Memorandum



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Data on the Generation and Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Other wastes in 2003 (as reported)

Quantities

(in metric tons)

Generation


Amount of hazardous wastes generated under Art. 1(1)a (Annex I: Y1-Y45) of BC

1)

Amount of hazardous wastes generated under Art. 1(1)b of BC

1)

Total amount of hazardous wastes generated


1)

Amount of other wastes generated (Annex II: Y46-Y47)

2)

Export


Amount of hazardous wastes exported

1,176,204

Amount of other wastes exported

1,439,346

Import


Amount of hazardous wastes imported

141,557

Amount of other wastes imported

207,276

1) Clarification is pending concerning the 'total amount of hazardous wastes generated - Art. 1 (1)a (Annex I: Y1-Y45)' provided as ''1,842,229 metric tons' as well as 'total amount of hazardous wastes generated - Art. 1 (1)b' provided as '298,174 metric tons'.

2) Clarification is pending concerning the 'total amount of other wastes generated (Annex II: Y46-Y47)' provided as '4,927,120' metric tons.
Basel Convention 2002
Country Fact Sheet 2003


New Zealand



Status of Ratifications:




Party to the Basel Convention:

20.12.1994

Amendment to the Basel Convention:

-

Basel protocol on Liability and Compensation:
-

(Accession (a); Acceptance (A); Approval (AA); Formal confirmation (c); Ratification; Succession (d))




Competent Authority






Focal Point

Resources and Networks Branch

Environmental Issues Group

Ministry of Economic Development

P.O. Box 1473

Wellington

New Zealand

Telephone: (64 4) 474 28 76

Telefax: (64 4) 473 70 10

E-Mail: robyn.washbourne@med.govt.nz

website: http://www.med.govt.nz


Basel Convention Focal

Ministry for the Environment

P.O. Box 10362

Wellington

New Zealand

Telephone: (64 4) 917 74 00

Telefax: (64 4) 917 75 23

E-Mail: basel@mfe.govt.nz

website: http://www.mfe.govt.nz





National Definition

National definition of waste used for the purpose of transboundary movements of waste exists in New Zealand.

Attachment A provides “Prohibited Waste Exports” under the customs Export Prohibition Order 2002.

There is no national definition of hazardous waste used for the purpose of transboundary movements of waste in New Zealand.
There is no information concerning hazardous wastes as defined by national legislation in accordance with Art. 1, para 1(b) of the Basel Convention provided for New Zealand.
In New Zealand there are no wastes other than those pursuant to Art. 1 (1)a and/or Art. 1 (1)b of the Basel Convention that require special consideration when subjected to transboundary movement.




Restrictions on Transboundary Movement

Amendment to the Basel Convention

The amendment to the Basel Convention (Decision III/1) has not been implemented in New Zealand.







Restrictions on export for final disposal

New Zealand restricts the export of hazardous wastes and other wastes for final disposal.


Customs Export Prohibition Order 2002 (replacing the 1994, 1996 and 1999 Orders).
As per Basel Convention/OECD requirements.





Restrictions on export for recovery

New Zealand restricts the export of hazardous wastes and other wastes for recovery.


Customs Export Prohibition Order 2002 (replacing the 1994, 1996 and 1999 Orders).

As per Basel Convention/OECD requirements.


The Waigani Convention came into force on 21 October 2001, which allows New Zealand to consent to imports of hazardous wastes from Parties to the Waigani Convention.





Restrictions on import for final disposal and for recovery

New Zealand restricts the import of hazardous wastes and other wastes for final disposal and for recovery.


Import Control (Wastes) Conditional Prohibition Order 1994.
As per Basel Convention/OECD requirements.
The Waigani Convention came into force on 21 October 2001, which allows New Zealand to consent to imports of hazardous wastes from Parties to the Waigani Convention.





Restrictions on transit

New Zealand restricts the transit of hazardous wastes and other wastes.


As applied through relevant import and export regulations.

Transit consents required.






Reduction and/or Elimination of Hazardous Waste Generation


National strategies/policies

The New Zealand Waste Strategy has been developed to look for ways to minimise New Zealand’s waste and improve its management. The Strategy includes four main work programmes:


Institutions and legislation - ensuring we have a sound legal framework for waste minimisation and management, with clear roles for central, regional and local government; ensuring good planning, and compliance with international conventions.
Waste reduction and materials efficiency - developing tools and techniques to reduce waste and maximise re-use, recycling and recovery; removing obstacles to the use of recovered materials, and developing economic incentives to change wasteful behavior.

