Kaua‘i community college



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Chart I


ORGANIZATIONAL CHART





The Community We Serve
Kaua‘i Community College is located in Kaua‘i county, which includes the islands of Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau. Geographically isolated, the islands are the northernmost of the major Hawaiian islands and separated from Honolulu, the capital and main population and business center of the state, by 100 miles of the Pacific Ocean. Passenger travel to any of the other islands is primarily by air. Ni‘ihau is a privately owned island, which is accessible only by barge and helicopter. It is home to the state’s largest concentration of Native Hawaiian first language speakers.
According to the 2000 Census, the county have a population of 58,463, with 26.4 percent 18 years of age and under, and a median age of 38.4. Of persons 25 and over, only 19.4 percent have a bachelor’s degree, compared to a state average of 26.2 percent. There are 16 public schools, 3 public charter schools with a focus on Native Hawaiian language and culture, and 7 private schools. The county also has the highest proportion, 11.1 percent, of persons aged 25 and older who do not have a high school education.

The ethnic makeup of the island is diverse, though changed from the last decade. The major difference, however, seems to be a result of the addition of a “2 or more races” category, which now represents 24 percent of the population. While those listing native Hawaiian as their only ethnic background make up only 8.1 percent of the population, the numbers of residents declaring native Hawaiian and another ethnic background, as well as native Hawaiian only, actually make up 23.1 percent of the Kaua‘i population. State of Hawai‘i - Population - Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000, Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF1) .

As a community college, KCC must pay particular attention to the goals of the community it serves. The recently completed Kaua‘i Economic Development Plan/Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) Report notes the following significant factors:




  • In line with the state, Kaua‘i is experiencing low unemployment and a tight labor market.




  • Kaua‘i’s economy is dominated by retail and other visitor industry related services, including a significant number of small, locally owned businesses.




  • Most jobs do not pay a “living wage,” defined for Kaua‘i as $60,000 for a family of four. Sixty-five percent of Kaua‘i’s jobs pay less than $30,000 per year. The salaries of the 10 most represented occupations on Kaua‘i are below $26,000 per year.




  • While unemployment is low, underemployment is high, and there are “pockets” of unemployment in certain areas.




  • Worker shortages are anticipated in all sectors as a significant number of employees reach retirement age. This factor is beginning to impact the college, as well.




  • As previously noted, there are significant numbers of residents without even a high school education in an economy increasingly requiring solid basic skills along with technical and job-specific competencies.




  • According to the state Department of Education Senior Exit Plan Survey, 2003, only 39 percent of public high school seniors were planning to pursue post-secondary education or training. In addition, the report cites the Hawai‘i Outcomes Institute, Healthy Hawai‘i 2010,which notes that “One out of ten teens on Kaua‘i between the ages of 16 to 19, is not in school and not working.”

In planning for future economic development, the county has identified six target clusters as priority “investments” for Kaua‘i:




  • Food and Agriculture

  • Health and Wellness

  • Sports and Recreation

  • Arts and Culture

  • High Technology

  • Renewable Energy

Workforce training needs in all these areas are taken into consideration in the college’s own strategic planning, curriculum development and resource allocation decisions. Specific projections of workforce needs are also considered in college planning.


Student Enrollment Trends
Enrollment trends over the past 5 years have been unstable, with increases in 2001-2002 and decreases in 2003-2004. This movement has been somewhat counter to trends on other campuses in the system, which have tended upward during that period. However, only Windward and Maui community colleges have returned to or exceeded their enrollment highs of the mid-1990s. While Kaua‘i enrollment was up 6 percent from Fall 2000 to Fall 2004, it was down 26 percent from its high of 1,518 in 1994 to 1,117 in 2004. Chart I: Fall Enrollment 1994-2004 shows headcount enrollment for all seven campuses from Fall 1994 through Fall 2004. Data for Charts I-IV taken from Exhibit 2: MAPS Fall 2004 Enrollment Report.

