequisite: Full credit in Earth Systems


Biology is the study of living things, both plant and animal. This study involves the anatomy and physiology as well as the ecology of living organisms. Microscopic cellular structures are also covered. Laboratory work accompanies most units. These labs involve dissection of animals, experiments, field trips, and microscopic work. Biology will give the student a better understanding of health and conservation, and a good insight into many kinds of occupations.

EXPLORATIONS IN CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS R Credit: 1.0

Level: Regular

Open To: Juniors, Seniors

Prerequisite: Successful completion of two years of science
A semester of chemistry will be covered where students will examine the composition of matter and the changes it undergoes, and a semester of physics will be covered where the students will study matter and energy.

CHEMISTRY 1 R Credit: 1.0

Level: Regular

Open To: Juniors, Seniors

Prerequisite: Full credit in both Biology and Algebra 1 or Department consent
This course studies the structure and composition of matter and the changes it undergoes. Instruction includes units on matter, atomic theory, chemical equations and reactions, gases, solutions, acids and bases, and organic chemistry. Laboratory work accompanies each unit. This course is designed for college-bound students.
PHYSICS R Credit: 1.0

Level: Regular

Open To: Juniors, Seniors

Prerequisite: Full credit in Biology and completion or concurrent enrollment in Alg. 2


Physics R is a conceptually based study of matter and energy, which seeks to explain the behavior and interrelationships of matter and energy in the universe. Topics studied included motion, forces, momentum, rotational motion, work, energy, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and relativity. It is strongly recommended that students taking this course have a firm understanding in algebra and geometry.
ANATOMY/PHYSIOLOGY 1 R Credit: 1.0

Level: Regular

Open To: Juniors, Seniors

Prerequisite: Full credit in, or concurrent enrollment with, Chemistry 1


This course covers the anatomy and physiology of the human body. It is an interesting and very valuable course for anyone interested in health, medicine, dentistry, physical therapy, lab technology, X-ray technology, and a host of other occupations. Laboratory work accompanies many units.
EARTH/ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE H

Level: Honors

Open To: Freshmen

Prerequisite: Department recommendation


This course is an all-inclusive course where observation and study of natural phenomena help students understand the origin and evolution of biology, chemistry, and physics. Students will learn about the history of the Earth, Earth’s systems, weather, and climate, space systems, and human impacts. As an honors level course, students will be expected to complete an independent research project for submission to the Illinois Junior Academy of Science Competition. In addition, the human impacts portion of the course will follow the advance placement environmental science curriculum.
BIOLOGY H Credit: 1.0

Level: Honors

Open To: Sophomores, Juniors

Prerequisite: Earth Systems or Earth/Environmental Science H and Department consent


Biology is the study of life and living things. This course is designed to teach students how scientists learn about living things by doing some of the things that scientists do. This means that there will be laboratory work, some of which the students will have to plan themselves with the assistance of the teacher. Students should learn to draw conclusions from the results of their own experiments, as well as learning to draw conclusions from the results of other people's experiments. That is one of the differences between this course and the regular level course. In addition, this course includes more abstract ideas than the regular level offering.
CHEMISTRY 1 H Credit: 1.0

Level: Honors

Open To: Juniors, Seniors

Prerequisite: Full credit in both Biology and Algebra 1, concurrent enrollment w/Alg. 2, and Department consent


This fast-paced, in-depth study of matter and the changes it undergoes is designed to prepare students to continue into college programs in science, engineering, and medicine. Students will study atoms, molecules, and their reactions in a highly quantitative manner. Lab work is an integral part of this course. Strong mathematics preparation is desired.
PHYSICS H Credit: 1.0

Level: Honors

Open To: Juniors, Seniors

Prerequisite: Full credit in Biology and completion or concurrent enrollment in Alg. 2 H, and Department consent


Honors Physics proceeds at a faster pace than the regular level course and expands on concepts with in-depth mathematics. Topics studied include motion, forces, momentum, rotational motion, work, energy, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, nuclear physics and relativity. A firm grasp of algebra and geometry is essential, and it is strongly recommended that the student has taken or is currently enrolled in trigonometry.
CHEMISTRY 2 R Credit: 1.0

