Integrated safeguards datasheet



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INTEGRATED SAFEGUARDS DATASHEET

APPRAISAL STAGE
I. Basic Information

Date prepared/updated: 01/10/2011

Report No.: AC5517







1. Basic Project Data




Country: Tanzania

Project ID: P107722

Project Name: Development of a National Statistical System for Tanzania

Task Team Leader: Thomas Danielewitz

Estimated Appraisal Date: December 14, 2010

Estimated Board Date: March 24, 2011

Managing Unit: AFTP2

Lending Instrument: Specific Investment Loan

Sector: General public administration sector (80%);Public administration- Other social services (20%)

Theme: Economic statistics, modeling and forecasting (50%);Poverty strategy, analysis and monitoring (40%);Other public sector governance (10%)

IBRD Amount (US$m.): 0.00

IDA Amount (US$m.): 30.00

GEF Amount (US$m.): 0.00

PCF Amount (US$m.): 0.00



Other financing amounts by source:

BORROWER/RECIPIENT 5.00

CANADA: Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) 4.89

UK: British Department for International Development (DFID) 16.17

EC: European Commission 7.11

SWEDEN: Swedish Intl. Dev. Cooperation Agency (SIDA) 0.00



Financing Gap 1.22

34.39


Environmental Category: B - Partial Assessment

Simplified Processing

Simple [X]

Repeater []

Is this project processed under OP 8.50 (Emergency Recovery) or OP 8.00 (Rapid Response to Crises and Emergencies)

Yes [ ]

No [X]


2. Project Objectives

To develop a national statistical system that delivers reliable and timely statistics in accordance with international standards and best practices


3. Project Description

The project aims to support the implementation of the Tanzania Statistical Master Plan (TSMP) and comprises six components:

The project represents a total investment of an estimated $64.4 million, of which $30 million will be financed by IDA. Each component is described below.

Component A: Legal and Institutional Development. This will support a comprehensive organizational restructuring of the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) and the Office of the Chief Government Statistician (OCGS) of Zanzibar. Key elements are improvements in management and administration practices, including financial management, human resource management, and communications across Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) and Local Government Authorities (LGAs); and the revision of existing statistics legislation and regulations, so that NBS becomes an autonomous government agency. The legal reform will change the status of NBS from an Executive Government Agency under the Ministry of Finance and Economic Affairs to an Independent Public Office governed by an Executive Board of Governors. The primary role of the Board will be to safeguard the professional and technical independence and integrity of the National Statistical System and to hold the Director General of NBS accountable for his/her performance. The Board will also ensure that statistical activities across the National Statistical System (NSS) are harmonized and coordinated. These improvements will enhance coordination of the activities of NSS and result in a better and improved dissemination of statistical outputs to decision- makers, researchers and the general public. The changed status will also allow NBS to develop and implement a new staff scheme of service whereby staff compensation will rest more on a competitive, performance-based core salary and less on arbitrary allowances. This has been identified as a prerequisite for any lasting improvements in HR management as described in Component B.

Component B: Human Resource Development. The lack of skills needed to manage and operate an effective and efficient statistical system has been identified as major constraints in the NBS, OCGS and most MDAs. Activities will be the development of a human resources management strategy, implementation of new job profiles and salary scales for NBS and OGCS, implementation of a new career structure and a performance management system that provides rewards and incentives for good performance, improvement of management skills for statisticians and others with managerial responsibility, and improvement of skills of staff responsible for budgeting and procurement. A professional statistical training program will be developed and implemented for statistical staff, utilizing local universities and training centers.

Component C: Development of Statistical Infrastructure. This component will improve the underlying systems needed to maintain a National Statistical System. The project will invest in the central business register of establishments and enterprises; the national master sampling frame for household-based censuses and sample surveys; a compendium of concepts, definitions, and methodologies for application in statistical data collections and analysis; a spatial Geographical Information System (GIS) for providing maps for survey field work and for providing the basis for dissemination of geographically-disaggregated and referenced statistical data; and national classifications of economic and social statistics. The infrastructure developed in this component will be used to ensure standardized concepts, definitions, and methods are applied by NBS, OGCS and MDAs. The GIS activities will build on existing work, and will establish a GIS unit in OCGS, as well as improve the GIS database in use in NBS.

Component D: Data Collection, Development and Dissemination. This component focuses on improving the quality, use and timeliness of socio-economic data. The data sources of these data (either surveys or routine data systems) will be improved. Equally important, improvement of user access to available socio-economic statistics using new technologies will be established. To achieve this, the project will strengthen routine data collection, storage, compilation, statistical analysis, reporting and communication within the NSS; and improve (macro and micro) social and economic statistics within the NSS. It includes activities to improve the use of statistical data by policy-makers and other key users, and to develop and implement a data access and dissemination policy, consistent with relevant legislation and international best practice.

Component E: Physical Infrastructure and Equipment. The existing accommodation for both NBS and OCGS offices are dilapidated and extremely cramped, and severely constrain the ability of staff to perform their duties effectively. New office buildings will be constructed for NBS and OCGS; the NBS building will aim to accommodate 200 staff and the new OCGS head office is planned to accommodate 80 staff. Both buildings will contain a computer centre, conference and training rooms and library facilities. Renting new office space has been considered but has been found to be uneconomical in the long-term. Investments will also be made in upgraded information technology and communications infrastructure - primarily computers and networking equipment, and appropriate vehicles and other equipment needed to collect, process and disseminate of statistical data in NBS, OGCS, MDAs and LGAs.

Component F: Project Management. This component will finance project management, monitoring and evaluation activities. DPs have agreed to set up a TSMP Basket Fund to be managed by a TSMP Coordination Team comprising core NBS staff under overall responsibility of the Director General. Basket fund management will be a new function for NSB at a time when it is lacking adequate capacity and experience in sector-wide project management. The project will therefore finance few temporary posts under technical assistance arrangements for an experienced statistics management expert familiar with national statistics systems in Africa region. This consultant will work with the TSMP coordinator in the areas of strategic management, NSS coordination, and on reporting to the Joint Government/Statistics DPs Steering Committee (JSC). Other temporary staff may also be financed from Basket Fund to work on the project on full time basis during its initial phase, including a procurement specialist, financial management specialist, and IT specialist. These specialists are expected to ensure compliance with the procurement, disbursement, and FM policies and procedures, as well as train staff across NSS on fiduciary practices and good use of IT facilities. Within the first two years of the project implementation, core NBS staff will take over these responsibilities.
4. Project Location and salient physical characteristics relevant to the safeguard analysis

The project is national in scope. However, the only activities with possible environmental impacts stem from the construction of two new office buildings of the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and Office of Chief Government Statistician (OCGS) in Unguja, Zanzibar. These buildings are both being constructed within well-developed urban areas. In Dar es Salaam, the site is currently occupied by an unused building that will be demolished. In Unguja, the site is undeveloped.


5. Environmental and Social Safeguards Specialists

Ms Ann Jeannette Glauber (AFTEN)

Ms Jane A. N. Kibbassa (AFTEN)

Mr Juma Kayonko (AFTPR)




6. Safeguard Policies Triggered

Yes

No

Environmental Assessment (OP/BP 4.01)

X




Natural Habitats (OP/BP 4.04)




X

Forests (OP/BP 4.36)




X

Pest Management (OP 4.09)




X

Physical Cultural Resources (OP/BP 4.11)




X

Indigenous Peoples (OP/BP 4.10)




X

Involuntary Resettlement (OP/BP 4.12)




X

Safety of Dams (OP/BP 4.37)




X

Projects on International Waterways (OP/BP 7.50)




X

Projects in Disputed Areas (OP/BP 7.60)




X


II. Key Safeguard Policy Issues and Their Management

A. Summary of Key Safeguard Issues

1. Describe any safeguard issues and impacts associated with the proposed project. Identify and describe any potential large scale, significant and/or irreversible impacts:

The anticipated impacts of the TZ STATCAP will solely come from the construction of new office buildings of the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and Office of Chief Government Statistician (OCGS) in Unguja, Zanzibar. The impacts are expected to be short term, site specific, confined and reversible and can be managed through well defined mitigation and monitoring measures. Potential negative impacts that could arise during construction include creation of debris during demolition and site clearing; pollution of air, land and water resources arising from equipment emissions, workshops, and waste disposal during and after construction, soil erosion and improper drainage of storm water. Potential social impacts that may arise include negative effects on health due to air pollution and noise during construction; and blockage of access during construction. These will be short-lived and localized impacts, all of which are addressed through the project Environmental Management Plan.
2. Describe any potential indirect and/or long term impacts due to anticipated future activities in the project area:

None
3. Describe any project alternatives (if relevant) considered to help avoid or minimize adverse impacts.

In accordance with Government of Tanzania requirements, the project undertook a full Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for each building. The EIAs include an Environmental Management Plan (EMP) outlining the specific measures to be implemented to mitigate against identified impacts. In the project instance, the EMPs are focused on managing the direct construction impacts associated with construction in an urban area.

The EIA report will be disclosed in-country and through the Bank#s Infoshop. It will also be subject to public consultation prior to finalization.

A review of the institutional capacities of the implementing institutions revealed that there is adequate institutional and regulatory capacity for environmental management at national level. The national legal framework for environmental management in Tanzania spells out the roles and responsibilities of different government Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDA) and other stakeholders. The Environmental Management Act (EMA), 2004 (Act No. 20 of 2004) represents a comprehensive framework law on environmental protection and management in Tanzania. Among other things, the Act provide for legal and institutional framework for sustainable management of environment; principles for management, impact and risk assessments, prevention and control of pollution, waste management, environmental quality standards, public participation, compliance and enforcement; and implementation of international instruments on environment. It also provide for the National Environment Management Council (NEMC), which is the national body for enforcing environmental legislation and compliance.
4. Describe measures taken by the borrower to address safeguard policy issues. Provide an assessment of borrower capacity to plan and implement the measures described.

A review of the institutional capacities of the implementing institutions revealed that there is adequate institutional and regulatory capacity for environmental management at national level. The national legal framework for environmental management in Tanzania spells out the roles and responsibilities of different government Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDA) and other stakeholders. The Environmental Management Act (EMA), 2004 (Act No. 20 of 2004) represents a comprehensive framework law on environmental protection and management in Tanzania. Among other things, the Act provide for legal and institutional framework for sustainable management of environment; principles for management, impact and risk assessments, prevention and control of pollution, waste management, environmental quality standards, public participation, compliance and enforcement; and implementation of international instruments on environment. It also provide for the National Environment Management Council (NEMC), which is the national body for enforcing environmental legislation and compliance.

The Environmental Impact Assessment and Audit Regulations No.349 of 2005 made pursuant to Section 82 (1) and 230 (h) and (q) of the EMA, prescribes the stages and the EIA process, which are in principal managed by the NEMC. The regulations provide the procedures and requirements for undertaking ElAs for various types of development projects with significant environmental impacts. NEMC is expected to have necessary environmental capacity to coordinate and oversee environmental management issues in the country.
5. Identify the key stakeholders and describe the mechanisms for consultation and disclosure on safeguard policies, with an emphasis on potentially affected people.

Key stakeholders related to the construction of the two office buildings are the owners and residents of nearby properties. The EIAs outline the measures taken to consult with such persons. The EIAs are also being publically consulted prior to finalization.





B. Disclosure Requirements Date







Environmental Assessment/Audit/Management Plan/Other:

Was the document disclosed prior to appraisal?

N/A




Date of receipt by the Bank

12/08/2010




Date of "in-country" disclosure

12/15/2010




Date of submission to InfoShop

12/15/2010




For category A projects, date of distributing the Executive Summary of the EA to the Executive Directors







Resettlement Action Plan/Framework/Policy Process:

Was the document disclosed prior to appraisal?







Date of receipt by the Bank







Date of "in-country" disclosure







Date of submission to InfoShop







Indigenous Peoples Plan/Planning Framework:

Was the document disclosed prior to appraisal?







Date of receipt by the Bank







Date of "in-country" disclosure







Date of submission to InfoShop







Pest Management Plan:

Was the document disclosed prior to appraisal?







Date of receipt by the Bank







Date of "in-country" disclosure







Date of submission to InfoShop







* If the project triggers the Pest Management and/or Physical Cultural Resources, the respective issues are to be addressed and disclosed as part of the Environmental Assessment/Audit/or EMP.

If in-country disclosure of any of the above documents is not expected, please explain why:





C. Compliance Monitoring Indicators at the Corporate Level (to be filled in when the ISDS is finalized by the project decision meeting)







OP/BP/GP 4.01 - Environment Assessment




Does the project require a stand-alone EA (including EMP) report?

Yes

If yes, then did the Regional Environment Unit or Sector Manager (SM) review and approve the EA report?

Yes

Are the cost and the accountabilities for the EMP incorporated in the credit/loan?

Yes

The World Bank Policy on Disclosure of Information




Have relevant safeguard policies documents been sent to the World Bank's Infoshop?

Yes

Have relevant documents been disclosed in-country in a public place in a form and language that are understandable and accessible to project-affected groups and local NGOs?

N/A

All Safeguard Policies




Have satisfactory calendar, budget and clear institutional responsibilities been prepared for the implementation of measures related to safeguard policies?




Have costs related to safeguard policy measures been included in the project cost?




Does the Monitoring and Evaluation system of the project include the monitoring of safeguard impacts and measures related to safeguard policies?




Have satisfactory implementation arrangements been agreed with the borrower and the same been adequately reflected in the project legal documents?






D. Approvals


Signed and submitted by:

Name

Date

Task Team Leader:

Mr Thomas Danielewitz

12/14/2010

Environmental Specialist:

Ms Ann Jeannette Glauber

12/13/2010

Social Development Specialist







Additional Environmental and/or Social Development Specialist(s):

Mr Juma Kayonko

12/13/2010










Approved by:







Regional Safeguards Coordinator:

Ms Alexandra C. Bezeredi

12/13/2010

Comments:

Sector Manager:

Ms Kathie L. Krumm

12/15/2010

Comments:


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