Responses received from 40 Councils

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Preparedness for an Ageing Population
August 2007

A project funded under the

South Australian Local Government

Research and Development Scheme





Project Consultant:

Kate Reynolds

Adelaide

0412 637 387

katereyn@gmail.com

Table of Contents

1. Introduction


2. Methodology
3. Survey Results
4. Interview Findings
5. Conclusion
6. Recommendations

Appendix 1 – Survey Questions


Appendix 2 – List of people interviewed
Appendix 3 – List of documents provided by respondents
Appendix 4 – Responses from stakeholder organisations

1. Introduction
Australia, like most OECD countries, has an ageing population and the SA Local Government Association recognises that South Australia needs to be well prepared to play its part in meeting the future needs of the state’s older population.
By 2051 almost 31% of the state’s population will be over 65 and the over 85 population will have increased four fold. The rest of Australia can also expect by about 2051 that for the first time in our history the number of people over 65 will outnumber children under 15. There are more recent projections that suggest this point could now be reached as early as 2012 in South Australia and 2019 in Australia as a whole.1
To assist Councils, the Australian Local Government Association (ALGA) has entered into a partnership with the Federal Government Department of Health and Ageing to help Local Government meet the specific opportunities and challenges of an ageing population.
The Planning for an Ageing Community project began work in 2003 to:


  • develop the awareness and capacity of local government to address and plan for an ageing population, including the development of a more age-friendly built environment

  • facilitate exchange of best practice information on practical responses to population ageing within the Local Government sector

  • promote issues raised in the National Strategy for an Ageing Australia of particular relevance to Local Government

  • encourage and assist Local Government authorities to develop plans that address both the problems and opportunities of population ageing and which integrate social, economic and physical planning considerations

  • provide advice on impediments in existing local planning and building processes to the timely completion and certification of aged care facilities

In February 2006 the State Government released Improving with Age: Our Ageing Plan for South Australia.


We want our Ageing Plan to be a wake up call. We must stop thinking old.

The ageing of many countries like Australia is one of the most significant social trends of our time. In South Australia we are ageing faster than other states. We don’t see that this counts against us—rather it gives us a unique opportunity to position the State to respond well to what now, and in the next half of the century, can only be described as a social revolution.”
Improving with Age2 focuses on:


  • Enabling choice and independence—in where we live, in getting around, connecting to our community and staying healthy.

  • Valuing and recognising contribution—in our work, as grandparents, carers and as volunteers.

  • Providing safety, security and protection—in our homes, communities and as consumers.

  • Delivering the right services and the right information—timely, responsive and tailored to the needs of individuals.

  • Staying in front—through research, innovative practices and collaboration with others.

In March 2004 the State Government launched South Australia’s Strategic Plan. Objective 2 stated:
Our priorities are to focus on further improving our quality of life and the wellbeing of the community and individual citizens. The focus will be on being healthier and fitter, having less crime and feeling safer. The emphasis will be placed on preventative measures including education programs.
One of the Key Points under Objective 2 was to ‘Address the challenge of an ageing population’.
In January 2007 the State Government launched the update of South Australia’s Strategic Plan but it no longer includes any reference to an ageing population.
In announcing its plans to regionalise the plan, the Government said that “Local councils and regional development boards will be central players for regionalising SASP”.3
The report of the LGA’s 2005 Independent Inquiry into the Financial Sustainability of Local Government has put the issue of financial resourcing of service delivery and infrastructure at the forefront of Councils’ minds. This survey, whilst it does not address the costs of current or future delivery of age related services and infrastructure, provides information which will assist Councils to understand some of the key issues facing Local Government in South Australia. An important issue for Councils is to ensure they, and the other spheres of government and the non-government sector, are using their resources effectively.
In particular Local Government is keen to ensure that councils are to have the financial capacity to deliver on those key outcomes in South Australia’s Strategic Plan that are reliant on an efficient and effective Local Government sector and that the sector is well positioned to negotiate with the State and Federal governments on level terms, including clarifying roles and responsibilities and agreeing on joint activities.
The ageing population in SA has resulted in changes to community expectations and an increase in the number of clients requiring a range of ageing related services and infrastructure.
The Project Brief was to:


  • Prepare a survey of Councils to determine their preparedness for an ageing population, knowledge of issues and demographic trends, existing and proposed programs and other relevant issues.




