Jeffers petroglyphs: examining socioeconomic and cultural differences between late archaic and late prehistoric periods introduction



Yüklə 306,02 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/10
tarix07.03.2022
ölçüsü306,02 Kb.
#114783
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10
Rahman Abdullayev - JEFFERS PETROGLYPHS - EXAMINING SOCIOECONOMIC AND CULTURAL
Paper final - Rahman Abdullayev


Rahman Abdullayev 

JEFFERS PETROGLYPHS: EXAMINING SOCIOECONOMIC AND CULTURAL 

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN LATE ARCHAIC AND LATE PREHISTORIC PERIODS 

 

INTRODUCTION 

Located in Cottonwood County in southwestern Minnesota, the Jeffers Petroglyphs Site is a large 

group  of  rock  art  in  the state.  Glaciers  and  the  hot, dry  environment  that  followed the  end  of  glacial 

activity have significantly shaped this region (Callahan 2001). What Jeffers does document is the use of 

the site by groups coming from, or influenced by contact with people from, a wide geographic area. The 

site  provides  a  possible  insight  into  Archaic  economic,  social,  and  spiritual  life  and  demonstrates  a 

worldview not limited to southwestern Minnesota (Buhta et al. 2017:88). The imagery of rock rt has the 

ability to provide insights on the nature and evolution of prehistoric and protohistoric American Indian 

cognition,  subsistence  practices,  technology,  aesthetics,  and  other  cultural  characteristics  that  are 

difficult or impossible to interpret through other means (Dudzik 1995:99). 

The  Jeffers  petroglyphs  are  located  in  the  Praire  Lake  archaeological  region.  The  Praire  Lake 

Region includes the majority of southwestern Minnesota, northeastern South Dakota, and north-central 

Iowa.  The  region  is  characterized  by  a  consistent  distribution  of  tallgrass  prairie  vegetation  and  a 

concentration of shallow, non-alkaline lakes of varied sizes. While natural element patterns define the 

region's borders, archaeological examinations show that major cultural elements appear to be contained 

within the same confines (Anfinson 1997:1). Although archaeological investigations in the  area have 

generated no important finds, excavations in the monument's neighbouring sites (Lothson 1976:4-5) and 

the overall archaeological characterization of the region allow Jeffers Petroglyphs to be evaluated in the 

archaeological context of the Praire Lake Region. 

According to the results of recent archaeological investigations in the area, the region featured a 

more  durable  cultural  tradition  that  was  immune  to  outside  influences  during  the  Middle  Prehistoric 

period (Anfinson 1997:2). Evidence of growing settlement patterns in the region throughout the Middle 

Prehistoric period suggests that at least some parts of the images in the Jeffers Petroglyphs were made 



during this period. However, the goal of this study is not to establish a chronology of rock art but to 

connect the themes of carvings from different archaeological periods with the economic and social life 

of the inhabitants. For this reason, although it was published 45 years ago, the periodic classification of 

Lothson Gordon, which remained the most relevant study in the chronology of Jeffers Petroglyphs, was 

taken as the basis. Since Lothson attributed the petroglyphs mainly to the Archaic and Late Prehistoric 

periods relying on indicative topics (Lothson 1976:29), this study is based on the mentioned periods. 

The  first  information  about  the  existence  of  petroglyphs  in  Red  Rock  Ridge  was  published  in 

1885. In 1889, Theodore H. Lewis documented some of the petroglyphs (Lothson 1976). Researchers 

have  proposed  a  variety  of  uses  for  rock  art,  ranging  from  dream  recall  to  conducting  spiritual  rites 

(Callahan 2001; Lothson 1976). 

Gordon Lothson was the first archaeologist to study and interpret individual petroglyphs in detail. 

He  mapped  out  the  location  and  attempted  to  explain  the  various  motifs.  Lothson  attributed  some 

petroglyphs with hunting magic based on the abundance of game animals, hunting implements such as 

the atlatl and projectile point, and hunting scenes. He associated motifs such as the thunderbird, which 

matched  the  Dakota,  Oto  and  Iowa  people's  religious  symbols  with  sacred  ceremonies.  To  the  third 

group of interpretations, Lothson Gordon referred to scenes depicting people, primarily armed and in 

stylized clothing, and described these scenes as a record of significant events in the lives of people of 

high social status.  

Others,  including  archaeologists,  rock  art  specialists,  and  Native  Elders,  have  researched  the 

carvings  in  recent  decades,  explaining  the  purpose  of  the  petroglyphs  and  the  circumstances  of  their 

production (Sanders 2017; Callahan 2001).  

Callahan Jeffers' interpretation of rock art is based on the spiritual world of several Native peoples 

that inhabited the area at various periods (Callahan 2001). Unlike Callahan, Tom Sanders involved the 

Dakota  Elders  in  the  research  process  and  directly  applied  their  perspective  to  interpret  the  images 

(Sanders 2017). 



While  we  may  never  know  how  early  Indians  began  to  carve  glyphs  at  Jeffers,  an  Archaic 

presence  is  very  likely  (Buhta  et  al.  2017:88).  Lothson  Gordon  established  the  chronology of  Jeffers 

rock  art  by  comparing  subject  matter  with  known  archaeological  evidence.  According  to  the  motif 

groups, there are two main periods in Jeffers rock art: the Late Archaic period (from 3000 BC to 500 

BC), represented mainly by the atlas and projectile point, and the Late Prehistoric period (from 900 AD 

to 1750 AD), dominated by thunderbird and stylized human figures (Lothson 1976: 30-31).  

The  different  motif  patterns  that  constitute  the  two  main  cultural  horizons  represented  in  the 

Jeffers petroglyphs, the Late Archaic and the Late Prehistoric periods, represent its creators' different 

social, economic, and cultural backgrounds. Consequently, various methods and approaches have been 

proposed to link rock art and archaeological culture. 

 


Yüklə 306,02 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©muhaz.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə