I. Introduction Loss Prevention Surveys



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Smoking Policy

Smoking is the number one cause of accidental fires. For this reason, the hotel should

establish a specific smoking policy. Smoking should be allowed in designated areas

only. This helps to ensure a safe working environment. Employees should be informed

at the time of orientation where the designated smoking areas are and when they may use

them. If the smoking area is outside of the hotel, consideration should be given to

providing the employees with some level of protection from the environment.

Employees should be informed that the smoking policy is not designed to inconvenience

smokers or to isolate them from other employees, rather it has been established to save

lives and property.



Employee Procedures & Controls

II-32


Serving of Alcohol

Due to the effects of alcohol upon a person’s judgment and activities, reasonable care

should be taken with the service of alcohol. Training programs for servers should be

established. The following guidelines should be considered in any training program:



  • Clearly state all laws that govern the sale of alcohol in the local jurisdiction.

  • Explain the physiological effects of alcohol on the human body.

  • Explain characteristics of minors attempting to be served liquor including proper public

  • relations approaches in requesting identification and how to determine the legitimacy of

  • identification provided.

  • Explain the signals of possible intoxication and how to recognize them.

  • Review techniques for intervention with guests when alcohol service should be stopped

  • in the opinion of the server.

Hotels serving alcohol need to be aware of the risk associated with what is often referred to

as “Dram Shop” litigation.

“Dram Shop” (an old English term for a pub) involves a civil complaint alleging that a

business “illegally” served alcohol to an individual who then (as a direct result of having

been “illegally” served alcohol) caused another person to experience suffering or loss. An

example of such a lawsuit could involve an individual claiming loss as the result of your

hotel having “illegally” served alcohol to their spouse who, while driving under the

influence, was permanently disabled in a automobile accident.



Demonstrating Compliance with the Law

You can defend yourself in a “Dram Shop” lawsuit by demonstrating to a judge and jury

that you consistently provide alcohol in a responsible and legal manner. Examples are:


  • Written policies concerning the sale/distribution of alcohol.

  • Evidence of training provided to hotel wait staff concerning the sale of alcohol.

  • Evidence of enforcement of policies concerning sale of alcohol.

A written policy on the service of alcohol should be developed for your hotel. All

training should be documented and a copy placed in the employees' personnel file. A

shift activity log should be completed after every shift. The log should be used to

document unusual activity, such as denying service to a minor or refusing to serve

additional alcohol to a patron who is obviously intoxicated. If no unusual activity

occurred, the log should still be completed and indicate the lack of activity. A sample log

is included in the appendix.
Employee Procedures & Controls

II-33


(SAMPLE)

Written Policy concerning the Sale/Distribution of Alcohol

1. Alcohol will be served only to those patrons who can provide some form of photo

bearing identification that provides the patron’s date of birth. Under no circumstance will

alcohol be served to any person who cannot provide the required identification. ALL



PATRONS WILL BE REQUIRED TO PROVIDE PHOTO BEARING

IDENTIFICATION.

2. Alcohol will be served only to those patrons who are of legal age.

3. Alcohol will not be served to any individual who appears to be intoxicated.

4. All members of the wait staff are empowered to terminate the sale of alcohol to any

individual they reasonably suspect is intoxicated.

5. All members of the wait staff are to immediately advise their supervisor and all

bartenders concerning their decision to terminate service to any person they have reason

to believe is intoxicated.

6. Once communicated, the decision by the waiter/waitress to terminate service will be

enforced by all members of the hotel staff. No one is authorized to countermand or

reverse the decision to terminate the sale of alcohol to a person they suspect is

intoxicated.

7. The waiter/waitress terminating service of alcohol will prepare a hotel security incident

report documenting the events and circumstances precipitating their decision to terminate

the sale of alcohol. This report will be completed before the waiter/waitress leaves the

hotel. The MOD will also note in the MOD Log/Daily Report that service was

terminated to a patron suspected of being underage or intoxicated.

8. “Double” shots of alcohol are strictly prohibited.

