Ucc/ugc/eccc proposal for New Course Please attach proposed Syllabus in approved university format



Yüklə 111,37 Kb.
tarix12.09.2018
ölçüsü111,37 Kb.
#81601


nau_2l

UCC/UGC/ECCC

Proposal for New Course



Please attach proposed Syllabus in approved university format.

1. Course subject and number:



CCJ 313: Rap, Crime and Justice

2. Units:


3


See upper and lower division undergraduate course definitions.

3. College:


SBS


4. Academic Unit:

Criminology and Criminal Justice

5. Student Learning Outcomes of the new course. (Resources & Examples for Developing Course Learning Outcomes)


At the end of this course students will be able to…
Use the racial/ethnic and economic roots of hip/hop culture and rap music as the context for critically examining issues of crime and justice through class discussions and reflective journal assignments.
Analyze the notion of “keepin’ it real” (the struggle for authenticity) inherent in this music and how it relates to the real life experiences of crime, violence, gangs and the drug trade by decoding and reflecting upon the specific content of songs, their relationship to the lives of the artists performing them, and what they say about the realities of crime and justice.
Critically assess the role of social power and the criminal code of the streets in creating and limiting social identities (such as those based on gender, race, and social class). This will be done through song analysis and critical thinking reflections based on their readings as well as their midterm and final project assessments.
Identify and critically analyze the connections between law enforcement responses to crime and criminality and elements of hip hop culture by exploring the legal risks associated with rap music and criminality. This will happen through the written analysis of legal cases and police response.

6. Justification for new course, including how the course contributes to degree program outcomes, or other university requirements / student learning outcomes. (Resources, Examples & Tools for Developing Effective Program Student Learning Outcomes).


The CCJ Department seeks, as one of its main program goals, “to educate students on how social forces influence lawmaking, approaches to criminal justice, perceptions and experiences of justice; and how, in turn, criminal justice trends influence society”. In the last 20 years, rap music has become a critical expression of the social forces that impact criminal justice (drugs, poverty, gangs, violence, racism) and has, in turn, also become the vehicle for the ongoing critique of criminal justice trends (police use of force, mass incarceration, drug policies). The links between this music, its creators, crime, and social justice have, in essence, made it the soundtrack for issues of crime and justice today.
This course explores these links in a criminal justice context. As the learning objectives explain, the course examines how rap music exposes the lived realities of victims and criminals and how it is the vehicle by which popular misconceptions of criminal justice are exposed and challenged. It exposes rap as the social expression of criminology theories (i.e. differential social organization) and teaches students to see criminological theory in action while also forcing them to respond to its challenges through self-reflection and social action. Finally, it enables students to confront the power structures that have shaped the lived realities of crime and justice found in this music and to understand the role it still plays in shaping the culture of criminality into which they must venture as professionals.
A course focused on rap music, crime and justice is therefore essential for our students, as many of them will become CJ professionals, working with individuals raised on this music not as entertainment but as the mechanism for the transference of the code of the streets, the rule book for how to live in dangerous, crime ridden neighborhoods. Without the opportunity to unpack its messages and understand its role in shaping/reflecting social culture generally and criminal justice specifically, our students are less prepared to meet the professional challenges ahead and the Department less able to meet its overall program goals.


7. Effective BEGINNING of what term and year?



Spring, 2016




See effective dates calendar.










8.  Long course title:

RAP, CRIME AND JUSTICE

(max 100 characters including spaces)




9. Short course title:

RAP, CRIME AND JUSTICE

(max. 30 characters including spaces)

10. Catalog course description (max. 60 words, excluding requisites):



Rap reflects the realities of crime/ justice while encouraging resistance to criminal justice abuses of power. This course critically examines rap music (origin, artist, content, impact), hip hop’s cultural movement, gangsta rap’s challenge to this pro-social movement, connections between rap and gangs, drugs, crime and violence as well as advocacy against these elements, and analyzes rap’s critiques of CJ policies and power structures. (suggested pre-req ES 270: The Genius of Hip Hop)
11. Will this course be part of any plan (major, minor or certificate) or sub plan (emphasis)?

                                                                                                                                 Yes  No 

If yes, include the appropriate plan proposal.

(Upper division CJ elective)
12. Does this course duplicate content of existing courses? Yes  No 

If yes, list the courses with duplicate material. If the duplication is greater than 20%, explain why NAU should establish this course.

13. Will this course impact any other academic unit’s enrollment or plan(s)?          Yes  No 

      If yes, describe the impact. If applicable, include evidence of notification to and/or response from

each impacted academic unit

It may actually increase the enrollment of Ethnic Studies courses on hip hop. CCJ’s course is a junior level course with a large enrollment (75 students) and a specific emphasis on rap and crime. Ethnic Studies currently offers two courses, one at the sophomore and one at the senior/graduate level which focus on hip hop more broadly (graffiti, break dancing, DJing, etc.) through the ethnic studies lens as opposed to the crime and justice lens. As a result of the popularity of the CCJ course currently, CCJ students have been also taking the Ethnic Studies courses in order to broaden and perhaps even deepen their knowledge in this area. As Ethnic Studies is a small department, it is our hope that our course falls into a natural progression for student interested in hip hop and may actually increase Ethnic Studies enrollment. See attached support memo from Ethnic Studies.
14. Grading option:      Letter grade                     Pass/Fail                     Both 


15. Co-convened with:

n/a

14a. UGC approval date*:




(For example: ESE 450 and ESE 550) See co-convening policy.

    *Must be approved by UGC before UCC submission, and both course syllabi must be presented.





16. Cross-listed with:

n/a




(For example: ES 450 and DIS 450) See cross listing policy.

      Please submit a single cross-listed syllabus that will be used for all cross-listed courses.




17. May course be repeated for additional units?




Yes     No 

16a. If yes, maximum units allowed?







16b. If yes, may course be repeated for additional units in the same term?




Yes     No 

18. Prerequisites:

n/a




If prerequisites, include the rationale for the prerequisites.

We are listing ES 270: The Genius of Hip Hop as a suggested pre-req.

19. Co requisites:



n/a




If co requisites, include the rationale for the co requisites.

20. Does this course include combined lecture and lab components?                 Yes  No 

If yes, include the units specific to each component in the course description above.

21. Names of the current faculty qualified to teach this course:



Dr. Rebecca Maniglia, Associate Professor (Jaimee Limmer, CCJ Instructor has also expressed an interest)

22. Classes scheduled before the regular term begins and/or after the regular term ends may require

additional action.  Review “see description” and “see impacts” for “Classes Starting/Ending

Outside Regular Term” under the heading “Forms”

http://nau.edu/Registrar/Faculty-Resources/Schedule-of-Classes-Maintenance/.

 

Do you anticipate this course will be scheduled outside the regular term?   Yes  No   


Answer 22-23 for UCC/ECCC only:
23. Is this course being proposed for Liberal Studies designation?             Yes  No   

       If yes, include a Liberal Studies proposal and syllabus with this proposal.


24. Is this course being proposed for Diversity designation?                                    Yes    No 

       If yes, include a Diversity proposal and syllabus with this proposal.





FLAGSTAFF MOUNTAIN CAMPUS






Scott Galland



3/30/2015

Reviewed by Curriculum Process Associate

Date







Approvals:











Department Chair/Unit Head (if appropriate)

Date



4/20/2015



Chair of college curriculum committee

Date



4/20/2015



Dean of college

Date






For Committee use only:











UCC/UGC Approval

Date

Approved as submitted: Yes  No 

Approved as modified: Yes  No 


EXTENDED CAMPUSES












Reviewed by Curriculum Process Associate

Date







Approvals:






Academic Unit Head

Date



Division Curriculum Committee (Yuma, Yavapai, or Personalized Learning)

Date



Division Administrator in Extended Campuses (Yuma, Yavapai, or Personalized Learning)

Date



Faculty Chair of Extended Campuses Curriculum Committee (Yuma, Yavapai, or Personalized Learning)

Date



Chief Academic Officer; Extended Campuses (or Designee)

Date






Approved as submitted: Yes  No 

Approved as modified: Yes  No 

From: William H Huffman
Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2015 9:04 AM
To: Stuart S Galland
Subject: RE: Approval/Signature Request: CCJ 313 , CCJ 496
here you go..... signed, sealed and delivered!

 

William Huffman, Ph.D.



Associate Dean

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

928-523-9508

Fax: 928-523-7185


From: Angelina Elizabeth Castagno
Sent: Wednesday, March 11, 2015 12:31 PM
To: Rebecca Lynn Maniglia
Cc: Phoebe Ann Morgan; Marianne October Nielsen
Subject: update on CCJ course

Hi Rebecca and all,


The Ethnic Studies Program appreciates that  CCJ will offer this course at the 300-level and note ES 270 as a suggested pre-requisite.  We also appreciate the newer syllabus and the clearer focus on the unique CCJ perspective that your course offers. We believe this course will offer students a nice progression of ideas and learning from ES 270 to your course to ES 470.  We support the development of this course, and hope that CCJ will considering focusing this course on being offered during Fall semesters, with ES focusing our offerings during Spring semesters.
-Angelina
Angelina E. Castagno, PhD