Level: Regular

Open To: Seniors

Prerequisite: Full credit in Chemistry 1


This offering is an advanced course in chemistry. In this course you will be expected to recall and apply the content from Chemistry 1 in order to move into advanced topics. The advanced topics are rooted in the basics of Chemistry 1. You need a thorough understanding of topics from Chemistry 1 before moving into topics such as intermolecular forces, thermochemistry, gases, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, precipitation reactions, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, and qualitative analysis. You will be expected to apply the scientific method in the laboratory.
SOCIAL SCIENCE
Course Grade Level Duration Credit Prerequisite ____

Global Studies R 09,10 Regular 1 Sem 0.5 None

World Cultures R 09,10 Regular 1 Sem 0.5 None

Western Civilization R 10 Regular 2 Sems 1.0 None

Western Civilization H 10 Honors 2 Sems 1.0 Full credit in English 1 H, Dept. approval

based on administered writing prompt

U.S. History R 11 Regular 2 Sems 1.0 Full credit in social science

A.P. U.S. History H 11,12 Honors 2 Sems 1.0 Full credit in social science, Dept. consent, and Guidance recommendation

Civics R 11,12 Regular 1 Sem 1.0 None

Contemporary World Problems R 11,12 Regular 1 Sem 0.5 None (See link (http://bit.ly/YUZrZk) for

(Online Course) hardware, software, & tech skills required.)

Introduction to Psychology R 11,12 Regular 1 Sem 0.5 None

Recent U.S. History (RUSH) R 12 Regular 1 Sem 0.5 None


GLOBAL STUDIES R Credit: 0.5

Level: Regular

Open To: Freshmen, Sophomores

Prerequisite: None


The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with major countries of the world with special emphasis on the Western world. Points of emphasis include Europe, North America, and the Middle East. The students will also familiarize themselves with geography, religion, economic systems, and governmental ideals. A study of maps will help acquaint the students with all of these areas. Discussions on current events are also presented.
WORLD CULTURES R

Level: Regular

Open To: Freshmen, Sophomores

Prerequisite: None


This is a social science course with emphasis on countries in Central America, South America, Africa, East Asia, and Oceania. The class will participate in an in-depth study of geography and cultural diversity. The class will analyze each country’s relationships with those in their region, as well as the United States. Current events will be researched and discussed daily.
WESTERN CIVILIZATION R Credit: 1.0

Level: Regular

Open To: Sophomores

Prerequisite: None


This course is a chronological study of the history of western civilization focusing on the time period from the end of the Middle Ages to the present.  The purpose of this class is to familiarize students with the political, economical, and social histories, which constitute the western heritage.  Successful completion of this course, or honors Western Civilization, is required for graduation.
WESTERN CIVILIZATION H Credit: 1.0

Level: Honors

Open To: Sophomores

Prerequisite: Full credit in English 1 H, Dept. approval based on administered writing prompt


This course is designed to study the chronology of western civilization for students who have the desire to enter into AP US History their junior year.  Students will analyze the unique events and system that constitute the western tradition, concentrating on political, economical, and social history.  Placement in this course will be decided by faculty based on successful completion of an administered writing prompt, student performance on prior standardized tests, and the student's level of success in honors English 1.  Successful completion of this course, or regular Western Civilization, is required for graduation.

U.S. HISTORY R Credit: 1.0

Level: Regular

Open To: Juniors

Prerequisite: Full credit in a social science course
This course is a chronological study of American history from the revolutionary period to the civil rights movement.  Students will discuss key periods in the American experience that have shaped our laws, morals, and everyday lives.  The students will be asked to study the causes and effects of major social and political issues that have molded America.  Students will also take the Constitution test required for graduation in this course.  Successful completion of this course, or AP US History, is required for graduation.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT (A.P.) U.S. HISTORY H (Additional Expense) Credit: 1.0

Level: Honors

Open To: Juniors, Seniors

Prerequisite: Full credit in social science, Department consent, and Guidance recommendation


Students will be expected to perform at the college level in terms of workload and materials. The course is a study of the major themes of American history starting with the founding of the first colonies to the 1980's. The course is structured to prepare the student for the A.P. examination and the rigors of the workload of college. Students will also take the Constitution test required for graduation in this course.  Successful completion of this course, or regular US History, is required for graduation.
CIVICS R Credit: 0.5

