Department of health and human services



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Teenage Pregnancy Prevention (TPP):

Research and Demonstration Programs

and


Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP)

Funding Opportunity Announcement


and
Application Instructions

Office of Adolescent Health

Office of Public Health and Science
and
Administration on Children, Youth and Families

Administration for Children and Families


U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


2010

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Office of Public Health and Science, Office of Adolescent Health and Administration on Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Family and Youth Services Bureau
FUNDING OPPORTUNITY TITLE: Teenage Pregnancy Prevention: Research and Demonstration Programs (Tier 2) and Personal Responsibility Education Program
ANNOUNCEMENT TYPE: New Competitive Cooperative Agreement
FUNDING OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT (FOA) NUMBER: OPHS/OAH-TPP PREP Tier2-2010
CFDA NUMBER: 93.297 (TPP); CFDA number pending for PREP
DATES: To receive consideration, applications must be received by the Office of Grants Management, Office of Public Health and Science (OPHS), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) c/o Grant Application Center, 1515 Wilson Blvd., Suite 100, Arlington, VA 22209, no later than 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on June 8, 2010, for hard-copy applications and no later than 11:00 p.m. Eastern Time for electronic applications submitted via Grants.gov Website Portal or the GrantSolutions System on the same deadline date. A letter of intent is recommended and should be received no later than 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on May 10, 2010. The application due date requirement in this announcement supercedes the instructions in the application form. Please refer to the Submission Dates and Times section for the full application submission requirements.
Overview: Applicants will undergo a screening for completeness and responsiveness. Applications that pass this initial screening will then be evaluated through an objective review process. Each cooperative agreement will be funded under one of two funding streams being used to support the grants under this FOA. Successful applications will result in the award of an estimated 45 cooperative agreements. Award decisions for recipients are anticipated to be made in September 2010.