Director, Ethnic Studies Program

Associate Professor, Educational Leadership & Foundations

Northern Arizona University


P.O. Box 15320

SBS West 100D

Flagstaff, AZ 86011-5320

(928) 523-3057



Educated in Whiteness: Good intentions and diversity in schools 

http://upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/educated-in-whiteness


CCJ 313 RAP, CRIME AND JUSTICE

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIOR SCIENCES

DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:35-10:50

SAMPLE SYLLABUS
Dr. Rebecca Maniglia Office Hours: SBS 335, 12:30-2:00 T/R

Phone:928-523-6652 Email: Rebecca.Maniglia@nau.edu



COURSE PRE-REQUISITES
While this course is taught specifically from a criminal justice framework, it has no pre-requisites and is open to all students.
COURSE OVERVIEW

Since its inception, rap music has been used by minorities to tell the unspoken stories of crime and justice—crime, drugs, gangs, and poverty (as related to racism, resiliency, hopeless and survival).  While sometimes viewed as just entertainment, rap music is, for many, the mechanism by which the criminal code of the streets (the rulebook) is passed from one generation to the next while also being the primary mechanism for encouraging resistance to criminal justice system abuses. Thus for any student seeking to understand crime and justice, an understanding and respect of the music and its role in criminality and street culture is essential.

This is a criminal justice course and as such you will be asked to critically examine and interact with the music and its creators but in the specific context of issues related to criminal justice, police, prisons, gangs and violence. We will briefly examine the history of hip hop as a cultural movement, focusing then on the emergence of gangsta rap as a challenge to the pro-social origins of hip hop and the expression of crime and resistance from the streets. We will then explore the intimate connections rap music has to gangs, drugs, crime and violence as well as its efforts to advocate against these elements. We will also critically assess the critiques rap (and the “keepin’ it real” movement) makes to current criminal justice and law enforcement policies and the power structures behind them.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this course students will be able to…


Use the racial/ethnic and economic roots of hip/hop culture and rap music as the context for critically examining issues of crime and justice through class discussions and reflective journal assignments.
Analyze the notion of “keepin’ it real” (the struggle for authenticity) inherent in this music and how it relates to the real life experiences of crime, violence, gangs and the drug trade by decoding and reflecting upon the specific content of songs, their relationship to the lives of the artists performing them, and what they say about the realities of crime and justice.
Critically assess the role of social power and the criminal code of the streets in creating and limiting social identities (such as those based on gender, race, and social class). This will be done through song analysis and critical thinking reflections based on their readings as well as their midterm and final project assessments.
Identify and critically analyze the connections between law enforcement responses to crime and criminality and elements of hip hop culture by exploring the legal risks associated with rap music and criminality. This will happen through the written analysis of legal cases and police response.
COURSE STRUCTURE/APPROACH

This course employs student centered learning techniques. While material will be presented in the classroom setting, every class will involve group work, small group analysis, or class discussion. This work will be based on out of class readings, analysis of songs, artist bios, online discussions and journal reflections. To succeed you will need to come to class every day, prepared and ready to engage in critical thinking and reflection.


STUDENT LEARNING ASSESSMENT TOOLS

In Class Assignments (10 points each…200 points total). These will include our corporate effort to create our own Hip Hop Book modeled after the one created by the New York Police Department; our practicing of decoding skills (understanding the language of criminality in lyrics) by creating a hip hop timeline using the rap song, Season of Hip Hop as our starting place; our group analysis of individual songs in light of a hip hop theory of justice; and daily reading checks (quizzes) to help you keep up and understand the main content of your reading assignments. For many of these you must be present in class on the day the assignment is made to receive credit for the assignment.
Online Journals, Song Responses, Essays (10-30 points each…300 points total) For most classes, you will be asked to continue to process our class discussions and your assigned readings through online discussion questions and journal reflections. You will also be asked to listen to and unpack the theme in specific pieces of music both as preparation for class (no points assigned) and as a follow-up to class materials (for points). Every two weeks or so you will be asked to complete a 3-4 page short essay tying together a number of themes from the previous classes and providing a critical analysis of their connection to the larger themes of crime and justice.
Rap as Reflective of Specific Crime and Justice Issues: Midterm and Final Assessments (100/100 points…200 point total) For these assessments you may choose to research and critically analyze one of the following themes: Rap, Crime and the Construction of Urban Poverty; Rap and Gang Culture; Rap and Policing; Rap and the War on Drugs, or Rap, Crime and the Construction of Individual Identities (gender, race, class).
For your midterm assessment, you will be working with a partner to complete a poster project building on our discussions and readings in class on how rap reflects crime, issues of justice and the criminal justice system. This project will be due right before spring break and will result in a presentation in class (as a roundtable). (For extra credit you can agree to present your poster at the Undergrad Symposium.) The emphasis will be on critical thinking and organization of materials.
For your final assessment, your posters will be returned to you and you will use the feedback you receive to complete a 10 page critical thinking paper on your own on the same subject. This will be due near the end of the course in lieu of a final exam.
Attendance (25 points) Much of the work of this course will take place in class through discussions and class activities. Therefore it is essential that you be present in class. As incentive, I will be taking daily attendance. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO REGISTER YOUR ATTENDANCE FOR EACH CLASS PERIOD. You may not register attendance for a missing student. Getting caught signing for another student will result in both of you losing all of your attendance points for the semester.
You will be permitted two unexcused absences during the semester. Use them as you wish. You will lose five points for every absence documented beyond these two. If you want your absence to be excused, it is necessary to obtain prior approval and to provide documentation. Students with full attendance (no more than 2 unexcused absences) will received the full 25 points.
Turning in Assignments…All assignments, whether in class or online, are due at the beginning of the class period. Any assignments not completed by this time will not be accepted for credit. If you have arranged an excused absence for a date on which an assignment is due, you must turn in that assignment BEFORE your absence. No assignments will be accepted by email so if you miss a class unexpectedly, it is still your responsibility to turn in the work that same day if you want credit for it.
GRADING SCALE