Some demographic characteristics changed from 2000 through 2004, as well. Mean student age decreased from 28.3 to 27.4, reflecting, in part, an increase in the numbers of high school students below 18 who are taking advantage of the statewide Running Start program, which allows dual credit for selected courses taken at the college. Indeed, despite the mean age of the student body, the largest percentage of students falls into the 18-19 year age group. Students 21 and below make up just over 50 percent of the student population. However, the mature, working adult group, 35-59, is also a significant population.



Fall Enrollment Age Distribution






Fall 2000

Fall 2001

Fall 2002

Fall 2003

Fall 2004

1 Yr

Change





No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

%

Mean Age (in years)

28.3




29.3




28.1



28.2




27.4







Under 18

41

3.9

48

4.1

65

5.3

60

5

84

7.5

40

18-19

279

26.5

280

23.6

328

26.8

330

27.3

291

26.1

-11.8

20-21

147

14

154

13

191

15.6

194

16

184

16.5

-5.2

22-24

126

12

138

11.6

119

9.7

139

11.5

121

10.8

-12.9

25-29

109

10.4

120

10.1

118

9.6

97

8

97

8.7

0

30-34

78

7.4

101

8.5

84

6.9

86

7.1

81

7.3

-5.8

35-59

247

23.5

315

26.6

292

23.9

278

23

240

21.5

-13.7

60 and Over

25

2.4

29

2.4

25

2

26

2.1

19

1.7

-26.9

No Data

2

0.2



























Another potentially significant change can be seen in the slowly growing numbers of students who have off-island addresses, illustrating the growth in distance learning as an important option for students. These numbers represent students who are residing on other islands and taking KCC courses via distance technologies. On the other hand, we are also seeing students who live on Kaua‘i but are pursuing their degrees from another campus, primarily one of the four-year campuses.
Fall Enrollment Local Address




Fall 2000

Fall 2001

Fall 2002

Fall 2003

Fall 2004

LOCAL ADDRESS

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

Kaua‘i

1,052

100

1,171

98.8

1,177

96.2

1,153

95.3

1,073

96

Lihu‘e

286

27.1

336

28.5

307

25.1

309

25.6

285

25.4

Kawaihau

289

27.5

311

26.2

347

28.3

332

27.4

327

29.3

Waimea

162

15.4

157

13.2

172

14.1

160

13.2

152

13.6

Koloa

247

23.5

280

23.6

279

22.8

275

22.7

240

21.5

Hanalei

68

6.5

87

7.3

72

5.9

77

6.4

69

6.2

Other Neighbor Islands

13

1.1

27

2.2

17

1.4

22

2

29.4



No Data

1

0.1

20

1.6

40

3.3

22

2





While headcount enrollment fluctuated over this period, FTE and the number of full-time students was slightly more stable, pointing out that the enrollment behavior of part-time students has been the driver of change. This pattern, together with the high proportion of students who are working both part time and full time, has impacted scheduling and related curricular and service decisions.


Fall Enrollments FTE and Headcount FT and PT


Enrollment Projection
Enrollment projections for high, middle and low growth have been estimated through 2010. The middle series has been used for strategic planning and budget development. The college’s long-term goal is to grow enrollment to a 1350 headcount, in line with the high-growth projection. This figure is still below the highs of the mid-1990s and should be attainable given the resources presently available.

Source – Exhibit 2: Enrollment Projections, UH Community Colleges Fall 2004 to Fall 2010.


The going rate of recent high school graduates is another key indicator that the college tracks. The figure below shows the number of all State of Hawai‘i high school graduates entering Kaua‘i Community College the fall semester following their graduation from high school.

Going Rate High School Graduates (Number)

Source: MAPS, High School Background of First-Time Students, University of Hawai‘i, Fall 2003, Table 4.

As would be expected, if only Kaua‘i schools are considered, the numbers change very little. Kaua‘i High School, in Lihu‘e, is the closest of the three public high schools. Waimea High is on the west side of the island and Kapa‘a on the east/north.


Going rate from Kaua‘i high schools fell from its high of 23.5 percent in Fall 2002 to a low of 18.8 percent in Fall 2003.


 

Fall 1999

Fall 2000

Fall 2001

Fall 2002

Fall 2003

Public

No.

Going Rate

No.

Going Rate

No.

Going Rate

No.

Going Rate

No.

Going Rate

Kaua‘i

157

22.1%

141

20.2%

134

18.8%

165

23.5%

122

18.8%

Kapa‘a

45

18.1%

57

21.2%

28

11.8%

44

18.0%

51

20.6%

Kaua‘i

67

24.2%

49

19.9%

72

25.3%

80

30.5%

40

17.7%

Waimea

45

24.9%

35

19.1%

34

18.2%

41

21.4%

31

18.5%

Private

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kaua‘i

-

 

3

9.7%

4

17.4%

2

9.1%

-

 

Island School 1/

-

 

2

11.1%

1

16.7%

-

 

-

 

Kahili

-

 

1

14.3%

3

75.0%

1

20.0%

-

 

Kula 1/

-

 

-

 

-

 

1

14.3%

-

 


































1/ First graduates reported June 2000























































Note: The "going rate" is the percentage of graduates from a given high school entering Kaua‘i Community College in fall semester immediately following graduation from high school.

Data Source for Going Rate: MAPS Report “High School Background of First-Time Students.”
Data from the Senior Exit Plan Survey, which the state Department of Education administers each year, showed that in 2005, (Exhibit 3: Senior Exit Plan Survey) 31 percent of public high school seniors at Kaua‘i High School and Kapa‘a High School, who completed the survey, indicated an intention to attend KCC. (Waimea High School sent only information on students indicating an intention to attend KCC from their 2005 survey.) However, the actual going rate has been significantly less. Moreover, according to the Kaua‘i CEDS, only 39 percent of Kaua‘i seniors planned to pursue any additional education or training. This figure is of concern, especially since 1 in 10 youth between 16 and 19 are neither attending school nor working.
The college serves a primarily resident population, with approximately 97 percent of the students claiming residency status. A small, but steady non-resident population reflects the increasing proportion of new residents on the island.
Enrollment by Residency for Tuition Status


 

FALL 2000

FALL 2001

FALL 2002

FALL 2003

FALL 2004

1 YR

 

No.

V%

No.

V%

No.

V%

No.

V%

No.

V%

% Change

TUITION STATUS:



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residents

1,020

97

1,147

96.8

1,195

97.6

1,180

97.5

1,078

96.5

-8.6

Resident

1,016

96.6

1,137

95.9

1,186

96.9

1,171

96.8

1,070

95.8

-8.6

Resident Converted

4

0.4

10

0.8

9

0.7

9

0.7

8

0.7

-11.1

Non-Residents

32

3

38

3.2

29

2.4

29

2.4

38

3.4

3.1

Not Exempted

29

2.8

26

2.2

23

1.9

26

2.1

35

3.1

34.6

Exempted

3

0.3

12

1

6

0.5

3

0.2

3

0.3

0

Military

1

0.1

2

0.2

2

0.2

1

0.1

1

0.1

0

Faculty / Staff

8

0.7

1

0.1



 

 

 

 

 

 

Institutional

2

0.2



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ethnic Hawaiian

2

0.2

2

0.2

3

0.2

2

0.2



 

 

No Data

1

0.1

1

0.1



 

 

 

 

 

 

MAPS Fall 2004 Enrollment Report


Student Profile
As noted above, the college student body reflects the diversity of the Kaua‘i community. Although the faculty is also diverse, certain groups are over-represented and others underrepresented in relation to the county population. Also, as noted above, the 2000 census figures for native Hawaiians must be considered in the context of the way in which ethnicity is reported through the University of Hawai‘i data system, as opposed to the census figures. Further mining of the census figures for the numbers reporting “mixed” background, i.e., native Hawaiian and at least one other ancestry, yields a figure of 23.1 percent, rather than the 8.1 percent reporting native Hawaiian only. (Exhibit: Census 2002) As the university reports “Hawaiian and part Hawaiian,” the “mixed” percentage, which is included in the “All Others” below, is more comparable.

