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7-06

4 October 2006


FINAL ASSESSMENT REPORT


PROPOSAL P295

Consideration of Mandatory Fortification with Folic Acid

For Information on matters relating to this Report or the assessment process generally, please refer to http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/standardsdevelopment/


Executive Summary

In May 2004, the Australia and New Zealand Food Regulation Ministerial Council (the Ministerial Council) asked Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) to investigate mandatory fortification with folic acid as a possible means of reducing the incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs) which are serious birth defects.


FSANZ released an Initial Assessment Report in October 2004 and presented four options, namely: maintenance of the status quo; extension of permissions for voluntary folic acid fortification; mandatory folic acid fortification; and increased health promotion and education strategies to increase folate intakes.
FSANZ reduced the number of regulatory options considered at Draft Assessment to maintenance of the status quo and mandatory folic acid fortification. FSANZ’s assessment seeks to determine how mandatory fortification can be implemented in Australia and New Zealand as Ministerial advice received in 2005 is that mandatory folic acid fortification is an effective strategy and requested that FSANZ expedite its process.
Internationally, a number of countries have reported successful mandatory folic acid fortification programs as an equitable and sustainable means of increasing the folic acid intake of women of child-bearing age (the target population) to reduce the incidence of NTDs.
FSANZ drew on this international experience and selected bread-making flour (consumed as bread and bread products) as the food vehicle for mandatory folic acid fortification in Australia and New Zealand at Draft Assessment. Following further targeted consultation and consideration of the international experience with folic acid fortification and Australian experience with thiamin fortification, FSANZ has refined the approach to specifically require mandatory fortification of bread as the final food consumed. This approach provides a more predictable means of delivering folic acid intake to the target population whilst limiting intake in the non-target population and increases flexibility for industry in meeting the mandatory standard.
This Final Assessment Report therefore focuses on consideration of mandatory folic acid fortification of bread as a means of reducing the incidence of NTDs in Australia and New Zealand and includes:


  • an assessment of the potential health benefits and risks of increased dietary intakes of folic acid by the Australian and New Zealand populations;




  • technical issues regarding fortification of bread as the preferred food vehicle and level of folic acid concentration to achieve the desired health outcome;




  • consideration of alternative approaches to mandatory fortification (as provided by several submitters) to achieve similar levels of effectiveness and safety;




  • management of any identified health risks associated with the selected level of fortification;







  • monitoring and implementation issues; and




  • presentation of a regulatory approach.

This report also addresses issues arising from public submissions and targeted stakeholder consultations.


The Decision
Mandatory fortification of bread1 with folic acid is the preferred approach in Australia and New Zealand to further reduce the incidence of NTDs.
The proposed level of mandatory fortification is 80-180 micrograms (µg) of folic acid per
100 grams of bread.
The approach maintains current voluntary folic acid permissions except for bread which will be changed from a voluntary permission to a mandatory requirement.

Reasons for the Decision
The reasons for this decision are:


  • fortifying bread with folic acid, learns from and builds on international experience of mandatory fortification to reduce the incidence of NTDs;







  • bread and bread products are staple foods consumed widely (more than 80%), consistently and regularly by the target population of women aged 16-44 years;




  • fortification of bread will deliver a mean increase in folic acid intake in the target population of 101 µg and 140 µg in Australia and New Zealand respectively, resulting in an estimated reduction of between 14-49 out of 300-350 pregnancies in Australia and 4-14 out of 70-75 pregnancies in New Zealand affected by an NTD each year;




  • on the available evidence, including overseas experience with mandatory fortification, the proposed level of fortification does not pose a risk to public health and safety. The level has been set to minimise any potential health risks as a degree of uncertainty exists, particularly for the non-target population from increased folic acid intakes over the longer term;




  • the cost-benefit analysis has indicated that mandatory fortification of bread with folic acid can deliver benefits that definitively exceed the costs:

  • in Australia, when folic acid is added to bread making flour, the net-benefit from all NTDs avoided is $122 million each year ongoing. In the case of live births the net-benefit is $21 million each year ongoing;

  • in Australia, when folic acid is added at the later stages of bread production, the net-benefit from all NTDs avoided is $99 million each year ongoing. In the case of live births there is a net-cost of $2 million each year ongoing;

  • in New Zealand, when folic acid is added to bread making flour, the net-benefit from all NTDs avoided is $41 million each year ongoing. In the case of live births the net-benefit is $4.3 million each year ongoing; and

  • in New Zealand, when folic acid is added at the later stages of bread production, the net-benefit from all NTDs avoided is $39 million each year ongoing. In the case of live births the net-benefit is $2.5 million each year ongoing.




  • fortification of bread provides greater predictability in the level of folic acid consumed by the target and non-target groups and therefore greater confidence that the estimated reduction in NTDs will be achieved and that health risks to non-target groups will be minimised;




  • fortification of bread provides flexibility for industry in determining the most appropriate and cost effective means of achieving mandatory fortification;



  • the cost to consumers is likely to be less than 2% of the price of a loaf of bread;







  • it is consistent with Ministerial policy guidance on mandatory fortification.



Consultation

FSANZ received 148 submissions in response to the Draft Assessment Report for this Proposal during the public consultation period of 3 to 31 July 2006. A full summary of submissions is at Attachment 2.


FSANZ also conducted intensive targeted consultation through a range of consultative mechanisms to discuss key issues and impacts of mandatory fortification with all stakeholder groups, namely the Australian and New Zealand baking and milling industries, supermarket in-store bakery representatives, organic industry representatives, government agencies, and consumer and public health organisations.
There was divergence of views regarding mandatory folic acid fortification both between and within stakeholder groups. Most government submitters supported mandatory fortification on the condition that monitoring is in place prior to implementation. Some public health and consumers groups supported mandatory fortification whereas others were opposed. Industry was opposed to mandatory fortification.
Key issues raised included the effectiveness of mandatory fortification in reducing NTDs (based on the proposed fortification level) being not sufficient to justify population wide consumption of folic acid, possible health risks and future unknown health risks, lack of consumer choice, the impacts on industry, monitoring of mandatory fortification, enforcement and the importance of continuing other NTD risk reduction strategies.



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