The final grading scale (reflected in the assignments above) is:


725-653 (100%-90%) A

652-580 (89%-80%) B

579-508 (79%-70%) C

507-435 (69%-60%) D

434 and below (59% and below) F
In order to protect the integrity of the grading scale I will not negotiate individual grades after the final grade has been tallied, even if they are within one point of a higher grade.

REQUIRED BOOKS AND READINGS

All required readings are listed on the syllabus under the day they are due. They will all be available online through the bblearn platform. This is an academic course and the reading we do together is as essential as the music we listen to together. Some of it you may find difficult and some will be more mainstream. Either way it is an essential part of the course and there will often be reading checks (quizzes) to help give you incentive to come prepared.


PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVE

I believe the classroom environment is best used as a forum for the exchange of ideas between professor and students. This means that the success of this course will ultimately depend upon our collective energy and enthusiasm. While many classes will include the presentation of material, I am hopeful that many will also include lively discussions, allowing each of you the opportunity to express opinions, explore new ideas and work out personal viewpoints. After all, being able to think critically about multiple subjects is one of the greatest gifts of a college education.
The material covered in this course is personal to us as individuals, and our beliefs and our feelings about these topics shape our daily life experiences in many ways. Some of you come from the very neighborhood that produced this music and have lived lives that have been touched by crime, victimization, poverty and resilience. I encourage you to share those experiences in class as you feel comfortable. In some ways this class flips the traditional power structure of education by valuing “hood” knowledge as valuable and provocative information that sets the stage for our critical analysis of criminality and criminal justice.
In order to create a safe environment for this kind of dialogue, I will insist that each of you exercise a welcoming and sensitive approach to the many perspectives presented and expressed by your fellow students. I encourage you to approach me with any concerns so that we can work together to create an atmosphere of safety and respect.
Rap music is by its very nature controversial. I understand that many of the songs we listen to may have language or ideas that may offend personal, cultural and religious sensitivities. This is true, however, of the realities of crime and justice that this music reflects. It is my desire that the classroom become a place where we can work through those complex issues together in an atmosphere of respect. The music we listen to and the choice and organization of topics also reflects my biases and point of view. This is in some ways inevitable, but please know that in your written assignments and during class discussions, you will not be graded on the content of your positions, but on the quality of their presentation and the manner in which it adequately reflects the content of the course.
CLASS POLICIES

As a class we will develop together community standards which will govern the basic “living” arrangements of the course (cell phones, coming and going, respecting one another, etc.) We will develop these the first day of class and all students will have the opportunity to participate and ultimately agree to be governed by them for the remainder of the semester.


Plagiarism/Academic Dishonesty: The Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice is committed to academic integrity. Academic dishonesty in any form is considered a serious act of misconduct.
The Student Handbook defines plagiarism as "any attempt to pass off other's work as your own" (see http://home.nau.edu/images/userimages/awf/9476/ACADEMICDISHONESTY.pdf). Please cite all sources and give credit to those from whom you borrow ideas, statements and approaches. You must cite the original author if the idea, concept or approach is not original to you. This includes not only when you use the same words as the source but also when you paraphrase from that source. If direct words are used in your work, you must place quotation marks around those words to indicate that you have taken them from another text and provide a citation. Cutting and pasting from websites is considered plagiarism.
Please review the Student Code of Conduct and the University’s Safe Working and Learning Environment Policy for an explanation of appropriate and expected behavior. Any violations of these or other relevant NAU policies may result in such penalties as receiving as written or oral warning and an alternative assignment, receiving zero points for an assignment, receiving a zero for the course, or other consequences.
TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE

JANUARY 13: COURSE INTRODUCTION/LAYING THE GROUNDWORK



We will explore the syllabus, establish community standards for the course, and explore both our own experiences with and assumptions about crime and rap.