State, County, Students, and Faculty Diversity

Sources:


    1. State of Hawai‘i and County of Kaua‘i – Population: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics for the State of Hawai‘i, by Counties: 2000 (in Percentages)i. Percentages include ‘One Race’ only replies; multiple races are included in All Others.

    2. Students: MAPS, Fall Enrollment Report, University of Hawai‘i, Community Colleges, Fall 2004, Table 3ii.

    3. Full-Time Faculty: Community Colleges Human Resource Office.

As the following table shows, the community colleges serve by far the majority of native Hawaiian students in the UH System. In line with our mission of access and the UH System’s commitment to serving the needs of native Hawaiian students, KCC has established a Hawaiian Studies Center on campus and has both federally funded and internally funded outreach and support services which serve the needs of native Hawaiian students.



Hawaiian and Part Hawaiian Enrollment

Source: UH-IRO Ad-Hoc Studies, Special Report: Hawaiian/Part Hawaiian Students Enrolled in the University of Hawai‘i System.

Note: UHCC figure is UHCC System total minus Kaua‘i Community College total.
In terms of the percentage of the total student body, the representation of Native Hawaiian students at Kaua‘i Community College is equal to or better than such representation in the UHCC System as a whole. The number served has grown in the past few years as the result of a focused effort, including a US Department of Education Title III grant, which funded the construction of the Hawaiian Studies Center, expansion of the Hawaiian Studies curriculum and the integration of culturally appropriate values and instructional materials into courses across the curriculum, especially science and math.

Source: UH-IRO Ad-Hoc Studies, Special Report: Hawaiian/Part Hawaiian Students Enrolled in the University of Hawai‘i System.

Note: UHCC percentage does not include Kaua‘i Community College.

*Percentage is number of Hawaiian/Part Hawaiian student enrollment for series divided by the total student enrollment for same series.
The Fall 2004 enrollment is consistent with trends we have seen over the past five years. The three largest ethnic groups are Filipino, Caucasian and Native Hawaiian. Females continue to outnumber males by a considerable percentage, though that difference has narrowed very slightly over the last few years from 37.1 percent male in Fall 2000 to 39 percent male in Fall 2004.

F
all 2004 Kaua‘i CC Student Enrollment - Ethnicity and Gender

Source: MAPS, Fall Enrollment Report, University of Hawai‘i, Community Colleges, Fall 2004, Appendix C4iii.



International Student Enrollment
While non-resident students are not a major factor in the college’s credit enrollment, the international goals of the UH System are reflected in an active non-credit program, primarily with institutional partners in Japan, Okinawa and Hong Kong. In the spring semester, short- term visits (two weeks) have taken place for more than a decade with Chiba Keizai College and Okinawa Christian University. A third agreement with the Okinawa Prefectural College of Nursing is in its fourth year and our first agreement with Hong Kong involves a private culinary school, Kitty Choi’s Cookery and Catering. These visits take place during the summer.
International Student Credit Enrollment Fall 2004

Region of Origin

HAW

HON

KAP

KAU

LEE

MAU

WIN

UHCC

Africa

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

1

Americas

1

3

6

 

2

10

2

24

Asia

32

23

363

4

7

56

2

487

Europe

1

2

9

 

 

5

3

20

Middle East

 

 

1

 

1

 

1

3

Australia

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

1

Oceania

6

7

5

 

5

3

1

27

No Data

 

1

11

 

2

 

2

16

Total

40

37

396

4

17

74

11

579

Source: UH IRO August 2005 (all non resident alien status students).


Employee Profile
Kaua‘i Community College has a staff of 131, including 63 faculty, 62 classified staff, and 6 administrators. Faculty include instructional and non-instructional positions such as counselors, librarians, and academic support professionals.
Administrative/Professional/Technical (APT) staff include support professionals in financial services, facilities management, institutional research, student services, computer services, and media services. Civil service staff is made up of clerical and facilities support staff. Lecturers and part-time casual hire staff are not included in these numbers. The ratio of clerical support to faculty is 1:4.
Females make up 46 percent of the faculty, slightly below the UHCC System average ratio. Executive/managerial employees are evenly split between male and female, as are the professional support staff (APT). Ethnically, the faculty is primarily Caucasian and Japanese, with some representation among Filipino and Native Hawaiian. There has been a slight rise in the hiring of Caucasian faculty. The age of the faculty and staff has remained almost the same except for a marked drop in the 42-48 year old age group for faculty. The largest numbers are in the 49-62 ranges and programs predict a decline in these groups due to retirement.


