Cyi-07-Science (2017)



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CYI-07-Science (2017)


Plan Overview:

Plan Overview: Institute Goal Statement

Michigan State University Extension’s Children and Youth Institute helps children, youth and adults who support them thrive and contribute in a complex and changing world.

 

Institute-Wide Outcomes



As a result of participation in programming and educational activities offered by MSU Extension Children and Youth Institute staff, the following long-term outcomes will be achieved.

  1. Children and youth are equipped to be successful lifelong learners and are socially, emotionally and physically healthy and safe.

  2. Adults build life skills and assets in children and youth.

 

Long Term Indicators



  • Children and youth demonstrate readiness for and engagement in lifelong learning.

  • Children and youth develop and apply life skills.

  • Youth and adults are civically-engaged and active in their communities.

  • Youth are workforce ready and financially literate.

  • Youth and adults possess global and cultural competencies.

  • Adults understand how and are committed to helping children and youth develop assets and life skills.



Inputs

Outputs

Learning Outcomes

Action Outcomes


CYI-07-Science:

CYI-07-L1: Youth increase science knowledge and learn problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making life skills.

  • 0 -

CYI-07-L1-I1: # of youth participating in programs who report an increase in science knowledge, problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making skills.

  • 0 -

CYI-07-L1-I2: # of youth indicating the ability to apply science knowledge and problem solving, critical thinking, and decision-making life skills.


CYI-07-A1: Youth apply science knowledge and problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making life skills.

  • 0 -

CYI-07-A1-I1: # of youth that apply science knowledge and problem solving, critical thinking, and decision-making life skills.


  • 0 - CYI-05-O2: Science literacy presentations at conferences, workshops, and other educational events for adults and teen leaders working with youth.

CYI-07-L2: Adults and teen leaders gain knowledge and skills to engage youth in science through an experiential, inquiry based learning process.

  • 0 -

CYI-07-L2-I1: # of adults and teen leaders who increase knowledge and skills in science content areas.

  • 0 -

CYI-07-L2-I2: # of adults and teen leaders who indicate increased confidence in their ability to engage youth in experiential, inquiry based science learning.

  • 0 -

CYI-07-L2-I3: # of adults and teen leaders indicating the ability to apply knowledge to engage youth in experiential, inquiry based science learning.


CYI-07-A2: Adults and teen leaders apply knowledge to engage youth in experiential, inquiry based science learning.

  • 0 -

CYI-07-A2-I1: # of adults and teen leaders that apply knowledge to engage youth in experiential, inquiry based science learning.


  • 0 - CYI-05-O3: Science literacy presentations at conferences, workshops, and other educational events for adults working with youth.

CYI-07-L3: Adults gain knowledge and skills to engage youth in science through an experiential, inquiry based learning process.

  • 0 -

CYI-07-L3-I1: # of adults who increase knowledge and skills in science content areas.

  • 0 -

CYI-07-L3-I2: # adults who indicate increased confidence in their ability to engage youth in experiential, inquiry-based science learning.





Outputs without related indicators

  • 0 - CYI-05-O4: Community outreach and awareness displays and exhibits which increase awareness and understanding of the importance of science literacy.






Situation:

Science Team has both short term and long term advantages for children, youth, adults, communities, and the economy and the implications for programming begin at birth.

Description of challenge, problem, or opportunity (Science Logic Model - 2010):



  • Unsolved worldwide social problems need to be addressed by science;

  • In the US, shortage of scientists & people understanding science;

  • Underrepresentation of women and minorities in science careers;

  • Need a diverse pool of trained scientists to frame and solve problems & educate others; and

  • General population in the US (& worldwide) lacks basic understanding of science methods and content (“science literacy”).

 

Key business leaders in the United States, report that in order for students to succeed in 21st century America they will need a set of skills that have both similarities and differences to the needs of previous generations.  To succeed in the 21st century individuals must be (Nidds & McGerald, 1996):



  • able to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information;

  • able to effectively communicate with others;

  • proficient in science, mathematics, computer/technical skills, foreign languages as well as history, geography, and global awareness;

  • capable of collaboratively working in culturally diverse settings;

  • leaders who see projects through to completion;

  • responsible decision makers who are self-motivated and active political participants; and

  • ethical individuals who are committed to their families, communities, and colleagues. 