JANUARY 15: LEARNING TO LISTEN: THE GEOGRAPHY OF CRIME AND RAP



We will begin to learn to listen by exploring the geography of rap and how location affects both the sound and the message of the music, especially its relationship to drugs, gangs and crime. We will also explore the international influence of both hip hop culture and rap music and how the criminal rule book has been internationalized. Please read “A Hip Hop Theory of Justice” by Paul Butler from Let’s Get Free so that we can explore the hip hop theory of justice and how it helps to create the criminal rule book for the music and the streets. You will have your first discussion questions assigned after class. Remember they are due by the beginning of the next class.

JANUARY 20: THE ART OF RAP: LYRICS AND THE CRIMINAL RULE BOOK



Through portions of the film The Art of Rap: Making Something out of Nothin’ we will explore how artists create rap lyrics and beats and how both provide a criminal rule book of for life on the streets. For class please have read “Hip Hop’s Mama: Originality and Identity in the Music” from Prophets of the Hood: Politics and Poetics in Hip Hop, 2006 so that we can have spirited discussion of the role of race in crime and in rap music. You will have discussion questions after class to continue this discussion.

JANUARY 22: LATINO RAP AND THE ROLE OF CRIME IN RACIAL POLITICS



Building on the class discussion from the 22nd, we will discuss the origins of Latino rap, discussing the connections of cartels and Latino gangs to Latino underground rap. For class please have read “Hip Hop Chicano: A Separate but Parallel Story” by Reagan Kelly from That’s the Joint. You will be assigned Letter to Dr. Dre by King Lil G as the basis for an online song reflection (it will be posted online).

JANUARY 26: LEARNING WHY WE SHOULD LISTEN : CRIMINALITY & CODE OF THE STREETS



For class read excerpt from Code of The Streets by Isaiah Washington. In this class we will revisit the criminological theory differential association theory and how rap music represents an emerging and historical code of criminality for the street. This is about discovering the value and truth of the hood. You will be assigned Music to Me by Mr. Criminal for reflection afterwards.

JANUARY 28: THE “BATTLE” AND THE CRIMINAL CODE OF THE STREETS



Through excerpts from the MC Documentary and your readings we will explore the battle as representative of street culture inherent in rap music. For class please read “Cover Your Eyes as I Describe a Scene So Violent: Violence, Machismo, Sexism and Homophobia” by Michael Eric Dyson from Know What I Mean? You will have discussion questions after class.

FEBRUARY 3: NEW YORK AND THE BIRTH OF HIP HOP/RAP



Through excerpts from the MC Documentary and your reading we will explore the historical roots of rap music as it connects to other aspects of hip hop culture (break dancing, graphic art, beat boxing, etc.) as founded in New York. For class please read “Hip Hop’s Founding Fathers Speak the Truth” by Nelson George from That’s the Joint.

FEBRUARY 5: RAP AND POVERTY: MAD LOVE IN THE HOOD



Rap music has its roots in the expression of the poverty of the inner city. We will explore the role of class in rap music by exploring together the true nature of the inner city ghetto (the “hood”) and how it has been constructed and critically analyzed in the music. You will be assigned Black Boy Fly by Kendrick Lamar as your song response after class and will listen to The Message in preparation for the class. For your essay you will be assigned a reflection analyzing hop hip hop was the creation of a larger social movement and not just a musical revolution (due 2/12).

FEBRUARY 10: POVERTY AND BLING BLING: WHEN THE POOR ARRIVE (SUCCESS AS DEFINED BY DRUG AND GANG CULTURE)



The modern era of rap has been called the Ice Age because so much of the music focuses only on money and the benefits it brings. In this class we will explore how selling out was historically and is currently defined in the world of rap and what happens politically and to the music when the poor “arrive.” We will also analyze the role of arriving and how it connected to traditional notions of drug dealer and criminal displays of wealth in the ghetto. You will have discussion questions after class.

FEBRUARY 12: WEST COAST VIBES: THE CONTEXT FOR GANGSTA RAP



Through excerpts from Crips and the Bloods: Made in America and a short documentary on the Black Panthers, we will explore the transition of rap music to the west coast and the influence of gang culture on rap music. You will be assigned Boyz in the Hood (Eazy E) as your follow-up song reflection. For class please read “The Black Panther Party’s Ten Point Plan and Platform” from Bobby Seal’s Seize the Time.