Level: Regular

Open To: Juniors, Seniors

Prerequisite: None


Civics is the study of the Federalist government structure, law, and the Constitution. The citizenship test, which is required for graduation by state law, will be administered during this class. The course will emphasize state and local government, as well as citizenship. This course is a graduation requirement.
CONTEMPORARY WORLD PROBLEMS R (Online course) Credit: 0.5

Level: Regular

Open To: Juniors, Seniors

Prerequisite: None (See link (http://bit.ly/YUZrZk) for hardware, software, and technological skills required)


This course is designed to enlarge the student's knowledge of current world affairs.  The course has three overreaching themes:  financial investing, terrorism, and politics and elections.  In addition, the course will focus on daily current events. 

This course will be delivered through an online system where students will be able to access, manipulate, and submit content from anywhere they can plug into the Internet.  The students in the course will physically meet for a few days at the start of the course to orientate students with the Course Management System, then will meet one day per week, TBA.  Otherwise, they are free to complete course work anywhere they can, as long as they meet the deadlines established in the course framework.


INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY R Credit: 0.5

Level: Regular

Open To: Juniors, Seniors

Prerequisite: None


This is a college-oriented elective course designed to help students understand human behavior. The focus is on the scientific study of human development, learning, motivation, personality, mental disorders, and therapy. Students develop some basic concepts of psychology and a historical perspective on psychology as the study of individual behavior. They study the contributions of scholars in the field, including Sigmund Freud, Abraham Maslow, Ivan Pavlov, Carl Rogers, and B.F. Skinner. Students also have opportunities to explore implications for everyday life of a scientific perspective on human behavior and learn about the various careers associated with this field of study.

RECENT U.S. HISTORY (RUSH) R Credit: 0.5

Level: Regular

Open To: Seniors

Prerequisite: None
This course is for seniors who are interested in the American society and its ever-changing influence on today’s world. The course is centered around major events in American society since 1945. Students will become aware of social issues that affect their lives now and in the future.

GRUNDY AREA VOCATIONAL CENTER
GENERAL INFORMATION
GAVC is the result of a cooperative agreement among the high schools of Coal City, Gardner-South Wilmington, Minooka and Morris. By joining together in a centralized vocational program, the participating schools now offer their students a variety of quality vocational training in an efficient manner.
GAVC serves a dual purpose. First, it prepares students to enter the labor market with beginning occupational skills and prepares them for advanced occupational training in junior colleges, four-year colleges, or technical schools. Secondly, it helps meet the increasing needs of area business and industry for skilled personnel.
The charge for a student to take one class at GAVC this year was approximately $2,575. This fee is paid by MCHS. If a student drops this class at any time after the 3rd day of school, the parents will be charged the cost of the remaining unused portion of the school year.
If a student elects to take a second GAVC class during the same school year, parents will be charged the approximate amount of $1,287 for the second class. This payment will not be refunded if the student drops the class any time after the 3rd day of school.
Each class at GAVC does have a fee requirement. These fees are charges to the student and are paid directly to GAVC.

Each GAVC class taken by a student has a certification fee of $100.00 payable to MCHS. This is in addition to other MCHS fees.


STUDENT INFORMATION
Students interested in applying for admission to the Center should contact their home school guidance counselor. To be considered, students must:
1. Be from one of the participating high schools.

2. Be juniors or seniors during the school year.

3. Complete an application form.


  1. 4. Be recommended by their home school.


MORRIS COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL PREREQUISITES


  1. No more than 9 absences by the end of the first semester of the current year.

  2. No major discipline infractions.

  3. Must have 8 credits by the end of the first semester and 11 credits by the end of the second semester of their sophomore year.



SCHOOL SCHEDULE
Except for Cosmetology students, every student will be attending GAVC during one of these three sessions:
Early: 6:50 a.m. to 8:35 a.m.

First: 8:40 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Second: 10:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Third: 1:10 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.