Additional research indicates that people who are academically successful:

  • experience more stability in their employment;

  • increase their likelihood of having health insurance;

  • are less dependent on public assistance and less likely to engage in criminal activity;

  • are more active as citizens and community volunteers;  and

  • are likely to lead healthier lives.   (National Alliance of Business, In., 1998)

 

Science, engineering, technology and applied mathematics (STEM) literacy are especially necessary for productive work in the 21st century economy (Kane, Berryman, Goslen, and Meltzer, 1993).  This is particularly true in Michigan as we endure a paradigm shift and embrace green innovation and businesses and prepare children and youth for the knowledge, skills, and careers that will be needed to lead us forward.  Within 4-H programming, the STEM emphasis represents a broad range of disciplines (animal science, plant science, environmental and earth sciences, bioenergy, engineering and technology) built upon hands on learning and inquiry.  

 

Research is currently evaluating the impact of science experiences for adolescents on the likelihood that they will graduate from high school with science degrees and pursue careers in science.  Recent studies lead some researchers to believe that the interest and exposure of youth to science is a likely factor leading to increased science enrollment in high school.  Furthermore, these researchers recommend a more experiential, inquiry based approach where students investigate real-world science problems relevant to their daily lives (Tai et al. 2006; Maltese & Tai, 2011).  Since MSUE 4-H programs embody experiential, inquiry based science learning, Michigan State University Extension believes 4-H is uniquely positioned to equip youth with the science knowledge and skills to regenerate the Michigan workforce.



It is apparent that Michigan State University Extension can promote academic success by exposing youth to a variety of science experiences designed to enhance their science literacy. As a result of involvement in programs provided by Michigan State University Children & Youth Institute’s Science team, Michigan children and youth will demonstrate readiness for and engagement in K-12 education and possess the skills needed to be successful lifelong learners and ultimately a diverse population will be prepared to thrive and contribute in a complex and changing world.

Diversity and Civil Rights Efforts:



Michigan State University is an affirmative-action, equal opportunity employer.  Michigan State University Extension programs and materials are open to all without regard to race, color, national origin, gender, gender identity, religion, age, height, weight, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, marital status, family status or veteran status.  The Science Work Group will uphold these policies in the following ways:

  • Workshops, activities, and training programs will be held at times and in places designed to minimize barriers for diverse audiences;

  • Provide educational training to isolated rural families in one-on-one settings when appropriate;

  • Scholarships will be offered when appropriate to help reduce participation barriers for limited resource children and adults;

  • Presentations and printed materials will be designed to demonstrate cultural sensitivity;

  • Graphic identifiers will be gender and race neutral;

  • Documentation of promotional efforts for programs;

  • Include civil rights posters at events and meetings and incorporating the civil rights slide into presentations;

  • Include civil rights guidelines in the creation of all materials/guidelines/ guiding principles

  • Artwork used in printed materials will represent a multicultural perspective; and

  • Using MSUE Programs & resources to reaching targeted underserved audiences.

Deliverables:

  1. 1.      Science Lessons

  • Timeframe:  Ongoing throughout the year

  • Delivery methods: The lessons will be accessible for free on the Michigan 4-H website: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/resources/4_h_animal_science_anywhere, http://msue.anr.msu.edu/program/info/science_blast. The lessons can be utilized in any environment.  Promotion of these resources will occur at outreach events such as MSU Tollgate Farm and Education Center, 4-H events with sports teams, MSU Science Festival, 4-H Exploration Days, NYSD events, Animal and Science 4-H Teen and Adult Leader Workshops.  Social media along with MI 4-H Today, MSUE news and CYI news articles are also venues that will be used to promote these resources.

  • Output:  Science workshops/events for youth & adults.

?       A total of 8 new lessons will be developed that will reach 500 adults and 2000 youth annually.

  1. Farm based science curriculum

  2. Animal Science Anywhere lessons

  3. Science Blast in the Class lessons

  4. Children's Garden curriculum

  5. Diddley-Squat lessons

  6. Cloverbud Animal Science lessons

  • Audience:  All adults who work with youth (K-12 teachers, volunteers, day care providers, 4-H staff, teen leaders, homeschool parents etc.).