Information and communication - collecting the right information on waste minimisation and management; enhancing community understanding of waste issues, and encouraging individual efforts to reduce waste.

Standards and guidelines - setting consistently high environmental performance standards for waste treatment and disposal, transport and storage; having all waste facilities account for the full cost of their operation and charge accordingly.
The strategy sets national targets for dealing with various waste streams. Some key targets relate to:

Re-using and recycling high-volume wastes (eg, garden wastes, sewage sludge, and building and demolition wastes);

Minimising and managing hazardous wastes (eg, organochlorines, contaminated sites, and hazardous components in business waste);

Upgrading waste disposal facilities (eg, closing or upgrading substandard landfills and wastewater treatment plants); and

Charging waste generators the true environmental cost of treatment and disposal (eg, charging full cost at landfills).





Legislation, regulations and guidelines

Resource Management Act 1991;

Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996; and

Guidelines for the Management of Hazardous Waste (under development by the Ministry for the Environment).







Economic instruments/ initiatives

Encouragement for appropriate disposal pricing initiatives.







Measures taken by industries/waste generators

Sector based cleaner production initiatives.






Transboundary Movement Reduction Measures

National strategies/policies

The New Zealand Waste Strategy has been developed to look for ways to minimise New Zealand’s waste and improve its management. The Strategy includes four main work programmes:


Institutions and legislation - ensuring we have a sound legal framework for waste minimisation and management, with clear roles for central, regional and local government; ensuring good planning, and compliance with international conventions.
Waste reduction and materials efficiency - developing tools and techniques to reduce waste and maximise re-use, recycling and recovery; removing obstacles to the use of recovered materials, and developing economic incentives to change wasteful behavior.

Information and communication - collecting the right information on waste minimisation and management; enhancing community understanding of waste issues, and encouraging individual efforts to reduce waste.

Standards and guidelines - setting consistently high environmental performance standards for waste treatment and disposal, transport and storage; having all waste facilities account for the full cost of their operation and charge accordingly.
The strategy sets national targets for dealing with various waste streams. Some key targets relate to:

Re-using and recycling high-volume wastes (eg, garden wastes, sewage sludge, and building and demolition wastes);

Minimising and managing hazardous wastes (eg, organochlorines, contaminated sites, and hazardous components in business waste);

Upgrading waste disposal facilities (eg, closing or upgrading substandard landfills and wastewater treatment plants); and

Charging waste generators the true environmental cost of treatment and disposal (eg, charging full cost at landfills).





Legislation, regulations and guidelines

Guidelines for the management of hazardous waste are being developed, initially focusing on record keeping and tracking of hazardous waste. There are existing guidelines for best practice treatment and disposal of hazardous waste that are to be reviewed.






Disposal/

Recovery Facilities

Disposal facilities

  • Waste Resources Ltd., Auckland; Gas fired incineration of pharmaceutical, medical, solvent, plastic wastes etc.; D10

  • United Environmental Ltd., Auckland; Limited land based treatment facilities; D9

  • Waste Management NZ Ltd.; Landfilling of limited types of materials (e.g. asbestos); D5







Recovery/recycling/re-use facilities

  • Exide NZ Ltd., Petone, Wellington; Lead acid battery recovery; R4

  • Milburn Cement Ltd., Westport; Used lubricating oil recovery; R1

  • WPC Ltd., Pukekohe; Used lubricating oil recovery; R1

  • BP/Castrol, Wellington; Used lubricating oil recovery; R9




Bilateral, Multilateral or Regional Agreements

  • Multilateral agreement; OECD Decision C(92)39/FINAL on the Control of Transfrontier Movements of Wastes Destined for Recovery Operations (30 March 1992) OECD Member Countries; 30.03.1992 -

  • Regional agreement; Convention to Ban the Importation into Forum Island Countries of Hazardous and Radioactive Wastes and to Control the Transboundary Movement and Management of Hazardous Wastes within the South Pacific Region (Waigani Convention); Forum Island Countries; 21.10.2001 -



Technical Assistance and Training Available

  • Director, Centre for Sustainable Management, Dept. of Civil and Resource Engineering, University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland.





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