Funding

Available



Letters of Intent Due

Applications Due

Grants Awarded

$15 million to $25 million from TPP
$10 million from PREP

May 10, 2010

5:00 PM EST




Hard Copy

June 8, 2010

5:00 PM EST
Electronic submissions

June 8, 2010



11:00 PM EST
http://www.grants.gov


September 1, 2010



Executive Summary
The Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) and the Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF) announce the availability of Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 funds for competitive discretionary grants under two similar programs to support innovative youth pregnancy prevention strategies which are medically accurate and age appropriate. The OAH and ACYF have jointly developed this funding announcement. The two agencies intend to collaborate in soliciting and reviewing grant applications submitted in response to this FOA, and to collaborate in determining final funding decisions. This FOA sets forth a common set of requirements for applicants for both programs. This single application process has been developed to link the two programs which share a common goal and to help reduce the application burden on potential applicants by eliminating the need either to determine which program to apply for or to submit two applications.
Under this announcement, applicants can be considered for possible funding under two funding streams. Up to $25 million from the Teenage Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) program authorized in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 is available on a competitive basis for research and demonstration grants to develop, replicate, refine, and test additional model and innovative strategies for preventing teenage pregnancy. In addition, a total of $10 million is available on a competitive basis to implement and test innovative strategies utilizing funds available through the Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, 2010. OAH and ACYF will collaborate to make joint funding decisions based on the scores received from an objective review panel as well as other considerations described in Section V. Application Review Information. TPP notices of grant awards will be made by the OAH and those projects will be managed by OAH; PREP notices of grant awards will be made by ACYF and those projects will be managed by ACYF.
This announcement describes the grant application requirements and processes for both programs. Applicants may only submit one application under this FOA. Note that, applicants will be considered for both the TPP and PREP funding, if successful an award will only be made from one funding source. Applicants may choose to opt out of consideration for funding from a specific funding stream. Applications are encouraged from entities that currently have the capability to effectively implement and evaluate proposed program interventions. Awards in the form of cooperative agreements will be made for a project period of five years.
I. Funding Opportunity Description
Authority: The statutory authority for awards under this Funding Opportunity Announcement is contained in Division D, Title II of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 (Public Law 111-117) and Section 513(c)(1) of the Social Security Act (to be codified at 42 U.S.C. § 713(c)(1)) as enacted by Section 2953 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, 2010 (Public Law 111-148).
Background
The President’s budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 proposed a new Teenage Pregnancy Prevention initiative to address the high teen pregnancy rates by replicating evidence-based models and testing innovative strategies. On December 16, 2009, the President signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 (Public Law 111-117). Division D, Title II of the Act provides $110,000,000 for making competitive contracts and grants to public and private entities to fund medically accurate and age appropriate programs that reduce teenage pregnancy and for the Federal costs associated with administering and evaluating such contracts and grants. The statute states that of the funds made available, (a) not less than $75,000,000 shall be for funding the replication of programs that have been proven effective through rigorous evaluation to reduce teenage pregnancy, behavioral risk factors underlying teenage pregnancy, or other associated risk factors; and (b) not less than $25,000,000 shall be for funding research and demonstration grants to develop, replicate, refine, and test additional models and innovative strategies for preventing teenage pregnancy. Any remaining amounts are to be available for training and technical assistance, evaluation, outreach, and additional program support activities.
A separate competitive funding announcement is being issued by OAH to address the first component of the teenage pregnancy prevention initiative, replicating evidence-based program models (See FOA# OPHS/OAH-TPP Tier1-2010). This current funding announcement makes available approximately $15,000,000 to $25,000,000 for research and demonstration programs as part of the second component of the teenage pregnancy prevention initiative. A third funding announcement related to community-wide approaches to teenage pregnancy prevention may be released at a later date. This announcement may utilize up to $10 million of the $25,000,000 available for research and demonstration projects.
In the Conference Report (House Report 111-366) accompanying the Consolidated Appropriations Act, the conferees directed the Secretary to establish an Office of Adolescent Health (OAH), as authorized under section 1708 of the Public Health Service Act and as proposed in the Senate Report 111-66. (The Senate Report stated an expectation that the Secretary place this office within the Office of Public Health and Science, as authorized.) The conferees stated their intention that the OAH be responsible for implementing and administering the teenage pregnancy prevention program. The conferees also expressed an intention that the OAH coordinate its efforts with the Administration for Children and Families, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other appropriate HHS offices and operating divisions.
The President signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Public Law 111-148) on March 23, 2010. The Act authorizes the Secretary to award $10 million in grants to entities to implement innovative youth pregnancy prevention strategies and target services to high-risk, vulnerable, and culturally under-represented youth populations, including youth in foster care, homeless youth, youth with HIV/AIDS, pregnant and parenting women who are under 21 years of age and their partners, and youth residing in areas with high birth rates for youth. Entities awarded grants under this program are required to agree to participate in a rigorous Federal evaluation of its grant activities. Section 2953 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act authorizes the purpose of these programs to educate adolescents on both abstinence and contraception for the prevention of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.
A. Purpose and Approach
The purpose of this FOA is to support research and demonstration programs that will develop, replicate, refine, and test additional models and innovative strategies for preventing teenage pregnancy under the TPP program, and to implement innovative strategies for preventing teenage pregnancy and target services to identified populations under PREP. These populations include high-risk, vulnerable, and culturally under-represented youth populations, including youth in foster care, homeless youth, youth with HIV/AIDS, pregnant women or mothers who are under 21 years of age and their partners, and youth residing in areas with high birth rates for youth.
Funded projects are expected to generate lessons learned so others can benefit from these strategies and innovative approaches. Successful applicants will demonstrate that they can carefully document the intervention for possible replication by others, demonstrate the capacity to conduct a process and outcome evaluation, and plan for the dissemination of findings through various means, including but not limited to, publication of an article in a peer-reviewed journal. Funded projects are expected to address teenage pregnancy prevention and related risk behaviors in youth in communities with high need as demonstrated by high rates of teen birth or pregnancies or other associated sexual risk behaviors. Under this announcement, funds are available for projects operating in one or multiple sites with an emphasis on those interventions that target impacts on key sexual behavioral outcomes. This program aims to increase the capacity of communities to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions for dissemination and replication by others. Funded projects must show that the proposed intervention is (a) based on some preliminary evidence of effectiveness, (b) a significant adaptation of an evidence-based program, or (c) is a new and innovative approach to teenage pregnancy prevention. All adolescents shall be eligible to participate in program services without regard to race, ethnicity, or sexual identity.
1. Eligible Program Interventions
HHS is interested in applications that propose to study a broad range of approaches to teenage pregnancy prevention with a focus on program interventions that are most likely to demonstrate a change in sexual behaviors. This may include programs that are popular in the field, but may not have been rigorously evaluated. HHS is particularly interested in applications that propose to address gaps in the field of teenage pregnancy prevention including, but not limited to the following areas:


  • Evaluating programs that have some evidence of effectiveness (e.g., programs that had some evidence of impact, but are not included in the list of programs eligible for replication in FOA # OPHS/OAH TPP Tier1-2010).

  • Testing significant adaptations to an evidence-based program identified by the Department as eligible for Tier 1 Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Program funding. (The list of evidence-based programs that are eligible for replication funds are listed in Appendix A.) More detailed information about the evidence review process, the list of programs that were reviewed and those that meet the standard to be eligible for replication funding under Tier 1 can be found at: http://www.hhs.gov/ophs/oah.