  • Outcome:  1) Youth increase science knowledge and learn problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making life skills and 2) Adults gain knowledge and skills to engage youth in science through an experiential, inquiry based process.

  • Indicators: 1) # of adults who increase knowledge and skills in science content areas; 2) # adults who indicate increased confidence in their ability to engage youth in experiential, inquiry-based science learning; and 3) # of youth participating in programs who report an increase science knowledge, problem solving, critical thinking and decision making skills.

 

 Major Tasks/Activities

2017

2018

2019

Farm Based Science

  • Educator PD

  • Collaborative curriculum development one grade

 

Farm Based Science

  • Educator PD

  • Collaborative curriculum development of another grade

  • collaborative development of in school coordinating activities with 2017 grade activities

  • Evaluate 2017 grade and modify as needed

Farm Based Science

  • Educator PD

  • Collaborative curriculum development of another grade

  • collaborative development of in school coordinating activities with 2017, 2018 grade activities

  • Evaluate 2017, 2018 grade and modify as needed

  • Extend learning to community

Animal Science Anywhere

  • Finalize connecting all existing lessons to Next Generation Science Practices (NGSP)

  • Create 3 new lessons

Animal Science Anywhere

  • Work with Tollgate Farm and Education Center to determine future lesson priorities

  • Create 3 new lessons

Animal Science Anywhere

  • Create 3 new lessons

  • Review existing lessons to determine if any updates are needed

Science Blast in the Class

Science Blast in the Class

  • Create 4 new lessons

  • Provide training for staff and volunteers

  • evaluate and edit

Science Blast in the Class

  • Create 4 new lessons

  • Provide trainings for staff and volunteers

  • evaluate and edit

Children’s Garden

  • Educator PD

  • Finalize connecting all existing lessons to Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)

  • Evaluate, revise and Modify curriculum as needed

Children’s Garden

  • Educator PD

  • Create 2 new lessons with digital technology integrated

  • Evaluate, revise and Modify curriculum as needed

 

Children’s Garden

  • Educator PD

  • Create 2 new lessons with digital technology integrated

  • Evaluate, revise and Modify curriculum as needed

 

Diddley-Squat

  • One new activity per quarter

  • Develop a plan with ANR communications for moving forward

 

Diddley-Squat

  • One new activity per quarter

  • Continue working with ANR communications for moving forward

  • Evaluate  previous and modify as needed

 

Diddley-Squat

  • One new activity per quarter

  • Continue working with ANR communications for moving forward

  • Evaluate  previous and modify as needed

Cloverbud Animal Science Lessons

  • Create one new lesson per quarter

Cloverbud Animal Science Lessons

  • Create one new lesson per quarter

  • Provide staff/volunteer training and marketing as needed

Cloverbud Animal Science Lessons

  • Create one new lesson per quarter

  • Evaluate and modify as necessary

 

  1. 2.      Science Curricula & Resources

  • Timeframe: Ongoing throughout the year

  • Delivery methods: Curricula and resources will be either sold or uploaded on the Michigan 4-H Website and downloaded for free.  Promotion of these resources will occur upon completion and could be present at outreach events such as MSU Tollgate Education Center, 4-H events with sports teams, MSU Science Festival, 4-H Exploration Days, other events occurring throughout the state.  MI 4-H Today, CYI news articles, MSUE news, social media, and emails to program coordinators and staff will also be used to promote these resources.

  • Output: Science trainings for youth and adults that work with youth

?       The new resources will be developed that will reach 2000 youth, 4-H volunteers and adults working with young people annually.

  1. The Biosecurity Education certification program will be taught to youth by approximately 50 certified Michigan Advisors and delivered to 600 4-H youth in animal science projects.

  2. Forestry Camp Instructor and student guides

  3. Animal Care and Well-Being

  4. Youth Pork Quality Assurance (PQA) Michigan resources

  5. Michigan 4-H Poultry Showmanship Guide (revision)

  6. Michigan 4-H Cavy Showmanship Guide (revision)

  7. Michigan 4-H Dairy Goat Judging Manual (revision)

  • Audience: 4-H youth are the primary audience but all 4-H volunteers and other adults who work with youth will benefit from these resources.