9. Patrons may order no more than one drink at a time per person.

10. Any type of “Special” alcohol sale is prohibited. There will be no “Two-For-One”

specials or reduced price special sales such as “Quarter Beer” night.

11. Bartenders are specifically prohibited from mixing any "custom" drinks that require more

than the customary amount of alcohol contained in a single "jigger" type liquormeasuring

device.


12. All alcohol will be routinely inventoried and stored in compliance with current alcohol

control policies.



Employee Procedures & Controls

II-34


Employee Training Records:

It will be important that you are able to demonstrate that you had provided all employees

who serve alcohol with:


  • Specific instruction concerning the above listed policies, and;

  • Information detailing how they are to determine if a patron is “obviously

  • intoxicated”.

A copy of the hotel alcohol sales policy should be signed by all alcohol servers and

placed in their personnel or training file.

All employees who may serve alcohol should be trained and certified through a third

party alcohol server program. This type of training can be obtained through programs

such as the “TIPS” (Training for Intervention ProcedureS) or “CARE” (Controlling

Alcohol Risks Effectively).

This training functions to provide a clear understanding of what constitutes “obviously

intoxicated” and how to identify someone who is intoxicated. The training also provides

strategies for dealing with a potentially intoxicated patron.

For information concerning the TIPS program, call 1-800-GET-TIPS. For information

concerning the CARE program call 1-800-752-4567.


Sale/Distribution of Alcohol Claims

“Dram Shop” claims are refuted by demonstrating, as a matter of standard operating

procedure, that the hotel refuses service to underage persons and terminates service to

intoxicated persons. Any incident or event resulting in refusal to serve or termination of

service should be documented as a hotel security incident.

This report should be prepared by the member of the wait staff terminating service and

should be completed before that person leaves the property. The report should contain

the date, time, location and name of the wait staff member and if possible, the name and

room number of the patron being denied service. The report should contain a brief

synopsis of why the wait staff member terminated service and a copy of the receipt

documenting the sale of alcohol to the terminated patron should be attached to the report.

As a supporting document, and for reference purposes, the MOD Log/Daily Report

should also be used to document any incident involving the refusal or termination of

service to a patron suspected of being intoxicated. The MOD Log/Daily Report should

reference the hotel incident report prepared by the member of the wait staff terminating

service.


These reports should be routinely reviewed by management and archived as potential

evidence.



Employee Procedures & Controls

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Employee Accidents & Illnesses

Only qualified personnel should administer first aid to an employee who is injured or ill.

An employee who is seriously injured should be transported immediately by ambulance to

the nearest emergency room. If the injury is not serious, the employee should be taken by

taxi to the nearest emergency room or the hotel doctor. The next of kin should be notified

whenever an employee is admitted to the hospital.

When applicable, a worker's compensation form should be completed and an accident

investigation should be conducted. OSHA records should also be updated. If the injury was

caused by defects in equipment or building construction, these problems should be

corrected as soon as possible. If three or more employees are hospitalized due to one

accident, or an accident results in the death of an employee, OSHA must be notified at 1-

800-321-OSHA.

All hotels should carefully evaluate each employee accident. This procedure will help the

hotel identify any pattern or circumstance that caused the accident. Steps can then be taken

to eliminate the causes and reduce the potential for future accidents to occur.

The accident investigation form included in this manual can be used as a written report of

the accident. The form is designed to provide enough details so a series of accidents over a

period of time can be analyzed with specific trends noted.

A member of the Safety Committee should conduct the investigation. When the accident

involves medical treatment for the employee, the employee’s supervisor should conduct the

investigation.

If possible, the investigation should be completed as soon as possible after the accident,

while the facts can still be remembered accurately. The investigation should be conducted

at the location of the accident so a comparison can be made between the individual's report

of the facts and the physical conditions present.

Always call the Loss Prevention Department at 1-800-RISKMGT or 770-604-5960 to

report the injury with all pertinent information.

The following guidelines can be used to obtain information for the accident report:



  • Do not suggest blame.

  • Do not ask leading questions. Let the employee tell what happened in his or her own

  • words.

  • Remember that the person being questioned may have reasons for concealing the facts.

  • Try to determine the true cause of the accident.

  • Determine exactly what the employee was doing when he or she became injured.

  • Find out if the employee was following the safety practices and procedures established

  • for the department.


Employee Procedures & Controls

II-36


  • Consider other persons involved in the accident, or any unusual work conditions

  • present at the time of the accident, such as a very busy shift or a short staff.

  • Obtain a sketch or photograph of the accident location if it is appropriate.

  • The goal of the investigation should be to determine the proximate cause of the

  • accident and to prevent a reoccurrence.

In addition, the person completing the report should avoid using the term "carelessness" as

a description of the cause of the accident. The investigation report should provide specific

facts that can be related directly to the accident.

The completed accident investigation report should be given to the Safety Committee for

review. A representative of the Safety Committee should meet with the General Manager

as soon as possible to discuss any recommendations that should be implemented. The

accident report should also be discussed during the next regularly scheduled Safety

Committee meeting.



Employee Procedures & Controls

II-37


Death of an Employee

Upon receiving a call about a possible death of an employee at the hotel, the manager on

duty should respond to the location with first-aid equipment, and, if available, personnel

qualified to administer first aid. Call an ambulance and instruct the operator to also notify

the local police authorities.

Instruct the security officer or manager on duty to seal off the area. Do not attempt to clean



up the area or remove anything from the scene until given permission by the local

authorities. If the accident is a result of a work-related injury, notify the nearest OSHA

office within 8 hours by calling 800-321-OSHA and report the employee’s death.

Normally, the local police authorities handle notification of next of kin. However, there

may be cases where the General Manager will want to fill this role. If it is felt that a

physician, minister, or family friend should be present when the next of kin is informed.

The General Manager should make these arrangements.

For assistance in public relations, refer to the section concerning dealing with the media.

Depending upon the severity of the accident, some employees may require counseling.

For assistance in arranging counseling, contact the company’s Employee Assistance

Program (EAP), Medical Management Company, or other mental health professional.

Counseling may or may not be covered under Worker’s Compensation depending upon

local jurisdiction.

Additionally, report this death immediately by telephone to the Risk Management

Department by calling 800-RISKMGT or 770-604-5960.



Employee Procedures & Controls

II-38


Drug Testing

To deter drug use among the hotel staff, the hotel should consider the use of preemployment

and post-accident drug screening. Although extremely effective in minimizing

drug activity on the property, the program may be administered with caution to avoid

policies or practices that can potentially result in claims of discrimination. Local laws

should be thoroughly reviewed by SCH Legal before implementing a drug-testing program.

Recent studies have shown a significant return on investment for implemented drug

screening programs by reducing employee health care costs, increasing productivity,

reducing time away from work, improving absenteeism and tardiness, reducing work related

injuries and increasing employee morale/motivation.

JANKO HOSPITALITY LLCHuman Resource’s Department should be contacted for

additional information on the drug testing program.



Employee Procedures & Controls

II-39


ADA

Hotels in the U.S. should adhere to the standards set forth in the Americans With

Disabilities Act (ADA). The ADA provides individuals with disabilities the right to

participate in and enjoy the goods, services, privileges, benefits and accommodations

offered to the general public. It also provides access to employment opportunities offered

to the general public. In addition, it requires businesses to provide barrier free accessibility

to all public accommodations and commercial facilities.

A hotel should take such steps necessary so as to ensure that individuals with disabilities

are not excluded, denied services, segregated or otherwise treated differently because of the

absence of auxiliary aids and services. A hotel may choose between various alternative

aids, provided the result is effective.

Special consideration should be provided to any person with an apparent or stated

disability. These considerations range from structural modifications for the removal of

barriers, to employee sensitivity training on how to serve disabled guests.