CREDITS
Each member school calculates credits in a manner that reflects its graduation requirements. Credits granted by MCHS are 2.0 per year for the majority of the courses.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Most of the vocational programs at GAVC are two years in length. Students receive approximately 110 minutes of training each school day or a total of 645 hours of preparation over a two-year period. One exception is the cosmetology program. Students in the cosmetology program receive four hours of classroom and practical experience each day.

GAVC COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
AUTO TECHNOLOGY 1

Open To: Juniors, Seniors

Prerequisite: None
This course is National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accredited. The course covers shop orientation and safety procedures including use of the lifts and hand tools. The core content will focus on tire repair and replacement procedures, vehicle fluid services, basic brake system service and operation, steering and suspension service with alignments, basic automotive electrical system operation and repair, and engine performance diagnostic procedures. Students will have the opportunity to learn about engine disassembly and reassembly as well as theory of operations.
AUTO TECHNOLOGY 2

Open To: Seniors

Prerequisite: Auto Mechanics 1 with a C grade or better
This course focuses on advanced automotive systems and service procedures. It will go more in depth in diagnosing and repairing vehicles and repairing vehicle faults created by the instructors. This course will also go more in depth in braking systems to include anti-lock brakes and brake boosters. Students will diagnose alignment issues and perform alignment work on customer vehicles. Second year students will have a larger focus on engine performance diagnosis covering everything from fuel, ignition, exhaust, starting and charging, and emission system diagnosis and repair. Air bag and passenger restraint system safety and procedures will also be covered along with advanced electrical diagnostics with vehicle computer systems and components. Student will have an opportunity to earn the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Maintenance & Light Duty Repair Certificate upon successfully passing the test.
College Credits may be earned during this program through Joliet Junior College. Disclaimer - Dual credit is subject to change based upon revisions made from Joliet Junior College. GAVC has no control over this entity.
FIRE SCIENCE 1

Open To: Juniors, Seniors

Prerequisite: None
The Fire Science I course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the fire protection career field and to prepare the fire science student for entry into the Fire Science II program. It is, further, intended to prepare the student for entry into a State approved firefighter certification program and/or a college or university Fire Technology degree program.

The curriculum is based on the standards established by the Illinois State Board of Education, the Illinois State Fire Marshal’s office, the National Fire Protection Association, the National Fire Academy, the Department of Transportation, the Department of Public Health, and the Fire and Emergency Services National Professional Development Model. Students will learn about a variety of career choices available within the field of fire protection, and the knowledge, skills and abilities, which are required of each.

The course of study will include the following domains: Basic First-Aid and CPR (2 credits); Orientation and Organization; Fire Hose; Fire Streams; Firefighter Safety and Health; Firefighter Personal Protective Equipment; Water Supply; Fire Department Communications; Fire Behavior; Building Construction; Portable Fire Extinguishers; Ground Ladders; Fire Control; Introduction to Hazardous Materials; the Incident Command System; Work Ethic; and Human Relations.
FIRE SCIENCE 2

Open To: Seniors

Prerequisite: Fire Science 1 with a C grade or better
The Fire Science II course is designed to provide a solid foundation of knowledge and skills to prepare the fire science student for entry into a State approved firefighter certification program and/or a college or university Fire Technology degree program. It is, further, intended to prepare the student for the annual Skills USA competition. 

The curriculum is based on the standards established by the Illinois State Board of Education, the Illinois State Fire Marshal’s office, the National Fire Protection Association, the National Fire Academy, the Department of Transportation, the Department of Public Health, and the Fire and Emergency Services National Professional Development Model. Students will expand upon the knowledge and skills acquired during the Fire Science I program and gain technical proficiency through hands-on application and repetitive drills.

This advanced course of study will include the following domains: Ropes & Knots; Fire Control; Loss Control; Ventilation; Protecting Fire Scene Evidence; Fire Prevention & Public Education; Rescue & Extrication; Forcible Entry; Fire Detection, Alarm, and Suppression Systems; Basic Pre-hospital Emergency Medical Care; Hazardous Materials Operations; Firefighter Safety & Health; Incident Command; and Employability Skills. This course emphasizes skill development in the operation of firefighting tools and equipment in order to develop psychomotor skills (Job Performance Requirements) and physical strength and endurance.



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