  • Outcomes: Youth increase science knowledge and learn problem solving, critical thinking and decision making life skills.

  • Indicators: 1) # of youth participating in programs who report an increase in science knowledge, problem solving, critical thinking and decision making life skills.

 

Major Tasks/Activities

2017

2018

2019

Biosecurity Education

  • Create new curriculum for Michigan 4-H  based off of the University of California Davis curriculum

Biosecurity Education

  • Promote and certify 50 4-H volunteers with the new curriculum

  • Begin process of training youth

Biosecurity Education

  • Assist certified instructors in running program

  • Increase youth reach and adults certified

Forestry Camp

  • Review evaluations from second pilot and make modifications to the camp, evaluations and guides as needed 

  • Begin exploring ideas for a state forestry competition

Forestry Camp

  • Pilot camp on a larger scale with the first facilitator trainings.  Make revisions based on the feedback and evaluations

  • Seek funding to provide a large scale facilitator training for 2019

  • Continue working on a state forestry competition with the goal of sending a team to the national invitational

  • Develop a plan with ANR communications for student and instructor guides

Forestry Camp

  • If funding is obtained plan multiple facilitator trainings

  • Continue working with ANR com on guides.

  • Host a state forestry competition and send a team to the 4-H  National Forestry Invitational

Animal Care and Well-Being

  • Write, review, edit print, and distribute a 4-H Animal Care & Well-Being bulletin

Animal Care and Well-Being

  • Write, edit, and publish activities to for youth and volunteers to better understand, teach and discuss animal care and well-being.

  • Write, edit, film, and publish short video clips of Michigan youth talking about what animal care and well-being is, why it is important, and how they working to create positive states of welfare for their animals every day.

Animal Care and Well-Being

  • Continue to evaluate current resources and determine what other items need to be developed to increase education for staff, youth, and volunteers on this topic.

Youth PQA

  • Revised Michigan Youth PQA resources to be used in 2017

  • Research uses and application of new multi-species quality assurance program

Youth PQA

  • Assist in transition and negotiations of utilizing the new multi-species quality assurance program

  • Troubleshoot concerns and costs with new program

Youth PQA

  • Fully transition Michigan over to the National Youth Multi-Species Quality Assurance Program

 

 


  1. 3.      Science Workshops, Expos, and Events for Youth

  • Timeframe: Ongoing throughout the year

  • Delivery methods: Educational workshops, expos, shows, demonstrations and events organized and promoted by county, district, regional, and/or state staff that target science education and mastery.  Events will be face to face.             

  • Output: Science workshops/events for youth.

?       60 events that reach 6500 youth and 650 adults annually

  1. 4-H Animal and Veterinary Science Camp

  2. Renewable energy

  3. Forestry Camp

  4. Great Lakes & Natural Resources Camp

  5. Tollgate

  6. KBS Camp

  7. 4-H Exploration days

  8. County based 4-H science events

  9. Judging Contests

  10. Competitions

  11. Great Lakes Education Program

  12. Stepping Stones Outdoor Education Program

  13. 4-H Companion Animal Camp

  • Audience: All youth aged 5 to 19.

  • Outcomes: Youth increase science knowledge and learn problem solving, critical thinking and decision making life skills.  

  • Indicators: 1) # of youth participating in programs who report an increase in science knowledge, problem solving, critical thinking and decision making life skills.

 

 


Major Tasks/Activities

2017

2018

2019

Needs assessment, while existing programs continue

Redesign, develop programs as informed by the needs assessment

Evaluate and modify programs as needed

 


  1. 4.      Science Trainings for Adults Working with Youth

  • Timeframe: Ongoing throughout the year

  • Delivery methods: Educational trainings and workshops organized and promoted by county, district, regional, and/or state staff that target science education.  Trainings will primarily be face to face.            

  • Output: Science trainings for adults and teen leaders.

?       15 trainings that reach 400 adults annually

  1. Children’s Garden

  2. Camp staff

  3. Farm based

  4. Industry and partner organization trainings

  • Audience: 4-H volunteers who work with youth will benefit from these resources.