Faculty Diversity: Ethnicity, Gender, Age.





Staff Diversity: Gender, Age, Ethnicity





Faculty by Rank, Ethnicity, and Gender


Source: UH Community Colleges Human Resources Office.



Student Retention, Persistence, Graduation, And Transfer

The following figures show measures of student success in meeting educational objectives and demonstrating student movement.


Retention refers to those students who are enrolled in a course at the fall census date and who do not drop or withdraw before the end of the semester. Within the University of Hawai‘i Community College System, this has also been called the Course Completion Rate.

Most recent report Fall 2001.

Source: MAPS, Distribution of Grades, Credits Earned Ratios, Course Completion Ratios and Current Grade Point Ratios, University of Hawai‘i, Community Colleges, Table 4Div.



Note: Most recent report Fall 2001.
While data from the UH System Institutional Research Office is not available beyond Fall 2001, campus data on course completions for 2002-2004 is consistent with the system data shown above. These numbers reflect all students, not just full time, first time.


TABLE A.

Retention Rate of Students Still Enrolled at Census Date\1




























LINE




FALL 2002

FALL 2003

FALL 2004







A:

Enrollment

3,374

3,422

3,154







B:

Audits

10

36

8







C (A-B):

Adj. Enrollment

3,364

3,386

3,146







D:

Withdraws

277

225

185







E (C-D):

Retention

3,087

3,161

2,961







F (E/C):

Retention Rate

91.77%

93.35%

94.12%




























TABLE B.

Pass Rate of Courses By Students Still Enrolled at End of Semester (no Withdraws)\2







LINE




FALL 2002

FALL 2003

FALL 2004







E:

Retention

3,087

3,161

2,961







G:

Fails (F,NC), No Grades (N)

371

483

359







H (E-G):

Receive Passing Grade /4

2,716

2,678

2,602







I (H/E):

Pass Rate

87.98%

84.72%

87.88%




























TABLE C.

Pass Rate of Courses By Students Still Enrolled at Census Date\3




























LINE




FALL 2002

FALL 2003

FALL 2004







C:

Adj. Enrollment

3,364

3,386

3,146







J (G+D):

Fails (F,NC), No Grades (N), Withdraws (W)

648

708

544







K (C-J):

Receive Passing Grade

2,716

2,678

2,602







L (K/C):

Pass Rate

80.74%

79.09%

82.71%






































































Notes



















\1 -

All students enrolled in a course as regular students (no audits, "L") at census and who do not withdraw from that course (receive "W" grade).






















\2 -

All students enrolled in a course as regular students (no audits, "L") at the end of the semester ("W" not included) and who receive a passing grade (A, B, C, D, CR).






















\3 -

All students enrolled in a course as regular students (no audits, "L") at census and who receive a passing grade (A, B, C, D, CR).






















/4 -

Passing Rate is distinguished from "Successful Completion," which requires a grade of "C" or better. Most course pre-requisites specify a grade of "C"or better in the pre-requisite course.









Persistence refers to students who enroll in a fall course and also enroll in a course the following spring. Clearly, simple retention in the fall semester does not translate into persistence to the spring semester.

Sources:



    1. MAPS, Fall Enrollment Report, University of Hawai‘i, Community Colleges, Fall 2004, Table 1.

    2. Data for Spring 2000 and Spring 2001: MAPS, Spring Enrollment Report, University of Hawai‘i, Community Colleges, Spring 2000 and Spring 2001, Table 4v.


    Data for Spring 2002 on: MAPS, Spring Enrollment Report, University of Hawai‘i, Spring 2002, Spring 2003, and Spring 2004, Table 7vi.



Certificates and Degrees Awarded
While the majority of the students declare a major in Liberal Arts, or the AA degree, the college primarily awards career and technical degrees and certificates, i.e., AS, CA or CC.

Source: MAPS, Degrees and Certificates Earned, University of Hawai‘i, Community Colleges, Table 1vii.



    Note: Certificate data only includes Certificates of Achievement (CA).






    *Certificates of Completion/Competency (CC and CO) and Academic Subject Certificates (ASC): Operational Data Store (ODS) 6/22/2005 data pull provided by APAPA.


Source: IPEDS Graduation Rate Survey.


Notes:

    6. Numbers are unduplicated.

    7. Graduation – first-time, full-time students who received a degree or certificate within 150 percent of time from first-time enrollment.

    8. Transfer – first-time, full-time students who transfer (as matched by National Student Clearinghouse data) to another postsecondary institution within 150 percent of time from first-time enrollment.

    9. Continuing – first-time, full-time students who are still enrolled at the same institution within 150 percent of time from first-time enrollment and who have not received a degree or certificate.

    10. Transfer-Out information available beginning Fall 2000 cohort.



Transfers to Colleges and Universities
Table 6 looks at the transfer behaviors of students whose last term of attendance was between the semesters of Fall 2001 to Summer 2004 compared against National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) data in July 2005. As some students have attended multiple colleges, the first college that a student attended was selected for this analysis.
Transfer Numbers and Rates



Source: National Student Clearinghouse, Operational Data Store (ODS) 7/19/2005.


Basic Skills Completion
In line with national trends, a significant proportion of the incoming students is academically unprepared for college level work. The college uses the COMPASS placement test from ACT to determine proper placement of incoming students in math, English, and other courses which have a math or English pre-requisite. COMPASS scores for math from 1997-2003, as shown below, demonstrate the level of remediation needed among entering students. Only 4 percent of those taking the test tested into college algebra. Seventy-five percent tested into remedial math or pre-algebra.

The placement score required for placement into English 100, our transfer level English class, is 74-100 in the Writing module. The mean writing score of students from the three public high schools for this same period of time, 1997-2003, ranged from 44.1 to 46.7. This mean score placed most students into our English 22, which generally serves as the expected English course for our non-transfer level career and technical programs. (Exhibit: COMPASS Cutoff Scores, Exhibit: Kaua‘i High Schools’ Compass Scores October 30-1997 to September 22, 2003.)


Basic Skills are defined as math and English courses not applicable to a degree or certificate. These courses are English 18 and 19 and Math 22. Basic Skills Completion is calculated from:


  • Student enrollment in the final basic skills course prior to the regular college curriculum and,

  • Successful completion of the basic skills class, and

  • Successful completion of the following regular college curriculum course.

This is as compared to completers in the first regular college curriculum who enrolled without taking a basic skills prerequisite course. English 22, Writing 21, and Reading and Math 24 are considered college-level courses, but do apply toward our AAS degrees and certificates in our career and technical areas.


As the chart shows, students who tested directly into the college courses were generally more successful than those who first took the basic skills courses. Overall completion rates, regardless of how the student entered the course, are adequate but clearly leave room for improvement.

Source: Banner—Operational Data Store (ODS) Captured 07/14/2005.


Job Placement and Preparation

The college surveys graduates and leavers annually. For career and technical program graduates, employment status is one of the questions asked each year. As the chart below shows, the employment status of graduates has been steadily improving. In particular, the percentage of graduates with full-time employment shows significant improvement.


The greatest change in all categories except “Employed Full-Time” was shown in 2001-2002. In 2001-2002, unemployment decreased to about 12.5 percent, considerably below the 25 percent unemployment in 2001-2002 and a little lower than the 14 percent in 2000-2001. While “Unemployed by Choice” had small responses in 2000-2001 and in 2001-2002, there were no responses in 2002-2003. Part-time employment plunged 15 percent in 2001-2002 and then rose about 6 percent in 2002-2003. Full-time employment was the only indicator which showed an increase in each year. It moved from 32 percent to 35 percent in 2001-2002 and from 35 percent to 44 percent in 2002-2003.

Source: UH Community Colleges campus Graduate and Leavers Surveys.




Source: UH Community Colleges campus Graduate and Leavers Surveys.


The college’s Graduate and Leaver Surveys indicate high satisfaction among students with their preparation for entering the workforce. Over 90 percent of liberal arts and career/technical education graduates in 2002-2003 felt they were moderately to well prepared for the workplace by their programs. Only 3 percent felt they were poorly prepared.

Students indicating they were “well-prepared” rated their preparation nearly the same in 2000-2001 and 2002-2003. Those graduating in 2001-2002 rated their preparation 13 percent to 16 percent higher. Those viewing themselves as “moderately well-prepared” for their programs also rated their preparation nearly the same in 2000-2001 and 2002-2003, but in 2001-2003 fewer graduates felt they were moderately prepared, rating their preparation 11 percent-12 percent lower than in the other 2 years. Those who felt they were adequately prepared to enter the workforce rated preparation with higher percentages each year. In 2000-2001, zero students rated their preparation as simply adequate; in 2001-2002, 1 percent felt their preparation was adequate; in 2002-2003, 4 percent saw their preparation as adequate. Students who felt they were poorly prepared for entering the workforce showed nearly the same percentages as those who felt adequately prepared, the percentages differing by years—0 percent in 2001-2002, 1 percent in 2000-2001, and 3 percent in 2002-2003.


Student Engagement
Research shows that the more actively engaged students are with college faculty and staff with other students, and with the subject matter they study, the more likely they are to learn and persist toward achieving their academic goals. Student engagement, therefore, is a valuable yardstick for assessing whether, and to what extent, an institution is employing educational practices likely to produce successful results.
University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges have been recognized in the national Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) among the highest performing colleges. Kaua‘i Community College’s performance on the 2004 survey reached national benchmarks in all areas.
Figure 16
CCSSE Benchmark Scores

Source: CCSSE 2004, Kaua‘i Community Collegeviii.


The comparison below, between the 2002 survey results and the 2004 results, demonstrates significant improvement in student perceptions. The smallest improvement in perception was the 10 percent change in student views toward Active and Collaborative Learning, moving from 80 percent to 90 percent. Two areas showed 30 percent improvement: Student Effort and Support for Learners both improved from 50 percent to 80 percent. In the area of Academic Challenge, student perception moved from 40 percent to 80 percent. The greatest change in perception, 60 percent, was in the area of Student-Faculty interaction.

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  1. http://www.hawaii.gov/dbedt/info/census/Folder.2005-10-13.2927/profile-kauai/kauaicdp.pdf , Race, One race percentages for State of Hawai‘i and Kaua‘i.

  2. http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?seccf04.pdf, Table 3: Selected Characteristics of Credit Students, University of Hawai‘i, Community Colleges, Ethnicity, Kaua‘i.

  3. http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?seccf04.pdf, Appendix C4: Distribution of Majors, by Program, Gender and Ethnicity, Kaua‘i Community College, Grand Total group.

  4. http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?grccf01.pdf, Table 4D: Course Completion Ratios, Kaua‘i Community College.

  5. http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?seccs00.pdf, Table 4: Selected Characteristics of Credit Students, Kaua‘i, Registration status=Continuing;
    http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?seccs01.pdf, Table 4, as above.

  6. http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?seuhs02.pdf, Table 7: Selected Characteristics of Credit Students, Kaua‘i, Registration status=Continuing;
    http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?seuhs03.pdf, Table 7, as above;
    http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?seuhs04.pdf, Table 7, as above.

  7. http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?dgccy04.pdf, Table 1: Degrees and Certificates Earned, Kaua‘i Community College, Certificates of Achievement and Associate Degrees.

  8. http://www.ccsse.org/survey/public-profile.cfm?ipeds=141802&source=2004. Note: Public results do not include national mean on chart. Username and password are required to enter the members only results for Kaua‘i Community College at http://www.ccsse.org/members/profiles/profile.cfm?ipeds=141802&source=2004.

Abstract of the Report


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