  • Collate, analyse and report on the results of the survey and include recommendations.

(At the time of this study the LGA undertook a parallel study into the Local Government’s current and future involvement with the Home & Community Care Program. The issues raised in this report are to some degree also relevant to this separate report entitled “Local Government’s Participation in the HACC Program”.)


2. Methodology
Following notification in various LGA circulars, the survey (Appendix 1) was sent in November 2006 by the LGA to all 68 Councils in South Australia. Responses were received from nearly two-thirds of the State’s 68 Councils (22 rural Councils, 18 metropolitan Councils) until January 2007.

Adelaide City Council

Adelaide Hills Council

Alexandrina Council

City of Burnside

City of Charles Sturt

City of Holdfast Bay

City of Marion

City of Mitcham

City of Mount Gambier

City of Norwood Payneham and St Peters

City of Onkaparinga

City of Playford

City of Port Adelaide Enfield

City of Port Augusta

City of Port Lincoln

City of Prospect

City of Salisbury

City of Tea Tree Gully

City of Victor Harbor

City of West Torrens

Clare and Gilbert Valleys Council

Corporation of the Town of Walkerville

District Council of Barunga West

District Council of Ceduna

District Council of Cleve

District Council of Copper Coast

District Council of Franklin Harbour

District Council of Grant

District Council of Karoonda East Murray

District Council of Orroroo Carrieton

District Council of Streaky Bay

District Council of Tumby Bay

District Council of Yankalilla

District Council of Yorke Peninsula

Kingston District Council

Renmark Paringa Council

Rural City of Murray Bridge

Town of Gawler

Wakefield Regional Council

Wattle Range Council

Face to face interviews (Appendix 1) were conducted during December and January with three metropolitan councils and three rural councils to elicit further insight, details and recommendations.


The following organisations were invited to make comment (Appendix 4):

  • Aged and Community Services SA&NT Inc.

  • Aged Care Association Australia SA Inc. (ACAASA)

  • Aged Rights Advocacy Service Inc. (ARAS)

  • Carers SA

  • Council on the Ageing SA Inc. (COTA).


Of the above, the following organisations provided comment (Appendix 4).

  • Aged and Community Services SA&NT Inc.

  • Carers SA.

3. Survey Results
(A detailed summary of the information provided by respondents can be supplied upon request to the LGA).
The majority of metropolitan respondents were Managers of Council departments (eg Community Services) or Planning Officers. The majority or rural respondents were CEOs or Managers.
40 councils responded to the Survey.
Questions 6 – 8 related to demographic data.


  • The majority of metropolitan Councils have current demographic data (mostly sourced from ABS, Social Health Atlases and private consultants) which includes some breakdown of over 65yo and over 80yo and includes some projections to 2016.

  • The majority of rural respondents (both small and regional) reported having very little information.

  • Half the respondents do not know the rate of ageing and the majority did not know how their Council’s rate compared to the rest of the state.

  • The majority of councils do not know how the characteristics of their older population will change between now and 2020.

  • Comments related to the difficulty of both accessing and interpreting ABS data (particularly by rural Councils) and the need for more, and more easily interpreted future projections. A number of rural Councils indicated that they rely entirely on the regional health services for information.


Questions 9 - 10 related to Council Plans.


  • 8 metropolitan and 14 rural Councils reported that meeting the needs of an ageing population was specifically mentioned in their Council’s Strategic Plan.

  • 5 metropolitan and 2 rural Councils reported that their Council has a separate Plan to meet the needs of older people. Notably, both rural Councils have an established Ageing Taskforce.

  • 4 metropolitan and 6 rural Councils reported that their Council has resolved to develop such a Plan.

Plans (either Strategic or Age-specific) mentioned ageing in relation to the following topics:




3 - Economic Development

3 - Finance

4 - Parks & Gardens

5 - Arts & Culture

5 - Traffic and Transport

5 - Human Resources

7 - Planning

7 - Policy Development




8 - Infrastructure & Engineering

8 - Communication & Marketing

8 - Libraries

8 - Community Development

9 - Care and Support Services

9 - Community Consultation

9 - Community Services

9 - Recreation & Leisure



9 - Volunteering


Questions 11 – 12 related to the impact of an ageing population on Council activities.