A primary concern should be to develop a system to alert the hotel staff of the presence and

location of disabled persons on the property when an emergency arises. The following is

suggested:


  • Computerized property management systems should develop a special code that can be

  • entered onto a guest's folio display. At any given time a report can be run requesting all

  • disabled guests who are registered, along with the type of disability they have. In

  • manual systems, a discreet marker can be placed on the rack registration card to flag a

  • disabled person's presence.

  • The telephone operator, director of security and emergency response leaders should be

  • notified by the front office immediately upon the check-in of a disabled guest, along

  • with their expected departure date. Any change to the guest's status i.e. room number,

  • departure, date, etc. should be communicated immediately.

  • Other considerations provided for disabled patrons should include:

  • Accessible rooms should be the last rooms rented to help ensure availability.

  • A list of all handicapped accessible rooms should be maintained at the front desk and

  • PBX.

  • When possible, disabled persons should be roomed on the lower floors.

  • Elevator landings and elevator cabs should be provided with floor, door open, door

  • close, and alarm bells with a designation in Braille

Employee Procedures & Controls

II-40


  • Special devices for disabled persons should be acquired and kept on stand-by for a

  • guest’s request. These items can include: TDD (Telephone Communication Device for

  • the Deaf), closed captioned television decoders, local and system smoke detectors with

  • visual annunciation, visual/vibrating door knockers, visual/vibrating alarm clocks, and

  • telephone amplifiers.

  • Staff on all shifts should be trained on installation and use of handicapped accessible

  • equipment.

  • PBX should be provided with a TDD for communicating with guests and trained in its

  • use.

  • Local building officials and authorities should be consulted with respect to any

  • government or local legislation that may apply to a disabled person.

Consideration must be made for assisting handicapped individuals when developing and

practicing the hotel’s emergency plan. The local fire authority may be contacted for

assistance in developing a plan appropriate for your hotel.

III. Premises Protection



Fencing...............................................................................................................................2

Landscaping......................................................................................................................2

Lighting ..............................................................................................................................3

Parking Lots.......................................................................................................................5

Parking Garages ................................................................................................................6

Closed Circuit Television ..................................................................................................8

Building Access Control..................................................................................................10

Emergency Exits ..............................................................................................................11

Public Restrooms .............................................................................................................11

Elevator s...........................................................................................................................12

Unauthor ized Per sons .....................................................................................................13

Contractors ......................................................................................................................14

Receiving Door Control ..................................................................................................18

Salvage Sales ....................................................................................................................19

Premises Protection

III-2


Fencing

Fencing of the hotel grounds can often be an effective tool in improving perimeter

protection. The concept of fencing is to create a physical barrier between the hotel and the

surrounding areas. This can act as a deterrent to individuals cutting across the hotel grounds

and to would-be criminals.

The determination for whether or not a property should be fenced should be based on a

variety of factors, including the design and layout of the hotel and its grounds, the

neighborhood and neighboring businesses surrounding the hotel, and the history of criminal

activity in the area. The type of fencing to be used should be determined by the function it

will serve. For example:



  • To help limit unauthorized access, a fence at least six feet in height is recommended.

  • Special attention should be given to the portion of the fencing at ground level to

  • eliminate the possibility that someone could crawl under the fence.

  • If limiting visual access is a concern, a solid decorative fence at least six feet in height

  • can be used. The fence may be made of wood, brick or concrete blocks.

  • To reduce noise levels, a formed concrete or block wall may be used.

To ensure the effectiveness of the fence, it should be inspected for damage on a regular

basis. Shrubbery and trees that reduce the effectiveness of the barrier should be removed or

pruned. Shrubbery can be utilized as an effective "living fence". This may be accomplished

by using plants with thorns. For varying climates, some examples include:



Tropical

  • Bougainvillaea Glabra (evergreen)-most effective and decorative when in bloom.

  • Clereodendron Inerny (false Jasmine)-forms a very dense but non-thorny hedge wall.

  • Cactus (various types)-thorny, used in arid areas but not generally used as a climbing or

  • hedge plant.

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