FEBRUARY 17: 6 AM IN THE MORNING: GANGSTA RAP, NWA AND SOMETHING NEW



We will explore the rise of gangsta rap and its movement to the West Coast, including the establishment of NWA. We will explore what has changed contextually since the rise of gangsta rap and what has stayed the same. For class, read the Introduction to Ronin Ro’s Gangsta: Merchandising the Rhymes of Violence. For your essay you will be asked to critically compare the landmark gangsta rap album Straight Outta Comtpon (NWA) with the The Black Panther Party’s Ten Point Platform for similarities and differences (due 2/24). You will also be assigned a comparison between “Gangsta, Gangsta” by NWA (1988) and “Gangsta by ScHoolboy Q (2014).

FEBRUARY 19: NATURE OF THE BEEF: FROM THE STREETS TO THE BOARDROOM



Through the classic beef between NWA and Ice Cube and then later between Dr. Dre and Eazy E, we will explore the way the business of rap harkens back to the street criminal culture of the music, including its connection to violence, street credibility and crime. You will have discussion questions after class.

FEBRUARY 24: KEEPING IT REAL: STUDIO VS REAL



Through excerpts from the MC Documentary and your reading we will explore the pressure in rap music for consistency between the music and the life of the artist, especially related to drugs, gangs and crime. For class please read “Authenticity Within Hip Hop and Other Cultures Threatened with Assimilation” by Kembrew McLeod from That’s the Joint. You will be assigned Ill Mind of Hopsin by Hopsin and Kill Mind of Hopsin by Luni Mofo as a journal reflection on the value of “keepin’ it real” and representing the places you are from.

FEBRUARY 26: KEEPING IT REAL: THE CONSEQUENCES OF FAKING IT



Through case studies of 50 Cent-Ja Rule and Rick Ross-GD beefs we will explore the real life violent consequences of rap artists exaggerating their real life exploits in crime and drugs in their music. For class please read “Keeping It Real” by Tricia Rose from The Hip Hop Wars. You will have discussion questions after class.

MARCH 3: TUPAC: THE MYTH, THE MAN AND THE LEGEND UNPACKED



Tupac represents many of the challenges of keeping it real and authenticity in rap music as well as the movement from east coast to west coast and some of the resulting tensions. We will explore Thug Life as a controversial call to authenticity and the role Pac’s death and music has had on rap as a genre and a political force. Please have listened to the Tupac documentary (BBC, 2015) BEFORE class paying special attention to issues of authenticity. You will be assigned a reflection essay critically analyzing the role of “keepin’ it real” and if you believe it encourages criminality in rap.

MARCH 5: NATIVE RAP: THE NEW (OLD) FRONTIER



We will explore the emerging artists in Native Rap and how they represent the roots of rap as well as the roots of their own cultural experience. We will look specifically at how Native rap has the same elements of criminality in it but offers an entirely different perspective on poverty and political power. For class please read “Native Tongues: A Roundtable on Hip Hop’s Global Indigenous Movement” from That’s the Joint.

MARCH 10: ROLE OF CLASS AND CRIME: WHITE RAPPERS IN BLACK FACE



White rappers are becoming more prevalent since the emergence of Eminem in the late 1990s yet there is great controversy about White rappers stealing African America/Latino culture in terms of style and criminality. This class will explore racial identity in rap and how it connected to street credibility. You will be assigned White America by Eminem as a song response. For class please read “Race and Other Four Letter Words: Eminem and the Cultural Politics of Assimilation” by Gilbert Rodman from That’s the Joint.

MARCH 12: JUST DON’T CALL IT RAP/POSTER PROJECT DISPLAYS



We will continue to explore the racial politics of rap by discussion white artists that are established and emerging and how they represent rap as a genre (or don’t) and how their music should be understood in racial and political terms.

YOUR POSTER PROJECTS ARE DUE AT THE BEGINNING OF CLASS AND WILL BE DISPLAYED DURING THIS CLASS.

MARCH 24: SELLING SEX: PIMP RAP AND MASCULINITY



Pimp rap, with roots to actual pimping criminality, is an established genre with roots in the streets and acceptance even on the radio. We will explore this music and its artists as an introduction to our conversations about masculinity, femininity, and the role of gender in rap. For class please the except from Pimps Up, Ho’s Down: Hip Hop’s Hold on Young Black Women by Denean Sharpley-Whiting.

MARCH 26: GENDER IN RAP: SEXUALITY, HYPER MASCULINTY AND MISOGYMY



Perhaps rap music’s greatest criticism is its tendency toward lyrics and videos that degrade women and girls. We will explore the role of gender, both masculinity and femininity, through the eyes of male rappers and the roles they assign to women, seeking to particularly understand the role of hyper-masculinity as it connects to sexuality, crime and the criminal code of the streets. For class please read “Hip Hop Feminist” by Joan Morgan from That’s the Joint and “There are Bitches and Hoes” by Tricia Rose in The Hip Hop Wars.

