Bangalore response to gujarat earthquake

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Earthquake Update/Appeal No. 11: 03 March 2001
BANGALORE RESPONSE TO GUJARAT EARTHQUAKE

Visit : http://www.onlinevolunteers.org/relief/bangalore.html or http://www.lavochka.com/relief/bangalore.html for online reference to Previous Updates/Appeals


Contents:


  1. Disaster And Mental Health: Gujarat Earthquake

Caring For The Population Of The Earthquake Affected Areas

The Challenge

Lessons Of Mental Health Work From The Past Disasters In India

What Needs To Be ? Caring For The Living

Addresses For Contact Relating To Disaster And Mental Health: Gujarat Earthquake


  1. Special Issue Of Medico-Friends Circle Bulletin On Gujarat Earthquake: Call For Contributions

  2. Key Observations And Evaluation By Narmada Bachao Andolan

  3. Oxfam India Press Release: Healing The Wounds

  4. ADPSR Gujarat Earthquake Reconstruction Guidelines

  5. An Exchange Of Opinions

  6. Web Links

  7. Appeal For Funds

  8. Bangalore Response Contact Details


1. DISASTER AND MENTAL HEALTH: GUJARAT EARTHQUAKE
CARING FOR THE POPULATION OF THE EARTHQUAKE AFFECTED AREAS
THE CHALLENGE:
THE unprecedented damage to people, property and the environment presents an immense challenge to the Nation.
As the needs for food, shelter, clothing, medicines and other needs are provided it is important to recognise the impact of the disaster experience on the mental health of all the persons in the earthquake affected areas.
The persons involved is so large that it requires all innovative efforts to meet the mental health needs of the population.
LESSONS OF MENTAL HEALTH WORK FROM THE PAST DISASTERS IN INDIA:
1. MENTAL HEALTH NEEDS OF THE POPULATION EXPERIENCING DISASTERS IS REAL.
There is enough evidence from the many disasters that the population experiencing disasters has higher need for mental health care. For example the number who were found to have psychiatric illness was 139/1000 population in the Marathwada disaster population as compared to 68/1000 in the control population ,even five years after the disaster.

This increased morbidity of various psychiatric illnesses has been reported from disasters all over the world. It is generally accepted that at least 30% have continuing need for mental health care.


2.MENTAL HEALTH CARE IS A NEED OF ALL OF THE POPULATION:
The need for mental health care is by the total population experiencing the disaster. Though there is a direct correlation with the occurrence of psychiatric problems with the degree of exposure, even those who have lived in the disaster area without any losses are more vulnerable to psychiatric problems. Services should be provided to the total population and not only to those who have lost a family member or had loss of limb or other losses.
3.LOCAL RESOURCES ARE THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAY OF PROVIDING CARE:
The best approach to mental health care is to work with and utilise the local population in the care programme. This can be done by sharing the skills of caring. The external personnel have limited role in view of the cultural, linguistic and social factors which can interfere in the interventions. These resources can be general physicians, health workers, teachers, community level workers, developmental workers and the volunteers.
4.MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS HAVE AN IMPORTANT ROLE:
The role of mental health professionals is important in terms of sensitising the planners of services, training of the different categories of personnel and supporting the work of non-specialists.

They also have the responsibility of preparing educational material. In course of time they monitor the programme and evaluate the impact of the interventions.


5.LONG-TERM PLANS ARE NEEDED:
Mental health care needs are to be planned with a long -term perspective. As the Marathwada earthquake experience has shown the increased need for mental health care can be seen even after 5 years. In view of this besides, emergency services, there is need to build long-term structures and positions for professionals to provide care.
6.THERE IS NEED FOR CONTINUYOUS MONITORING OF THE NEEDS.
The mental health needs are different at different points in time. There is need to continuous monitor the need and respond to them and not hold on to a single pre-fixed programme.
7.THERE IS NEED FOR DOCUMENTATION OF THE EXPERIENCES:
In order to learn from the experiences, an essential point of intervention is the documentation of the experiences of the population, as well as that of the providers of care. These can provide information to meet future challenges. For example the current plans and ideas have come from the experiences of working with various disasters.
RESOURCES AVAILABLE FOR MENTAL HEALTH CARE IN INDIA
Two international/national organisations have been in the forefront of mental health care for the population experiencing a disaster , namely OXFAM INDIA and ACTION AID ,India. The special aspect of their work is in terms of continuously working developing a system of care, besides providing care.

The currently available resources for mental health care to meet the needs of the Gujarat Earthquake are:


1.VIDEO on PSYCHOSOCIAL CONSEQUENCES OF DISASTERS:

(prepared by OXFAM,INDIA and NIMHANS, Bangalore).This 20 minute video brings together the experiences of about two dozen experts and presents the information about the nature of mental health needs of the population, the variety of approaches, the role of different community resources, the need for professional involvement and the importance of the policy for disaster care. The video has visual footage along with interviews.



THE VIDEO IS USEFUL AS A RESOURCE FOR SENSITISING POLICYMALKERS and MANAGERS OF DISASRTER PROGRAMMES.AVAILABLE FROM OXFAM INDIA,BANGALORE-(Address given below)
2.INFORMATION BOOKLETS ON MENTAL HEALTH CARE .
Currently three booklets are available in ENGLISH. These were prepared in the setting of the ORISSA cyclone by ACTION AID ,India and NIMHANS, Bangalore in 2000.

These address the needs of


* INDIVIDUALS

* COMMUNITY LEVEL HELPERS

* TEACHERS.
These are self-help type of booklets with pictures and practical measures to care for self and others.

THESE NEED TRANSLATION TO LOCAL LANGUAGES.


Available from ACTION AID,INDIA(Address given below)
3.ICMR NEW DELHI REpoort on the Health Consequences of Marathwada Earthquake Disaster with special reference to Mental Health.
This Report provides information about the methodology of studying the morbidity as well as the interventions developed in the Marathwada earthquake. This was the joint effort of ICMR,NEW DELHI and the Maharastra Institute of Mental Health, Pune.
4. MENTAL HEALTH CONSEQUENCES OF DISASTERS-a Special Issue of

INDIAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK,October 2000.(p.521-701)
This is a very valuable publication from the Tata Institute of Social Sciences,Mumbai.

The issue has 12 articles on various aspects of the mental health needs of the disaster affected populations. It contains both theory and case studies of working with the different disasters in the country.

This is valuable for the use of professionals.
5. Action Aid experience of working with persons who have become orphans,widows using a community based approach to integrate them into the community.

This is a very new approach and is in contrast to institution based experiences.


6.Songs relating to mental health aspects of disasters developed as part of KUTCH cyclone by OXFAM, India.
The above is not a comprehensive list of all resources but illustrative of resources available easily to meet the current need.


WHAT NEEDS TO BE ? CARING FOR THE LIVING
The most important aspect of care is to recognise that the emotional needs are as important as other needs.There is need build this component into the total care programmes.
IMMEDIATE NEED:

1.Sensitisation of all leaders about the nature of mental health needs as well, as the approaches to providing the care. The video would be most useful


2.Translation of the booklets and distribution of the same to the total population as well as all care providers.
3.Provision of mental health professionals in the large hospitals/ community tent hospitals to provide emotional support to the ill persons and their families.
3.Training programmes for the middle level care providers in mental health skills .
4.Setting up of referral support from psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, psychiatric social workers and nurses. Such teams should be available for each

100 000 population to begin with.


5.Making the available manuals/ information booklets on the internet so that they can be accessed by anyone who wants to use it.
6.Using of the mental health information and the songs to create street plays, dramas to educate the public in an informal and entertaining manner.
7.Maintaining the community as the focus of care both as recipients as well as providers. A good example is what was done in ORISSA by Action AID India to meet the needs of the orphaned children.

Communities should be strengthened in all of the efforts.


8. USE OF MASS MEDIA to share the information
SHORT -TERM MEASURES(to be developed)
LONG-TERM MEASURES(to be developed)

ADDRESSES FOR CONTACT RELATING TO DISASTER AND MENTAL HEALTH:
1. ACTION AID INDIA.

INDIA OFFICE,

No.71,Uday Park,

NEW DELHI-110049.

Tel/Fax. 91-11 6510316/51, 6510349.

Email: aaindia@actionaidindia.org

2. OXFAM,INDIA,

VIJAYASHREE,

4th A Main ,Near Baptist Hospital,

HEBBAL,BANGALORE-560024.


Phone: 91 80 363 2964/ 363 3274.

Mobile:UNNI.. 91 (0) 98450 91319.

Email: unnikru@vsnl.com
3. TATA INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES,

P.O.BOX 8313,

DEONAR,MUMBAI-400088.

Phone: 91 22 556 3289/ 556 3290.

Fax: 91 22 556 2912.

Email: p_unit@tiss.edu


4. MAHARASTRA INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH,

Sassoon General Hospital Campus,

PUNE-411001,.

Phone: 91 20 6127331.

Fax: 91 20 6123738
5. INDIAN COUNCIL OF MEDICAL RESEARCH,

ANSARI NAGAR,

NEW DELHI-110029.

Fax: 91 11 6868662.

Email: icmrhqds@sansad.nic.in

6. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH AND NEUROSCIENCES,

P.O.BOX 2900,

DHARMARAM COLLEGE P.O.

BANGALORE-560029.
Phone: 91 80 6995250.

Fax: 91 80 6562121/6564830



2. Special Issue of Medico-Friends Circle Bulletin on Gujarat Earthquake: Call for Contributions
Dear friends,
Following the earthquake that struck Gujarat on January 26th, several friends were involved in the relief work. The Medico Friend Circle expresses its grief over this immense tragedy and shares the concern for the rehabilitation of the survivors. From the brief and hurried notes that we received from friends in the field, one could sense that the experience of relief work was extremely stressful, demanding and, often, frustrating. As the first phase of relief work has come to an end and plans for long-term measures are being drawn up, we would like all those who were and are still involved with the relief and rehabilitation work to share their experiences with the group. These could be articles, letters, notes, reflections, narratives or contributions in any other form.
We request you to use the bulletin as a space to share your ideas, feelings and experiences. In order to bring out the bulletin in time, it would be very helpful if these contributions reached us by the 25th of March.
You may send them by post to

Neha Madhiwalla

B/3 Fariyas, 143 August Kranti Marg

Mumbai 400036

or by email to

mfcbulletin@rediffmail.com

and mneha@vsnl.net


Sincerely,

Neha Madhiwalla

for the MFC bulletin editorial committee
3. Key Observations and Evaluation by Narmada Bachao Andolan
- There was a lack of correspondence between the requirements of relief and the material that poured in, at least initially.

- Apart from houses, the infrastructure in the villages too has been severally damaged and needs to be reconstructed. This includes school, post offices, water and electricity systems etc.

- Cattle economy is an important part of the area as are the handicrafts and both must be given proper attention.

- The Government and administration has to play the central role in the relief and reconstruction efforts.

- Water is one of the critical issues of the area, at the same time there are lots of possibilities for developing water resources. These need to be examined properly. This report also provides detailed Suggestions and Recommendations

Related to Housing, Relief and other Policy Level Issues.

From: Relief Camp for the Earthquake Affected by The Narmada Bachao Andolan, at Balasar
Full Report is Available online at:

http://www.onlinevolunteers.org/relief/nba-balasar.html


4. OXFAM India PRESS RELEASE

Bangalore, India

26th Feb 2001


Gujarat earthquake: Healing the wounds”

Community –wise rehabilitation and


People’s participation should be the focus in rehabilitation.”


Community-wise rehabilitation and people’s participation should find central places in the long-term rehabilitation programme”, says Oxfam India in its rapid need assessment report and long-term intervention plan for the earthquake affected areas. Oxfam India is a leading disaster relief, humanitarian and development agency that pressed its services in limited pockets of Gujarat that was shattered by a killer earthquake on January 26th. The report titled - “Gujarat earthquake: Healing the wounds”- calls for a people-centric long-term rehabilitation plan for the area.

“Physiotherapy based intervention to respond to the needs of the physically disabled (especially the paraplegics and those with multiple injuries of spine and limbs); Psycho-social support for the traumatised communities; Access to appropriate information to build earthquake resistant houses with the active involvement of the survivors/ community and campaigns to achieve basic rights of the disaster affected will be the key challenges for those involved in long term rehabilitation”, notes the report. Oxfam India, in association with the survivors, leading professional organisations, voluntary agencies and others has developed a long-term intervention plan for select pockets in Gujarat.


A multidisciplinary team that comprised of a leading physiotherapist, a gender and rights activist, a medical doctor, a social scientist and others conducted Oxfam India’s need-assessment mission. The report was released today, exactly a month since the disaster shattered the lives and livelihoods of thousands of people across the western Indian state of Gujarat. “With summer about to step in, the already drought hit areas in the earthquake affected areas will have to bear the shortage of water. This must be dealt with extreme urgency”, cautions the report.
There are over 90 paraplegics in the Civil Hospital Ahmedabad alone. This is not a case in isolation. With pelvic and spine fractures dominating the caseload in certain villages, the situation calls for their long-term rehabilitation. “Without physiotherapy intervention, the future of many survivors will end up in wheel chairs. In Marathwada, there are paraplegics awaiting rehabilitation even after 8 years since the killer 1993 earthquake. We need to act fast,” cautions the report. Physical disability is not a visible agenda in the rehabilitation package. Many in villages will need physiotherapy assistance at their doorstep to get their normal movements back. “The situation calls for a community based rehabilitation”, states the report.
“There has been an increased incidence of premature deliveries in some of the pockets. Anxiety levels are high amongst people”. Quoting the case of Nancy Takkar, a 12 year young girl who was the lone survivor when the killer earthquake killed over 300 of her school mates, the report says that the community was initially passing through the “heroic-phase”. Now they are in a “phase of hope and optimism”, a short lived phenomenon. People can break up with small provocations sooner or later. Flash back memories of the tragic incident can lead to emotional breakdown.
The survivors need assistance to overcome trauma and subsequent psychosocial problems they face. Past experience shows that long -term impacts of psychosocial problems are many-fold. If not handled adequately by cultural, societal and family support, it could lead to long-term emotional problems. “In Marathwada, even after 8 years, at least 30 per cent of the affected survivors require continued mental healthcare. Independent studies point out that in Marathwada, there is a sharp increase in the incidence of alcoholism, up to five times than that of the pre-earthquake situation”, the report quotes experts who had worked on this issue. According to sources, the government plans to make a short-term intervention lasting 6 to 12 weeks. “Past experience and our (Oxfam India’s) assessment shows that the situation calls for a long-term psycho-social intervention, lasting at least for 12 to 36 months,” says the report. Meanwhile, experts from National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore (NIMHANS) also calls for a long-term intervention.
Report also highlights the increased incidence of women’s health problems and incidence of chicken pox, measles, respiratory complications and water-borne diseases amongst children. “With no gynaecologists and women doctors in the relief teams and no visible signs to correct the situation, meeting the health needs of the women will be a challenge. This calls for urgent attention”, notes the report.
A people-to-people exchange programme between community groups based in other earthquake affected areas of India (like Marathwada) and Gujarat will help to facilitate a people-centric rehabilitation. The planners and policy makers need to be innovative”, notes the report. To call the attention of planners and to request them to be more sensitive to local realities and sensitivities, the report narrates the case of temporary tents that have come up in certain pockets. “The temporary tents that have come up in Adhoi spells disaster. It is a fire risk, lacks sanitation facility and was built without people’s involvement. This top down approach must be stopped”, suggests the report.
The report calls for the need to press-in the services of more veterinary doctors. It requests the media to be more alert when the rehabilitation phase begins. Efforts may have to be put to encourage the media to visit the other earthquake-affected places in India such as Marathwada, Uttarkashi and Jabalpur to report about the plight of the survivors even after so many years. This kind of reportage will help to put the issues in a broader perspective.
The report notes that many of the international humanitarian agencies are in Gujarat with a short-term agenda. It adds that the short-term interventions that most of these agencies make don’t relate to field level realities. The situation calls for a long-term commitment. “Oxfam India feels that such agencies need to rethink and redefine their operational mandate to suite the local level realities. While we understand and caution the limited role of external aid agencies, we welcome a synergy between local community-based organisations and International agencies”, adds the report.
The multidisciplinary need-assessment team conducted extensive field visits, especially to some of the less-publicised villages and focussed on some of the issues those are yet to attain importance. The team held extensive discussions with the survivors, NGOs and government officials, international relief agencies, health and other sector specialists and hospital authorities.
Oxfam India has formulated a long-term intervention strategy. The work plan for Gujarat have special focus on (a) Community Based Rehabilitation of physically disabled; (b) Psycho-social care; (c) information dissemination campaign on earthquake resistant houses, people-to-people exchange programme and construction of (to demonstrate) earthquake resistant community centres and (d) campaign for basic rights and a disaster management policy. These programmes are designed and will be implemented in partnership with the affected communities, professionals from the Indian Association of Physiotherapists, mental health experts, voluntary agencies, educational institutions; others like the St. Xavier’s Social Service Society, Ahmedabad and collaborating agencies of Bangalore Response for Gujarat Earthquake. Oxfam India has approached ordinary people and select corporate houses for financial assistance to implement the programme. It also appeals for volunteers to work on this issue for the next one year.
When the situation moves from relief to rehabilitation, the key challenge for humanitarian agencies is to shift gears from charity mode to advocacy and political action to attain basic rights”, adds Oxfam India’s report.

G.Sriramappa Dr. Unnikrishnan PV


Director Co-ordinator: Emergencies & disasters

Ph-Mobile: (0) 98451 78829 Ph- Mobile: (0) 98450 91319



Oxfam India

‘Vijaya Shree’, 4th A Main, Off Bellary Road

Hebbal, Bangalore – 560 024, Karnataka, INDIA

Ph: 91 (80) 363 3274 ; Telefax : 91 (80) 3632964

Fax : 91(80) 363 1371 (pp)

Email: oxfamindia@vsnl.com

Website: www.oxfamindia.org (Download the Full Report - 800 KB, about 60 pages with illustrations)



  1. ADPSR Gujarat Earthquake Reconstruction Guidelines - Feb.25

Natural disasters kill, injure and demolish people and property in tragic dimensions - they need not destroy local traditions and building cultures as well. While many organizations and designers view disaster reconstruction in purely technical terms, we believe that this work should achieve much more in Gujarat.

Reconstruction can never erase the loss of natural disasters but it should enable people to restore the life and meaning of their communities. The uniquely formed streets and buildings of Indian towns and villages represent centuries of complex social, spatial and architectural thought. Such places represent a cultural treasure that can not be replaced with the banal tracts of concrete boxes provided by typical post disaster reconstruction efforts.

Numerous Indian professional and community organizations share these concerns. They are eager to stem the tide of insensitive reconstruction and have the skills to do so. Many of these groups are located in Gujarat and have a unique appreciation for the region's rich cultural heritage. Unfortunately, these organizations are not well known and have little standing or contact with the (often corrupt) Indian agencies and (understandably distant) international aid sources through which reconstruction funds typically pass.

We aim to assist such groups by raising awareness of their work and funds to assist their work. To this end we shall seek out and support Indian organizations and individuals whose projects are:


  1. Socially responsible - allowing communities to participate meaningfully in planning, design and construction - because these projects enable people to obtain the buildings and social spaces they most desire.

  2. Culturally appropriate - rooted in local building and craft traditions - because these projects enable people to maintain and extend inhabitation patterns uniting new communities with the unique history from which they've grown.

  3. Environmentally sustainable - affordable and easily utilized by local artisans and builders and promote conservation of non-renewable materials and energy - because these projects maximize the utility of limited reconstruction resources while minimizing future energy, maintenance and environmental costs.

Source: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Gujarat_earthquake_committee_ADPSR


  1. An Exchange of Opinions


Bangalore Response received an email from Viniyog Parivar, a NGO in Mumbai, appealing for collaboration on the Gujarat Earthquake Relief. However, I expressed reservations in involving with this groups due to some explicit messages of discrimination and communalisation that the group propounds. Please read the response received to such concerns raised.
Regards,
Leo Saldanha
Note originally circulated to the Core Group of Bangalore Response)
Dear Friends,
Kindly be aware that the Viniyog Parivar Trust is an outfit linked with the Sangh Pariwar. They commit themselves to environment, human rights and animal rights causes (for eg. PETA's campaigns), and now are sending messages to NGOs across the country and the world about the Gujarat Earthquake relief (one such message is below).
Consider their agenda:
"Do our children carry the rich values of Aryan race which can take them to a better tommorrow ?" (from their website)
This is for your information.
Leo Saldanha

Viniyog Parivar's Response
From: viniyog@bom3

To: SAMANVAYA

Cc:

Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2001 12:45 PM

Subject: Re: Misconception about us

> Dear Shri Ram,

>

> I refer to your e-mail of 21-2-2001 with which you have forwarded to us



> the original message received from one Shri Parveen/Leo Saldanha.

>


> It is surprising how Shri Parveen or Shri Leo Saldanha or their

> organisation i.e. Environment Support Group got the notion that Viniyog

> Parivar Trust is an outfit linked with the Sangh Parivar. It is not

> true, though we do not treat Sangh Parivar as an untouchable, as is the

> fashion with the pseudo secularists. We are in no way part of their

> outfit. We are working for Jeevdaya, Jeevraksha and Sanskriti Raksha

> and in the process environment, human rights (in real sense of the term)

> and animal rights are our concerns. We have also taken up relief

> activity for the Gujarat earthquake victims. However we fail to

> understand how this puts us in a wrong box.

>

> The message has pointed out to a statement in our website i.e. "Do our



> children carry the rich values of Aryan race which can take them to a

> better tomorrow?" We also fail to understand what is offending in this

> message or `agenda' as it is called. The degradation of our rich

> heritage, morals and values particularly amongst the younger generation

> is a cause of concern and it is our duty to worry about them. Probably

> the objection seems to be to the word `Aryan race' and the psychological

> divide between `Aryan' and `Dravidian' seems to be at the root of taking

> exception to this statement. We have used `Aryan' in a broader sense of

> the term to includes all the Indians.

>


> We would welcome the Environment Support Group for a whole-hearted

> interaction with us as we are sure that we are all working for a common

> cause i.e. well-being of the entire mankind and animals.

>


> With regards,

>


> R.K. Joshi

Original Note from Viniyog Parivar
Delivered-To: esg@bgl.vsnl.net.in

X-Sender: viniyog@bom3.vsnl.net.in

From: VINIYOG PARIVAR TRUST

To: ESG-BANGLORE

Date: Mon, 19 Feb 2001 15:36:14 +0550

Subject: Earthquake update


Dear Friends,
Fifteen days after the earthquake, life is still haywire for many families in Kutch and Saurasuthra. 224 mild tremors of aftershocks are reported in last 15 days, continuing the reign of terror.
300 volunteers of Viniyog Parivar distributed and/or guided in distribution of over 1000 truck loads of food material at different places. This work was done in the first five days. Hunger is partially overcome. Affected people now need psychological rehabilitation. A team of five senior volunteers visited devastated villages and talked to the affected people, discussed their problems and considered how we can be helpful to them. Such 30 teams visited 994 villages in 10 talukas of Kutch district. A detailed report of all these 994 villages is published by "Gujarat Samachar", Ahmedabad.
Those who are interested, can reserve their copies. Those who are having internet facilities can visit the=20 site www.gujaratsamachar.com. Jain Sangh is also badly affected due to this earthquake. A large number of temples upashrayas, Gnan Bhandars, Pathshalas are also affected. A detailed report about the latest position of these is also prepared. Animals are worst affected. Animals have not died so much due to earthquake, but they are dying due to hunger because there is no one to take care of them.
Govt. figures put animal deaths at about 19000, but Viniyog's survey reveals that more than 40000 animals are dead due to hunger out of 110000 animals in Kutch. The unfortunate part is that due to drought conditions prevailing since last year there is no fodder available in the State. Govt. has brought 3 lakh tons of fodder through railway but there is no proper distribution channel.
Animal Welfare Board of India has taken this matter seriously and has arranged 1000 MT of wheat and 161 MT of rice for cattle feed from Food Corporation of India. AWBI Chairman Justice Gumanmalji Lodha has informed that he is much worried as animals are the lifeline of Kutch. Shri Lodhaji will be visiting Gujarat from 19th to 24th February and he will assess the situation and take decision for further assistance.
Viniyog has started sending trucks of dry fodder (Gawar chunni from Punjab) to affected areas with volunteers. One such truckload of fodder costs Rs.35000/-. Smt. Maneka Gandhi, Minister of State, Ministry of Social Justice & Empowerment, also holding charge of Animal Welfare, Govt. of India. has sanctioned grant for 15 truckloads of fodder from her Ministry, to be distributed through Viniyog Parivar Trust. Animal lovers worldwide are requested to help for fodder immediately.

A scheme for rehabilitation of quake affected people is under preparation.


Eco-friendly and economical houses with indigenous material will be constructedby Viniyog Parivar. The cost of each house will be approximately one lakh rupees. A detailed scheme will be placed before you shortly after the announcement of Gujarat Government's policy.
Please visit our website at "www.viniyog.org"

Thanks and regards,

Girish Shah

Viniyog Parivar



And to our inclusion in the last dispatch of an Appeal to the Gujarat Chief Minister against discriminatory Relief work, there was this response.

At 0949 AM 2/20/01 +0530, you wrote

THANKS FOR YOUR REGULAR FEED BACK EFFORTS. PERSONALLY I FEEL YOU WOULD HAVE BETTER CADIBILITY IF YOU COULD CONCENTRATE WITH A NEUTRAL VIEW TO REAL ACTIVE WORKERS IN THE FIELD AND AVOIUDE CIRCULATING LETTERS LIKE - ONE TO THE CM BY SOME OF " the concerned citizens"- COUPLE OF THEM EVEN EITHER NOT VISITED THE AREA OR HAD GONE ON AN FLYING VISIT AS AN EQ -CUM- EXPERTS!

PL. DO NOT TAKE IT IN OTHER WAY, THE NEED OF THE HOUR IS THE STRENGTHEN LOCAL INITIATIVES AND KEEP AWAY FROM "NAMES".

REGARDS

SHRIKANT



"Shrikant Joshi"

And our response:

Dear Mr. Joshi,
Thank you for your response. You will agree that the disaster in Gujarat, is perhaps the worst case scenario one can ever imagine. And that in such disaster all our differences should end, and as one people we must reach out to those affected. What religion, creed, colour, or class one came from before the disaster should not even be of the most remote consideration to the relief worker.... for all dead bodies rot when neglected, and all injured humans die when not cared for.
In such bleak circumstances, one would be appalled, repulsed, and shocked, if there were to be discrimination of any sort. Yet the reality is that there has been dicrimination. And the reports we have circulated are based on studies from well acknowledged authorities in disaster relief.... people who have years of disaster relief experience and authoratative publications to their credit.
Everything that is circulated is discussed amongst an interdiscipliary group.... and thus is not my opinion alone.
Apathetic response is condemnable. Discriminatory response even more.
Hope you will join us in ensuring that the rebuilding process in Gujarat is not defined along caste, community and class lines in this land of cultural diversity.
Regards
Leo Saldanha

Environment Support Group



7. Web Links:
A manual on earthquake proof housing from National Info Center for Earthquake Engineering is avaialable at

> http://www.nicee.org/NICEE/Guajrat/iaeemanual.htm



8. Appeal For Funds
DONATE MONEY, THE MOST EFFECTIVE RELIEF YOU CAN EXTEND TO THE AFFECTED. This will help NGOs working with the earthquake victims to procure supplies locally, and avoid the confusion presently hindering relief operations due to overburdening of infrastructure by material supply trucks.
To coordinate donations, the "Janpath Citizens Initiative / Janvikas / Kutch Navnirman Abhiyan", have set up a Separate Account with the Global Trust Bank.
You can make your contributions by way of Cheques / Demand Drafts / Direct Money Transfer favouring:

"Janvikas (EQ) A/c no. 2101016292".

Global Trust will accept contributions made to this account in all its branches across the country. Please note that several banks have waived the service fee for issuing Demand Drafts made to earthquake relief efforts.


You can drop the cheques/DDs in any of Global Trust Bank branches. The Bangalore Branches are in the following locations:


  1. 21/15, M. G. Road, Bangalore 560 001 Tel: 5596625

  2. 547, CMH Road, Indiranagar, Bangalore 560 038 Tel: 5284710

  3. 209/1, Bellary Road, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 079 Tel: 3446103

  4. 7/24, 11th Main, 4th Block, Jayanagar East, Bangalore 560 011. Tel: 6541431

If you have problems reaching the Global Trust Bank, you can send your Cheque/DD contributions to HID Forum or ESG, for which Janvikas receipts will be issued:




  • HID Forum, 3, Lavelle Mansions, 1/2, Lavelle Road, Bangalore 560 001. Tel: 2270762/2243762 Fax: 2243763 Email: hidforum@vsnl.com




  • Environment Support Group ®, S-3, Rajashree Apartments, 18/57, 1st Main Road, S. R. K. Gardens, Jayanagar, Bannerghatta Road, Bangalore 560 041. INDIA. Telefax: 91-80-6341977 Fax: 91-80-6723926 (PP)
    Email: esg@bgl.vsnl.net.in

Cash contributions are collected at HID Forum.


You may also send your contributions directly to Ahmedabad, but please remember that such Cheques/DDs may take several days to clear. These Cheques/DDs should also be drawn in favour of "Janvikas (EQ) a/c no. 2101016292" and mailed to:
Janvikas, 105-6 Royal Chinmay Apartments, Behind Simandhar Towers, Judges Bungalows Road, Ahmedabad 380 015. Tel: 91-79-6857745 Fax:91-79-6857443.

24 hour hotline: 6856685, 6857745, 6857443 Email: socjust@icenet.net or


jv-hidrc@icenet.net

(Swift Code: GTBKINBB021 - Global Trust Bank Limited, Bodakdev, Ahmedabad 380 015)


100% Income Tax Waiver for Donations:
Shri. R. K. Pathania, Member, Central Board of Direct Taxes, New Delhi, following a tour of the earthquake affected villages has declared that:
"Donations made on or before 30th June 2001, to Charitable Institutions already registered with the Income-Tax Department will be entitled for 100% deduction from taxable income of the donor." (Press Release of S. K. Gam, ITO (PR) For Chief Commissioner of Income Tax, Gujarat, Ahmedabad dated 31 January 2001 No. CC/ABD/PR/A62/2000-01
All contributions made to the aforementioned Janavikas account are thus eligible for this relief. Janvikas 80 (G) Registration No.: HQIII/33(151)/98-99 valid from 1.4.98 to 31.3.2001
In case of foreign donations make contribution to: JANVIKAS- A/c No: 9687; Bank of India, Panchwati Branch, Ahmedabad. SWIFT CODE NO.: BKIDINBBAAMB. Janvikas has the requisite clearance under the Foreign Contribution (Regulation) Act.
Online donations via credit cards can be made by logging onto www.icicicommunities.org, favouring Give Foundation, Money2India or Infinity Internet Banking.
OXFAM (India) account:
Contributions may also be made to "OXFAM India", for which 100% Tax relief is available under Sec 80 (G).
Oxfam (India), 'Vijaya Shree', 4th A Main, Off Bellary Road, Hebbal, Bangalore - 560 024.
Tel: 363 2964/363 3274 Fax: 363 1371 (Attn. Oxfam India). Email: oxfamindia@vsnl.com
SEWA Account
SEWA, another major organization in Gujarat (which has been doing great work, especially with marginalized women and children, and especially in the salt pan areas) is ready to receive direct financial contribution. Please check www.indya.com website or the address below for details:
Tel: 079-550-6444; 550-6477

Email: sewamahila@wiletonline.net

Website: www.sewa.org

9. Bangalore Response to Gujarat Earthquake Contact Details
Coordinating Groups:
Resource Coordination and Financial Contributions: HID Forum, 3, Lavelle Mansions, 1/2, Lavelle Road, Bangalore 560 001. Tel: 2270762/2243762 Fax: 2243763
Email: hidforum@vsnl.com or bangalore@sdc.net
Medical Relief Advisory: Community Health Cell, 367, "Srinivasa Nilaya", Jakkasandra, 1st Main, 1st Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034. Tel: 5531518/5525372
Email: sochara@blr.vsnl.net.in
Media and Financial Contributions: Oxfam (India), 'Vijaya Shree', 4th A Main, Off Bellary Road, Hebbal, Bangalore - 560 024. Tel: 363 2964/363 3274 Fax: 363 1371 (Attn. Oxfam India). Email: oxfamindia@vsnl.com
Food and Non-Medical Supplies (No more Clothes and Blankets Required): Voluntary Health Association of Karnataka, 60, Rajini Nilaya, 2nd Cross, Gurumurthy Street, Ramakrishna Mutt Road, Ulsoor, Bangalore 560 008. Tel: 5546606 Email: vhak@bgl.vsnl.net.in
Ashraya, Jawan's Quarters, BDA Park, Double Road, Indiranagar 1st Stg, Bangalore 38. Tel: 5251929 Fax: 5286195 ashchild@bgl.vsnl.net.in
Information Collation and Earthquake Update/Appeal Dissemination: Environment Support Group ®, S-3, Rajashree Apartments, 18/57, 1st Main Road, S. R. K. Gardens, Jayanagar, Bannerghatta Road, Bangalore 560 041. INDIA. Telefax: 91-80-6341977 Fax: 91-80-6723926 (PP) Email: esg@bgl.vsnl.net.in
On Behalf of:
"Janpath Citizens Initiative / Janvikas / Kutch Navnirman Abhiyan".

C/o Janvikas, 105-6 Royal Chinmay Apartments, Behind Simandhar Towers, Judges Bungalows Road, Ahmedabad 380 015.



Phones: +91 - 79 - 685 6685, 685 4248, 685 4475 (24-hour helpdesk)

Fax: +91 - 79 - 685 4473

Issue 11 ENDS

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