  • Outcomes: Adults and teen leaders gain knowledge and skills to engage youth in science through an experiential, inquiry based learning process.

  • Indicators: 1) # of adult and teen leaders who increase knowledge and skills in science content areas and 2) # adults and teen leaders who indicate increased confidence in their ability to engage youth in experiential, inquiry-based science learning.

 

Major Tasks/Activities

2017

2018

2019

Needs assessment, while existing programs continue

Redesign, develop programs as informed by the needs assessment

Evaluate and modify programs as needed

 

  1. 5.      Science Trainings for Adults  and Teen Leaders Working with Youth

  • Timeframe: Ongoing throughout the year

  • Delivery methods: Educational trainings and workshops organized and promoted by county, district, regional, and/or state staff that target science education.  Trainings will primarily be face to face.            

  • Output: Science trainings for adults and teen leaders.

?       6 trainings that reach 275 adults 300 youth

  1. Teen and Adult Leaders Trainings at Kettunen Center and other facilities

  2. Camp staff

  3. Outdoor education

  • Audience: 4-H volunteers who work with youth will benefit from these resources.

  • Outcomes: Adults and teen leaders gain knowledge and skills to engage youth in science through an experiential, inquiry based learning process.

  • Indicators: 1) # of adult and teen leaders who increase knowledge and skills in science content areas and 2) # adults and teen leaders who indicate increased confidence in their ability to engage youth in experiential, inquiry-based science learning.

 

  1. 6.      Community Outreach and Awareness of MSUE Science Education

  • Timeframe: Ongoing throughout the year, including MSU Science Festival in April, and events at MSU Tollgate Education Center.

  • Delivery methods: Work with local community partners to offer displays and exhibits at existing events.  Engage the public in hands-on demonstrations of science projects, activities and programs.

  • Output: Community Outreach and Awareness of Science Education.

?       50 events/communication that reach a large audience (over 20,000 annually)

  1. MSU Festival

  2. Local Science Events

  3. 4-H Garden summer program

  4. Butterfly programs

  5. WKAR partnership

  6. Digital Badges

  7. News articles

  8. National Youth 4-H Science Day

  • Audience:  General public and those involved with science education.

  • Outcomes: Community partners, educators, and families are aware of 4-H resources available to improve science literacy for youth.

  • Indicators: # of community partners, educators, and families that are aware of MSUE 4-H science resources and opportunities for youth.

 

 

Efforts that involve partnerships with other Work Teams, Institutes and Departments

 

Great Lakes Stewardship Initiative - Water Quality Investigations



  • Collaborating Partners:  Sea Grant, Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, US Fish & Wildlife, NEMIGLSI Network, Discovering Place, Flint River Watershed Coalition, SEMIS, GMI

  • Timeframe:  Ongoing throughout the year

  • Role: In Partnership with the Great Lakes Stewardship Initiative, serve as a science educator with youth and adults monitor various part of the Great Lakes watershed supporting and modeling good science practices strengthening science literacy.

  • Delivery methods: Face-to-face trainings; Hands-on train-the-trainer sessions.

  • Output: Science literacy workshops, events, activities and educational contests for youth.

    • 42 field visits that reach 2700 youth and 140 adults

  • Audience: Youth ages 5 through 19.

  • Outcomes: Youth increase science knowledge and learn problem solving, critical thinking and decision making life skills.

  • Indicators: # of youth participating in programs who report an increase in science knowledge, problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making skills.

 

Forestry Camp and collaboration



  • Collaborating Partners:  MI Conservation Districts, USDA Forest Service, MDNR, GMI, MSU Forestry Department

  • Timeframe:  Ongoing throughout the year

  • Role: MSUE Science team serves as the lead in youth development and Natural resources with GMI, Julie Crick providing Forestry Expertise in the development of  4-H Forestry Camp and instructor and student camp resources.  Additional support and resources are offered by numerous organizations striving to educate Michigan’s youth.

  • Delivery methods: Face-to-face trainings; Hands-on train-the-trainer sessions.

  • Output: Science literacy workshops, events, activities and educational contests for youth.

    • 2 camps reaching 80 youth

  • Audience: Youth ages 5 through 19.

  • Outcomes: Youth increase science knowledge and learn problem solving, critical thinking and decision making life skills.

  • Indicators: # of youth participating in programs who report an increase in science knowledge, problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making skills.

 

4-H Animal and Veterinary Science Camp and collaboration



  • Collaborating Partners:  MSU College of Veterinary Medicine, MSU Department of Animal Science, Michigan Milk Producers Association

  • Timeframe:  Ongoing throughout the year

  • Role: MSUE Science team serves as the lead in youth development and veterinary science. Additional support and resources are offered by numerous organizations striving to educate Michigan’s youth.

  • Delivery methods:Face-to-face trainings; Hands-on train-the-trainer sessions.

  • Output: Science literacy workshops, events, activities and educational contests for youth.

    • 1 camps reaching 50 youth

  • Audience: Youth ages 13 to 16.

  • Outcomes: Youth increase science knowledge and learn problem solving, critical thinking and decision making life skills.

  • Indicators: # of youth participating in programs who report an increase in science knowledge, problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making skills.

 

Renewable Energy Camp and collaboration



  • Collaborating Partners:  AABI, MI Conservation Districts, Consumers Energy, Corn Marketing Group of Michigan, Tri-County Electric Cooperative / HomeWorks, Michigan Soybean Promoters

  • Timeframe:  Camp in July, planning, preparation and evaluation ongoing throughout the year

  • Workgroup Staff: Insa Raymond, Tracy D’Augustino

  • Role: MSUE Science team serves as the lead in youth development and Renewable & Sustainable Energy with AABI. Additional support and resources are offered by numerous organizations striving to educate Michigan’s youth.

  • Delivery methods: face to face trainings, hands-on train the trainer sessions.

  • Output: Science literacy workshops, events, activities and educational contests for youth.

    • 1 camp reaching 45 youth

  • Audience: Youth ages 13 through 19.

  • Outcomes: Youth increase science knowledge and learn problem solving, critical thinking and decision making life skills.

  • Indicators: # of youth participating in programs who report an increase in science knowledge, problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making skills.

 

Professional Development Related to this Logic Model:



  • National 4-H Conference:  representatives of the science team will attend and will share relevant information with the team.  Members serving NAE4-HA Taskforces will share information with team.

  • National 4-H Science trainings:  Members of the Science Work Team will participate in the webinars provided by National 4-H and other Land Grant Universities offered throughout the year on fund development, curriculum and evaluation as it pertains to science education.

  • Local, state and national trainings around core competencies and related content:  All staff will actively seek and share opportunities to learn and enhance proficiencies related to their area of work.

  • North Central Science team Liaison: Science team will continue to share information with the North Central Science team.

  • Fall Extension Conference: Science Team members will attend Fall Extension Conference and offer sessions as appropriate.

  • CYI Spring Conference: Science Team members will attend the CYI Spring Conference and offer sessions as appropriate.

Evaluation Overview:

To evaluate the Science Team's efforts toward achieving the identified outputs and ultimately the desired outcomes, evaluation efforts will be focused on numerous types of science events and trainings throughout the state lead by both Science Team members and all Michigan 4-H staff.  The evaluation tool will use items listed in Common Measures, which have been tested and validated by National 4-H Council.  The evaluation was updated for 2016, but will continue to evolve after this first year to better capture the outcomes achieved by both youth and adults in science literacy.  A new adult/volunteer evaluation will be created and ready in 2017.  Common Measures is in the process of being redesigned and the Michigan science literacy evaluation will be updated once the new instrument is available from National 4-H Council.  Evaluation can be tailored to a specific event by including additions questions, but the Common Measures statements and scales will be common to all science evaluations used in Michigan.

 

Evaluations and the protocols on how and when to use them are available on SharePoint: Preparing Children and Youth for the Future/ Science Education -



https://sp.anr.msu.edu/sites/Chldnyth/ScienceEducation/_layouts/15/start.aspx#/default.aspx

 

Data will be managed, analyzed and reported in an annual Science Team Impacts Report and posted on SharePoint.



Related files:

  • PLAN6003CYI-05-2017-2019 Science Team POW 9-28-16.docx

    • Original plan: CYI-07-Science

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