MARCH 31: GENDER IN RAP: CRIME AND SEXUALITY REDEFINED?



We will build on the discussion on the 24th by looking at the same issues through the eyes of female rapper. We will also explore the feminist critiques of rap and explore the contradictions and agreements between the two. We will also examine the role of women in criminal subcultures and how it is reflected in the music. For class please read “Can You See me Now? Am I Clear to You?” by Askhari and “If Women Ran Hip Hop” by Aya de Leon all from Home Girls Make Some Noise: Hip Hop Feminism Anthology (all of these are very short).

APRIL 2: GENDER IN RAP: WOMEN PIONEERS AND EMERGING VOICES



We will examine the careers of the women who pioneered the female voice in rap music and examine the music of its emerging female stars. What messages are the same? What has changed? Is this progress? How is female rap less criminal in nature and what terms must these artists meet when “keepin it real”? For class please read, “Empowering Self, Making Choices, Creating Spaces” by Cheryl Keyes in That’s the Joint. You will be assigned a reflection essay that critically examines either the role of race or the role of gender in rap and how it determines the nature of the music and its connection to the code of the streets (due 4/9).

APRIL 7: DRUGS AND RAP: ORIGINS



Through excerpts from Planet Rock: The Untold Story of Crack Cocaine and Hip Hop, we will explore the role of drug money, crack cocaine and the early roots of rap music. For class please read “Rap Puts Crack to Work” by Dimitri Bogazianos in Five Grams. You will have discussion questions after class.

APRIL 9: UNPACKING THE MUSIC: EXPLORING THE HIDDEN MESSAGES



Through exploration of several rap songs we will explore the language of rap music and the hidden messages of drug and gang culture that are known on the streets but not in the mainstream. These messages pass on the code of the streets to the next generation and yet go unnoticed by most consumers of rap. BEFORE class please have watched the documentary on BMF and complete the discussion questions.

APIRL 14: RAP AND DRUGS: DOPE HOUSE RECORDS CASE STUDY



We will explore the founding of Dope House Records and the criminal path of its founder, South Park Mexican. Still in business Dope House was funded entirely with drug money and represents many rap artists who came straight from the drug trade into the rap business. Please have watched to SPM documentary materials BEFORE coming to class. It will be necessary for class discussions and your discussion questions following class.

APRIL 16: NARCO CORRIDOS



We will explore the connections between music and drugs further by watching a documentary on narco corridos, music celebrating drug cartels and the violent actions of their members that is becoming popular in the United States and has been called by some “the new rap.” We will then explore the role this culture has on Latino rap more generally. You will be assigned Narco Corridos by King Lil G as the basis for your journal reflection. You will be assigned an essay that critical discusses the role drugs have played in rap music from the beginning and now, due 4/23.

APRIL 21: RAP, POLICE AND PRISONS: A LONG LEGACY



We will discuss the role rap music has played in speaking the unrest we are now seeing in Ferguson, New York and other places. We will also explore the new trend of using rap lyrics as proof of criminal wrongdoing, sometimes leading to prosecution. For class please read “The Prison Industrial Complex and Social Control” by Jeffry O. G. Ogbar from Hip Hop Revolution: The Culture and Politics of Rap and “Legal Debate about Using Boastful Lyrics” from the New York Times, 2014. You will have discussion questions after class.

APRIL 23: HIP HOP POLICING: RACIAL PROFILING



We will explore the discovery of a hip hop unit within the New York Police Department and similar units in other major cities. We will examine the reaction of police to the rap industry and whether collecting information on rap artists and the people around them is tantamount to good policing or racial profiling. You will have discussion questions after class.

APRIL 28: BRAINSICK: RAP MUSIC EXTREME EDGES



There is a portion of rap music that is known as brainsick music which appears to celebrate extreme violence, particularly against women. We explore the violence in this music and its role in rap music generally. You will be assigned I Could’ve Been by Twisted Insane and Meat Cleaver by Brotha Lynch as the basis for your journal reflection.

APRIL 30: THE POWER OF THE FREESTYLE



You can find people freestyling now everywhere from prison yards to inner city street corners to college dorm rooms. We will discuss how this is a reflection of the power of rap music to entertain, transform, and give voice. Any students wishing to freestyle (or rap) in class are welcome to demonstrate your skills in this final class.