None

Minor

Moderate

Major

Don’t Know

Residential Care Facilities







X







HACC Program










X




Health & Wellbeing Programs







X

X




Information Services & Programs







X

X




Cultural Facilities & Programs







X







Housing Services & Programs







X

X




Sporting Facilities & Programs







X







Recreation & Leisure Fac. & Progs







X







Transport Services










X




Volunteer Management







X

X




Community Safety







X

X




Community Development







X

X




Economic Development







X






Infrastructure Develop.







X






Planning & Development







X











None

Minor

Moderate

Major

Don’t Know

Revenue Raising







X

X




Strategic Planning







X

X




Human Resource Management







X







Questions 13 - 19 related to awareness of ageing issues and resources by Council’s Elected Members, Management and Staff, and involvement by internal and external committees in planning and implementing strategies to meet the needs of an ageing population.


  • The majority or both metropolitan and rural Councils reported awareness to be high or moderate amongst Elected Members and Managers and moderate to low amongst other staff.

  • The majority of metropolitan Councils reported that there were a number of internal and external community services and social planning committees who were very involved or involved in planning to meet the needs of an ageing population. (Many included managers/senior staff and operated at a regional level.)

  • The majority of rural Councils reported that either individual staff (usually the Community Services Officer) were responsible for both developing and implementing plans. One third reported that external agencies were not very involved.

  • Just over half of the Councils reported that no specific resources had been allocated. Comments included the fact that no additional resources had been made available after the development and approval of Ageing specific Plans/Strategies.

  • Only one-third of Councils reported awareness of the following resources

  • Planning for an Ageing Community website www.alga.asn.au/policy/healthAgeing/ageing/

  • Australian Local Government Population Ageing Action Plan 2004-2008

  • Age-Friendly Built Environments – Opportunities for Local Government (ALGA)

  • Improving with Age – Our Ageing Plan for South Australia (SA Government).

  • Only one quarter of Councils knew of ALGAs ‘Awareness into Action’.

  • Just over half of the Councils reported they had staff with relevant expertise.


Questions 20 – 24 related to opportunities, challenges, leadership and gaps in services.
Councils identified opportunities in four main categories

  • improved collaboration/partnerships

  • greater involvement by older people (decision making and volunteering)

  • improved employment opportunities/conditions for older people

  • improved services to community.

Councils identified challenges in relation to:



  • establishing and maintaining workable partnerships

  • provision of community infrastructure

  • other priorities competing for available funds (expressed repeatedly by rural councils) and continuing cost shifting to local government

  • increasing complexity of needs of individual clients

  • workforce supply and demand.

Respondents identified gaps in funding and access to expertise (especially for small and rural councils) and workforce issues as significant.


Almost all Councils believe that all three spheres of government should be working in collaboration with community based service providers to address issues and strategies related to South Australia’s ageing population. However most rural respondents stressed that their councils do not have the capacity to any provide new or expanded services without additional resources being provided by the State or Federal governments. Those Councils with Ageing Taskforces highlighted the continuing role the Taskforces could/should play in both planning and implementation.
Questions 25 & 26 - respondents recommended action by the LGA in the following areas.


  1. Lobby to have Councils given a greater role by State and Federal governments and their agencies on decisions about ageing related initiatives and changes

  2. Lobby State and Federal governments for improved/realistic funding if Councils are expected to begin, continue or expand service provision

  3. Address the current inequity by persuading OFTA to provide realistic and medium-to-long-term funding for every region to develop/maintain an Ageing Taskforce

  4. Initiate and or support funding submissions for Councils to develop local/regional Ageing Strategy/Plans and research projects

  5. Develop a template for an Ageing Strategy

  6. Continue education across local government sector to acknowledge impact of an ageing population

  7. Assist with development of meaningful KPIs

  8. Assist with the design of policy development and resource sharing models

  9. Identify and map what is occurring (service provision/partnerships/projects) around the state

  10. Provide of specialist advice to Councils

  11. Develop Memorandums of Understanding with other stakeholders eg HACC, Dept Transport, SACOSS etc.

A number of rural councils listed the range of issues/demands they are grappling with at the moment and stressed that limited financial and human resources mean they do not have the capacity to initiate improvement to planning or service provision either at this time or in the near future.


4. Interview Findings
Leadership


  • All interviewees expressed the view that leadership must be shown by all three spheres of government working in collaboration.

  • Most interviewees expressed a lack of confidence in the effectiveness of The Ageing Plan for South Australia (Improving wth Age) as a tool for preparing for an ageing population.

  • Most interviewees expressed the view that Local Government in SA must work harder to persuade the State and Federal Governments to take a more genuine approach to working in partnership. Most interviewees expressed concern about the State Governments willingness to engage in meaningful partnerships given the shifting of responsibilities to local government via the State Strategic Plan.

  • Most interviewees expressed the view that consultation by Government agencies (and State agencies in particular) is insufficient to support the development of true partnerships.

  • Interviewees highlighted the need for ageing issues to be seen by the State Government (and its agencies) and by some Councils as wider than the provision of HACC services.

They always ask us too little and too late.”


Despite all the words in all the reports, they’re generally not at all interested in hearing what we have to say.”
It’s time that they recognized us as partners, not as just service providers”
HACC should be a tool, not the driver. It should be one product, not the tick a box quick fix to service provision – because it’s not.”
Council activities


  • Interviews all expressed the view that an ageing population will have an impact on council’s revenue (at least in the short and medium terms) – either in terms of reducing revenue from rates, or more significantly, increasing costs to Councils through increased staffing requirements, the need to provide services to more older people and increased infrastructure costs.

  • All interviewees spoke about the need for their Council to carefully what (planning and/or service delivery) should be the responsibility of local government and what should be the responsibility of State or Federal governments.

  • Interviewees expressed an interest in participating in a formal LGA sponsored event to discuss how responsibilities can be shared between the three spheres of government.

  • All interviewees spoke about the need to, as part of their regular planning and reporting processes, consider which services can best be provided by their Council and which can best be provided by other community, private or public agencies.

  • All interviewees expressed concern about State and Federal government shifting costs to local government.

  • Rural interviewees highlighted the wide range of issues their councils are currently struggling with and noted that rural councils would find it extremely difficult to expand their range of services beyond what they can offer now.

  • Rural interviewees highlighted their concerns about access to expertise to assist them plan for population changes.

It’s hard enough for us to cover the absolute basics for older people now, let alone when the list of basics is expected to increase.”


Regional Collaboration Projects / Positive Ageing Taskforces
The Office for The Ageing currently funds a number of regional collaboration projects, auspiced by Councils, which aim to improve service and program reform, coordination and collaboration at a regional level with the intention of improving consumer outcomes for the Home and Community Care (HACC) target populations. Funding for these projects is not recurrent. Typically these projects involve planning and implementation of collaborative work by Councils, local Health Services, Divisions of General Practice and a range of private and community based providers of health, housing and other services. Projects have been in place for between 8 years and 18 months. The Regional Collaboration Projects and the Positive Ageing Taskforces have developed Strategic Plans to drive both planning and implementation of the work to be undertaken by the participating organisations.
Interviewees stressed the value of local knowledge and networks in the development of regional efforts and cautioned against a ‘homogenised’ (ie statewide or centralised) approach to collaborative planning.
Some interviewees expressed their continuing disappointment with the “we’ll fix it when it’s broken approach” taken by State and Federal government representatives whose participation at times appears to be reluctant.
Given the achieved outcomes in the areas of coordination, collaboration and generation of new funds,

both metropolitan and rural interviewees expressed their support for their projects to continue but with a greater degree of funding certainty.


The planning and improvements we’ve managed so far simply would not have happened without the funds from OFTA.”
At the time of the interviews rural Projects had been attempting for some time to establish OFTA’s intentions in relation to the projects which had reached the conclusion of their funding period. Interviewees expressed their frustration at the lack of timely communication by OFTA and felt the work undertaken by the Taskforces and their Project Officers was being undervalued. Some interviewees expressed the view that the auspicing Councils were, due to competition for resources, unlikely to continue participation if OFTA was not willing to maintain a realistic financial contribution.
Since that time funding has been allocated for the projects to continue – again on a one-off basis.
As at July 2007 OFTA was unable to provide to this project a statement of its position on the future of the Collaborative Projects.
Those interviewees without Collaborative Projects in their regions expressed frustration about the lack of equity in funding within in as well as across regions. They asked that the LGA seek, as a matter of urgency, to have OFTA allocate recurrent funds for every region in the state to undertake collaborative work on ageing issues.
In summary
The face to face interviews reinforced the information gathered from the surveys.
Two councils raised concerns about the intersection between services/plans/issues for people with a disability and the ageing population. Their view is that local government is not yet well prepared for a surge in demand for improved/increased infrastructure and services as the needs of the two groups converge over time.
In general, larger councils (ie those with greater financial and human resources) expressed the view that they are reasonably well prepared to meet the challenges of ageing population but were concerned that other key stakeholders were unwilling to acknowledge the impact of population ageing on Council activities, or were intending to continue shifting both cost and responsibility to local government.
In general, small rural councils expressed the view that financial and staffing constraints make it extremely difficult for them to improve/increase their activities, and almost impossible to initiate new activities. Any assistance provided by the LGA to help their staff and elected members respond to population change will be welcomed.
5. Conclusion
The survey data and interviews showed that there is considerable variation between councils about the level of understanding and commitment from key decision makers to responding to population ageing in South Australia.
Whilst most metropolitan councils and some of the larger regional Councils have developed either their own or a regional ageing strategy or are actively working towards a plan to respond to population ageing, the smaller councils expressed a need for more guidance and practical assistance on how to commence the strategic planning process. They also expressed a very clear for additional resources if this planning is to be achieved in the near future.
As part of its broader Local Government Financial Sustainability program, Local Government in South Australia needs to develop a clearer understanding of the current and future expectations and capacity of both councils and other key players, including the other spheres of government and private and community providers of services and infrastructure.
The survey responses show that Councils want to the sector to be able to negotiate with the State and Federal governments on level terms, including clarifying roles and responsibilities and agreeing on joint activities.
6. Recommendations



  1. That the LGA express the view to the State Government that the next iteration of the SA Strategic Plan should better reflect the issues of an ageing population and should place greater emphasis on the fact that South Australia now has the oldest population of all State and Territories, and will continue to do so for some time.




  1. That the LGA assist regional groupings of Councils to influence key issues related to an ageing population through the current process of ‘regionalisation’ of the South Australian Strategic Plan.




  1. That the LGA reiterates its desire to work more collaboratively with the other spheres of government for greater and broader exchange of knowledge on Healthy Ageing to both improve the quality of life of older people and to prevent costly impacts on the population as a whole.




  1. That the LGA seek to have Councils given improved opportunities by State and Federal governments and their agencies, in relation to decisions about current and future ageing related initiatives, policies and programs.




  1. That the LGA make representations to the State and Federal governments for improved/realistic funding if Councils are expected to begin, continue or expand provision of services targeted to older people.




  1. That the LGA seek to address the current inequities amongst councils by requesting that Office for The Ageing (OFTA) provide realistic and medium-to-long-term funding for every region to develop/maintain a regional planning body such as the Regional Collaboration Projects or Positive Ageing Taskforces.




  1. That the LGA maintain a close working relationship with the Local Government Community Managers Group to ensure that it receives timely and well-informed advice about issues relating to ageing.




  1. That the LGA encourage member councils to direct issues and concerns about issues related to ageing programs, services or others matters to the Local Government Community Managers Group.




  1. That the LGA and the Local Government Community Managers Group issue discussion papers and then jointly host a forum to inform their positions on the future role and capacity of the Local Government sector in relation to services and infrastructure for older people.




  1. That the LGA work with the Local Government Community Managers’ Group to develop a role statement about the parameters of sustainable involvement by local government in the provision of services and infrastructure for older people.




  1. That the LGA identify and explore opportunities to develop formal agreements of understanding with other stakeholders eg. Office for the Ageing, Department for Transport, Energy & Infrastructure, South Australian Council of Social Service etc to address issues included in this report.




  1. That the LGA encourage Councils to use the ALGA website (and in particular the Local Government Ageing Toolbox and the Ageing Strategy Register) to map developments in planning, service provision, partnerships and projects across South Australia and nationally.




  1. That the LGA explore the usefulness of developing an Ageing Strategy template for use by Councils.




  1. That the LGA source funds to assist smaller Councils develop an Ageing Strategy/Plan to align with the State’s Ageing Strategy and SA Strategic Plan.




  1. That the LGA and the Australian Local Government Association continue to build awareness of elected members and staff of the likely impact an ageing population will have on local government activities to ensure that sufficient resources are allocated across the key areas of planning, service delivery and infrastructure development.



Appendix 1 - Survey Questions

1. Name of Council


2. Name of person completing the survey
3. Title of the person completing the survey
4. Phone
5. Email
6. Does your Council have current demographic data about its population ie:
a) The number of older people living in the council area now?

Yes / No
b) The number of younger and older people moving into the council area?

Yes / No
c) The number of younger and older people moving out of the council area?

Yes / No
d) The number of older people moving within the council area?

Yes / No
e) The projected number of over 65s and over 80s in the council area in the short term (2010)?

Over 65s - Yes / No

Over 80s – Yes / No
f) The projected number of over 65s and over 80s in the council area in the medium term (2020)?

Over 65s - Yes / No

Over 80s – Yes / No
g) The projected number of over 65s and over 80s in the council area in the long term?

Over 65s - Yes / No

Over 80s – Yes / No
h) The rate of ageing in your council area (ie the size of the increase in ageing residents, sometimes described as the speed of ageing, usually expressed as a percentage)?

Yes / No
i) Do you know how the rate of ageing compares to other SA local government areas?

Yes / No
k) What are your key sources for this type of demographic information?
l) Would you rate this type of information as  easy accessible or  difficult to access?
7. a) Using the information you have available now, can you describe the projected ‘age structure’ of your council’s older population by the year 2015? (I.e. what proportion can be described as young older, older, old or very old, and what proportion can be described as healthy, at risk or frail.)
b) Do you know how this compares to the rest of South Australia and the rest of Australia?
c) What are your key sources for this type of information?
8. a) Do you know how the characteristics of the older population of your local government area (gender, income, education, general health, cultural background etc) will change between now and 2020?


  1. What are your key sources for this type of information?

9. Is planning to meet the needs of an ageing population specifically mentioned in your current Strategic Plan?


No / Yes - Please attach a copy of the relevant sections to your survey response.
10. a) Does your Council have a separate Plan/Strategy to respond to the needs of older people in

your community?


No / Yes - Please attach a copy of the Plan to your survey response.
b) If you answered No, has your Council resolved to develop such a Plan?
c) If Yes, when do you expect it to be released?
d) If your Council does have an Ageing Plan/Strategy - does it cover the following areas?
Please tick where appropriate.

  • Arts & Culture

  • Infrastructure & Engineering

  • Communication & Marketing

  • Libraries

  • Community Development

  • Planning

  • Care and Support Services

  • Parks & Gardens

  • Community Consultation

  • Policy Development

  • Community Services

  • Recreation & Leisure

  • Economic Development

  • Finance

  • Volunteering

  • Human Resources




11. How would you describe the likely impact of population ageing on the provision of the following services by your council?


(Please tick one)




None

Minor

Moderate

Major

Don’t Know

Residential Care Facilities
















Home & Community Care Program
















Health & Wellbeing Programs
















Information Services & Programs
















Cultural Facilities & Programs
















Housing Services & Programs
















Sporting Facilities & Programs
















Recreation & Leisure Facilities & Programs
















Transport Services
















Volunteer Management
















Community Safety
















Community Development
















Economic Development
















Infrastructure Development
















Planning & Development















12. How would you describe the likely impact of population ageing on the following functions of your council?


(Please tick one)




None

Minor

Moderate

Major

Don’t Know

a) Revenue Raising
















b) Strategic Planning
















c) Human Resource Management















Further comment:




  1. Revenue Raising




  1. Strategic Planning

c) Human Resource Management


13. What is the awareness of population ageing issues within your Council?


Please tick one



High

Moderate

Low

Don’t Know

Elected Members













Managers













Other Staff












14. a) Which council positions and committees are associated with developing your council’s plans to meet the future needs of its older population?


b) Have specific resources been allocated to this?
15. a) Which council positions and committees are associated with implementing your council’s plans to meet the future needs of its older population?
b) Have specific resources been allocated to this?
16. What external networks, groups or agencies are associated with developing your council’s plans to meet the future needs of its older population?
17. Would you describe these groups or agencies as  very involved,  involved or  not very involved at this stage in the planning activities?
If you selected ‘not very involved’ please suggest why this might be.
18. Are the relevant elected members, staff and committees aware of the following resources:

(Please tick)




  • Planning for an Ageing Community website www.alga.asn.au/policy/healthAgeing/ageing/ (ALGA)




  • Australian Local Government Population Ageing Action Plan 2004-2008 (ALGA)




  • Awareness into Action (ALGA)




  • Age-Friendly Built Environments – Opportunities for Local Government (ALGA)




  • Improving with Age – Our Ageing Plan for South Australia (SA Government)

19. a) Does your Council have staff with expertise in the planning and provision of services for older people?


b) If not, are you confident this will be addressed within the next 2 years?

c) If not, why not?


20. What do you see as the key opportunities for your Council when considering SA’s ageing population?
21. What do you see as the key challenges for your Council when considering SA’s ageing population?
22. Do you have comments to make about who should be responsible for addressing issues/strategies/innovation related to councils’ preparedness for an ageing population?
23. Do you have comments to make about gaps which impact on in current service provision for older South Australians and /or gaps which impact on local government’s ability to prepare for an ageing population?
24. Do you have comments to make about who should play a leadership role in ensuring that South Australia is well positioned to respond to the ageing of its population?
25. Please make recommendations for action by the LGA to assist your council plan and respond to its ageing population.

Appendix 2 – List of people interviewed

Anne O’Reilly, Manager, Aged and Children’s Services, Port Augusta City Council


Declan Moore, General Manager Community & Governance, City of West Torrens
Frank Brennan, CEO, Wattle Range Council
Kevin Sharpe, Community Development Manager, City of Prospect
Liz Bok, Manager, Manager, Community Services, Adelaide Hills Council
Reg Budarick & Gary Sawyer, Positive Ageing Taskforce Project Officer, Rural City of Murray Bridge
Stuart Purvis, Team Leader, City Services, City of Onkaparinga
Appendix 3 - Documents and websites supplied by respondents


  • City of Victor Harbor and Southern Fleurieu Positive Ageing Taskforce:

    • City of Victor Harbor Strategic Directions 2006/2009 (on website)

    • City of Victor Harbor Vacant Allotment Survey 2005 (on website)

    • City of Victor Harbor Non Resident Ratepayer Survey 2005 (on website)

    • Migration and Return Migration in the Older Population of the Southern Fleurieu Peninsula 2005

    • A Better Practice for the Development of Retirement Villages in the Southern Fleurieu 2002 (on website)

    • City of Victor Harbor Past Population Growth and Future Projections 2005 (on website)

    • Southern Fleurieu Benchmarking Project (Draft - develops tools to predict the health related needs of future populations)

    • A Framework for Social Connectivity on the Southern Fleurieu Peninsula (Draft)

    • Recreation Today and Tomorrow – Current and Future Social and Recreational Needs of Older People in the Southern Fleurieu Peninsula 2006

  • City of Marion: Strategy for Older Persons in the Marion Community 2001

  • City of Port Adelaide Enfield: Healthy Ageing Plan 2005-2010

  • City of Salisbury: Strategic Directions for an Ageing Community 2001-2004

  • City of Tea Tree Gully: Ageing Strategy 2001-2011

  • City of Victor Harbour and District Councils of Yankalilla and Alexandrina: Health and Community services for older people on the Southern Fleurieu Peninsula - A Ten Year Strategic Plan (PDF)

  • Adelaide Hills Council:

    • Community Plan 2005-2008

    • Hills Positive Ageing Project Strategic Plan

  • Adelaide City Council: Ageing Well in Adelaide – A Policy and Action Plan for 55s and Over 2006-2011

  • City of West Torrens

    • Seven Steps to Aged Care Provision

    • Submission to House of Representatives Standing Committee on Health & Ageing, Inquiry into Heath Funding

  • Port Augusta City Council: Ageing Strategy 2007-2012 (completed May 2007)

  • Rural City of Murray Bridge:

    • Murray Mallee Ageing Taskforce Aged and Disability Services Needs Analysis

    • Murray Mallee Ageing Taskforce Strategic Plan 2004/2006

  • City of Norwood Payneham & St Peters: Aged & Disability Services Strategic Plan March 2005

  • City of Charles Sturt:

    • Ageing in Charles Sturt – Strategies for Meeting the Needs of Older Residents 2002-2012

    • Ageing in Charles Sturt Action Plan 2005-2010

Northern Collaborative Project



http://cweb.salisbury.sa.gov.au/manifest/servlet/page?pg=9789&stypen=html
Appendix 4 – Responses from stakeholder organizations
(refer separate document)

1 SA Government - Improving with Age; Our Ageing Plan for South Australia

2 Page 7

3 Page 10

DME 35747 Local Government Association of South Australia


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