    • Significant Adaptations are changes to program or curriculum activities that alter one or more core components of the program. Applicants should review the underlying behavioral and health education theory of the intervention when proposing these types of changes. Such changes are sought in applications under this announcement. Examples include changing sequence of activities; adding activities; adding activities to address additional risk and protective factors; replacing videos; modifying condom activities; using other models/tools that cover same ground (e.g., decision making).

    • Minor Adaptations are changes to program or curriculum activities to better fit the age, culture, and context of the priority population. These changes are allowable under a separate competitive funding announcement issued by OAH to address the first component of the teenage pregnancy prevention initiative, replicating evidence-based program models (See FOA# OPHS/OAH-TPP Tier1-2010) and should not be submitted for consideration under this announcement. Examples of minor adaptations include: replacing videos (with other videos or activities); updating data/statistics; tailoring learning activities and instructional methods to youth –culture development; making activities more interactive; and customizing role-play (e.g., names).

    • Other adaptations such as deleting one or more core components of a program or adding core components may be considered new or innovative strategies, not an adaptation of an existing model. Such applications may be submitted under this announcement.

(The above guidelines are adapted from “Promoting Science-Based Approaches: Adaptation Guidelines,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of Reproductive Health (DRH) in collaboration with Education Training and Research Associates (ETR), April 1, 2010.)



  • Testing innovative programs for 18-19 year olds, who have the highest rate of births among teens.

  • Testing program approaches for priority populations, including but not limited to high-risk, vulnerable and culturally under-represented youth populations, immigrants, Hispanic, African American, or American Indian teenagers, those in foster care or in the adjudication system, males, runaway/homeless teenagers, out of school youth, youth with HIV/AIDS, and youth residing in areas with high birthrates for youth.

  • Programs that seek to reduce repeat-pregnancies and target pregnant and parenting women under the age of 21 and their partners. (PREP)

  • Studying other innovative program models, including the use of new social media.

Applicants should describe the proposed intervention in detail, including the relevant research evidence, and establish logic models and frameworks that link program elements to intended outcomes. Applicants should describe a strong theory of change framework and tie this framework to specific and detailed program activities, which are then linked to expected goals and sexual behavioral outcomes. Successful applicants will describe how the proposed program intervention will ensure that program elements are linked to the intended behavioral outcomes.


2. Potential to Demonstrate Evidence
HHS is interested in applications that clearly explain the potential to demonstrate evidence and which could eventually be replicated. Successful applicants will document an intervention with sufficient detail that it could be rigorously evaluated for possible future replication and dissemination. This includes:


    • identifying the evidence or research base for the proposed intervention;

    • documenting a new intervention in a logic model and identifying core components (when such components are known);

    • documenting significant adaptations if testing modifications to an existing evidence-based model;

    • documenting the program/curriculum in a manual, including staff training materials;

    • documenting any changes made for quality improvement based on piloting;

    • documenting any adjustments made throughout the program implementation period; and

    • including a plan for the development and dissemination of the intervention findings, including publication in a peer-reviewed publication.

All applicants will be expected to:




    • Describe a detailed implementation plan.

    • Develop a manual that outlines curriculum or intervention instruction and delivery during the funded grant period.

  • Monitor and document ongoing program implementation to facilitate potential future replication.

  • Provide evidence in Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) stating that all partners (e.g., schools, community-based organizations, others) have agreed to implement the program as designed and/or adapted.



3. Scale and Range of Programs

HHS intends to fund a broad range of program models. Having multiple funding ranges allows a wide array of programs to be funded, by a diverse set of grantees that have varying capacity to implement large-scale or smaller scale projects. Applicants may only apply for one funding range under this announcement. If an applicant applies to more than one funding range, all applications submitted by that applicant will be considered non-responsive and will not be entered into the review. The applicant will be notified that the application did not meet the eligibility requirements. HHS encourages applications in two broad funding ranges dependent on the scope of the program being proposed:




  • Range A: $400,000 to $600,000 per year

  • Range B: $600,000 to $1,000,000 per year


4. Target Population(s)
The target population for TPP funded projects is youth ages 10-19 years at program entry. The target population for PREP funded projects is youth ages 10-19 and pregnant women and mothers under age 21 and their partners. In addition, PREP funded projects should target high-risk, vulnerable and culturally under-represented youth populations, including immigrants, Hispanic, African American, or American Indian teenagers, those in foster care or in the adjudication system, males, runaway/homeless teenagers, out of school youth, youth with HIV/AIDS, and youth residing in areas with high birthrates for youth. Individuals who are not yet teenagers, including those under age 10, may participate in the TPP projects since many programs include pre-teens as a target audience for program interventions. Applicants are encouraged to serve specific priority populations as long as there is a sound rationale with supportive statistical data provided. Identifying target or priority populations permits a variety of developmentally- and age-appropriate interventions to be replicated or tested. Applicants should clearly define the target population by age groups (e.g., 10-14; 15-17; 18-19) and priority populations when appropriate (e.g., those in foster care, homeless teenagers, rural settings, immigrants, school-based populations, racial or ethnic groups, and pregnant and parenting women up to age 21, etc.) within geographic areas with high teen birth rates. Geographic areas to be served should be based on high teen birth rates since these data are more current and available than teen pregnancy rates. Statistical data on other correlating variables may be used to substantiate the need to serve specific priority populations. For example, immigrant, Latino and Native American teens have high teen birth rates within pockets of the U.S. Additionally, older adolescents, 18-19 years old, account for most teen pregnancies and are the most underserved in programs.
5. Medical Accuracy and Age Appropriateness
Programs funded under this announcement need to ensure that information provided is age appropriate, and scientifically and medically accurate. Successful applicants will be required to submit all core curriculum and related educational materials to the OAH or ACYF, as applicable, for review and approval prior to use in the project. Review and approval of core curriculum materials will be conducted after an application is approved for funding. While the applicant should identify the core curriculum proposed for use in the project, actual materials should not be submitted with the grant application. The review and approval process will occur during the planning phase of the first grant year (see below). The review shall ensure that the materials are medically accurate and up-to-date. All funded grantees must receive approval of curricula materials prior to use in the fully implemented project. Grantees will be notified of areas within curricula that need to be changed, updated, or corrected. The curricula materials may not be used until the curricula are approved by OAH or ACYF. Applicants should budget for staff training on medical accuracy and document the use of appropriate sources (e.g., CDC, NIH, and peer reviewed journals) of information if developing supplemental materials on abstinence, contraceptives, STIs and/or HIV. Applicants should explain how the program is age appropriate to the population being served.
The term “age-appropriate”, with respect to the information related to pregnancy prevention, means topics, messages, and teaching methods suitable to particular ages or age groups of children and adolescents, based on developing cognitive, emotional, and behavioral capacity typical for the age or age group.
The term “medically accurate and complete” means verified or supported by the weight of research conducted in compliance with accepted scientific methods; and published in peer-reviewed journals, where applicable or comprising information that leading professional organizations and agencies with relevant expertise in the field recognize as accurate, objective, and complete.
6. Phased-In Implementation Period
During the first six to 12 months of the first grant year, funded recipients will engage in a planning, piloting and readiness period. Continued funding is contingent on satisfactory progress and continued availability of funds. This period is devoted to hiring, training, conducting needs assessments, piloting the program, and otherwise ensuring readiness for full implementation. This first year planning period will ensure grantees are prepared to begin full implementation, are using medically accurate information, and have prepared procedures for evaluation of the program implementation and outcome/impacts, and other key tasks before OAH or ACYF, as applicable, provides approval for full-scale implementation. This period may be shorter for grantees that demonstrate readiness in less than 12 months. The duration of the planning period is contingent upon each grantee’s demonstrated readiness. The planning period is designed to assist funded projects to do the following activities:


  • Continue to Assess Needs and Resources: Applicants are expected to justify needs based on data in their application. The planning period provides additional time for grantees to continue summarizing or conducting a needs and resources assessment of their target population using new or existing data sources as appropriate; identify the specific youth to be targeted; identify resources and partners and use this information to inform program goals and objectives.

  • Finalize Goals & Objectives/Logic Model: Applicants are expected to propose goals, objectives, and a logic model in their application, describing the behaviors and determinants (risk factors) they plan to change with the programming. The planning period will enable OAH or ACYF, as applicable, and funded entities to refine and finalize goals, objectives, and the logic model, using additional needs assessment information.

  • Assess Program Fit: Applicants are expected to assess how well the proposed intervention fits with the site(s) selected for implementation. The planning period is an opportunity for reassessment after piloting the program to confirm appropriateness of the intervention to the implementation site(s).

  • Build Organizational Capacity: Applicants are expected to describe their organizational capacity to implement proposed program(s) models to identify additional capacity needs or other resources needed to implement successfully and to obtain necessary capacities. Successful applicants will need to demonstrate past experience in implementing teen pregnancy prevention programs. During the planning period, grantees will have an opportunity to provide training for staff who delivers the proposed program model(s).

  • Finalize Implementation Plans: Funded recipients have the opportunity to finalize program implementation plans; solidify evaluation plans and procedures that include both process and outcomes; have materials reviewed for medical accuracy; and engage partners in program implementation, as necessary.

  • Pilot Program Implementation: During the planning period, funded recipients are expected to pilot the program and evaluate procedures prior to full-scale implementation so that quality improvements or serious implementation challenges can be identified and resolved in a timely manner. This period will also be used to test data collection instruments, assess program fit and to ensure that system processes (e.g., data collection) are operational.



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