MAY 5: FINAL PAPER DUE ONLINE BY 5PM INSTEAD OF A FINAL EXAM
NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY

POLICY STATEMENTS FOR COURSE SYLLABI
SAFE ENVIRONMENT POLICY

NAU’s Safe Working and Learning Environment Policy prohibits sexual harassment and assault, and discrimination and harassment on the basis of sex, race, color, age, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or veteran status by anyone at this university. Retaliation of any kind as a result of making a complaint under the policy or participating in an investigation is also prohibited. The Director of the Office of Affirmative Action & Equal Opportunity (AA/EO) serves as the university’s compliance officer for affirmative action, civil rights, and Title IX, and is the ADA/504 Coordinator. AA/EO also assists with religious accommodations. You may obtain a copy of this policy from the college dean’s office or from the NAU’s Affirmative Action website nau.edu/diversity/. If you have questions or concerns about this policy, it is important that you contact the departmental chair, dean’s office, the Office of Student Life (928-523-5181), or NAU’s Office of Affirmative Action (928) 523-3312 (voice), (928) 523-9977 (fax), (928) 523-1006 (TTD) or aaeo@nau.edu.


STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

If you have a documented disability, you can arrange for accommodations by contacting Disability Resources (DR) at 523-8773 (voice) or 523-6906 (TTY), dr@nau.edu (e-mail) or 928-523-8747 (fax). Students needing academic accommodations are required to register with DR and provide required disability related documentation. Although you may request an accommodation at any time, in order for DR to best meet your individual needs, you are urged to register and submit necessary documentation (www.nau.edu/dr) 8 weeks prior to the time you wish to receive accommodations. DR is strongly committed to the needs of student with disabilities and the promotion of Universal Design. Concerns or questions related to the accessibility of programs and facilities at NAU may be brought to the attention of DR or the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity (523-3312).


ACADEMIC CONTACT HOUR POLICY

Based on the Arizona Board of Regents Academic Contact Hour Policy (ABOR Handbook, 2-224), for every unit of credit, a student should expect, on average, to do a minimum of three hours of work per week, including but not limited to class time, preparation, homework, studying.


ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Integrity is expected of every member of the NAU community in all academic undertakings. Integrity entails a firm adherence to a set of values, and the values most essential to an academic community are grounded in honesty with respect to all intellectual efforts of oneself and others. Academic integrity is expected not only in formal coursework situations, but in all University relationships and interactions connected to the educational process, including the use of University resources. An NAU student’s submission of work is an implicit declaration that the work is the student’s own. All outside assistance should be acknowledged, and the student’s academic contribution truthfully reported at all times. In addition, NAU students have a right to expect academic integrity from each of their peers.

Individual students and faculty members are responsible for identifying potential violations of the university’s academic integrity policy. Instances of potential violations are adjudicated using the process found in the university Academic Integrity Policy.
RESEARCH INTEGRITY

The Responsible Conduct of Research policy is intended to ensure that NAU personnel including NAU students engaged in research are adequately trained in the basic principles of ethics in research. Additionally, this policy assists NAU in meeting the RCR training and compliance requirements of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-The America COMPETES Act (Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education and Science); 42 U.S.C 18620-1, Section 7009, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) policy on the instruction of the RCR (NOT-OD-10-019; “Update on the Requirement for Instruction in the Responsible Conduct of Research”). For more information on the policy and the training activities required for personnel and students conducting research, at NAU, visit: http://nau.edu/Research/Compliance/Research-Integrity/


SENSITIVE COURSE MATERIALS

University education aims to expand student understanding and awareness. Thus, it necessarily involves engagement with a wide range of information, ideas, and creative representations. In the course of college studies, students can expect to encounter—and critically appraise—materials that may differ from and perhaps challenge familiar understandings, ideas, and beliefs. Students are encouraged to discuss these matters with faculty.


CLASSROOM DISRUPTION POLICY

Membership in the academic community places a special obligation on all participants to preserve an atmosphere conducive to a safe and positive learning environment. Part of that obligation implies the responsibility of each member of the NAU community to maintain an environment in which the behavior of any individual is not disruptive. Instructors have the authority and the responsibility to manage their classes in accordance with University regulations. Instructors have the right and obligation to confront disruptive behavior thereby promoting and enforcing standards of behavior necessary for maintaining an atmosphere conducive to teaching and learning. Instructors are responsible for establishing, communicating, and enforcing reasonable expectations and rules of classroom behavior. These expectations are to be communicated to students in the syllabus and in class discussions and activities at the outset of the course. Each student is responsible for behaving in a manner that supports a positive learning environment and that does not interrupt nor disrupt the delivery of education by instructors or receipt of education by students, within or outside a class. The complete classroom disruption policy is in Appendices of NAU’s Student Handbook.


Effective Summer 2014

Approved UCC – 1/28/14



Approved UGC – 2/12/14


Effective Fall 2012

Yüklə 111,37 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©muhaz.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə