Outcome 4: Enhanced employability and acquisition of labour market skills and knowledge and participation in society through direct financial support and funding of employment and training services



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DEEWR Budget Statements – Outcomes and performance – Outcome 4

Outcome 4: Enhanced employability and acquisition of labour market skills and knowledge and participation in society through direct financial support and funding of employment and training services.

Outcome 4 strategy


Skills development and employment participation are key to Australia’s future productivity and economic prosperity. Investment in ongoing skills development, particularly in the resources sector, will ensure that Australians have the skills needed to obtain and sustain meaningful employment and this will be good for Australia as higher skills mean higher productivity and a higher Gross Domestic Product.

The longer term challenges of an ageing population, combined with the more immediate risk of skills shortages and other capacity constraints, mean that it is increasingly important that the entire working age population is encouraged and assisted to participate in the labour market and to upgrade and expand their skills to enable them to take advantage of opportunities in new industries and markets.

The national employment services system, Job Services Australia, is the gateway for job seekers to access training, skills development and work experience, as well as tailored case management and other assistance, to help them to find and maintain employment. Targeted employment assistance, such as Disability Employment Services and the Indigenous Employment Program, offers individually tailored and comprehensive services to assist job seekers with particular needs or barriers to employment to achieve sustainable employment outcomes.

The Government’s employment services and programs are underpinned by the income support system and job seeker compliance framework which support the goal of maximising employment and productivity.

In addition, a number of social inclusion initiatives provide opportunities for individuals who are experiencing disadvantage to participate socially and economically. These include activities under the National Mental Health and Disability Employment Strategy, more flexible participation arrangements for principal carer parents receiving income support and the Family Centred Employment Project, a demonstration project that will provide a family-centred approach to supporting increased employment participation.

To ensure that the most vulnerable are provided with strong support to increase their economic participation as the economy recovers, the department is participating in a taskforce which will trial initiatives aimed at streamlining and better targeting government service delivery for job seekers.

The department provides labour market and related advice on temporary and permanent migration arrangements, to ensure the arrangements contribute to the supply of skilled labour necessary to improve the productive capacity of the Australian economy.

The department is implementing the Pacific Seasonal Worker Pilot Scheme that was announced by the Government in August 2008. The scheme is a small-scale pilot to examine whether a seasonal worker program could contribute to economic development in Pacific Island countries, while benefiting Australian horticulture employers who cannot source sufficient local labour.


Office of Employment Coordinator


Through the Office of Employment Coordinator, the department will continue to focus on groups, industries and regions that have been impacted by the economic downturn and continue to be impacted during recovery. This includes young people, the long-term unemployed, and retrenched workers.

Priority areas

On 5 April 2009, Prime Minister the Hon Kevin Rudd MP, announced support for regions identified as hardest hit by the economic downturn. This strong focus by the Government on supporting jobs at the regional and local level—the Priority Area Strategy—will continue through the work of Local Employment Coordinators in 20 designated priority employment areas until June 2011.

In line with the recommendations in the interim and final Keep Australia Working reports, Local Employment Coordinators will work with the Keep Australia Working Advisory Committee in their respective region to implement a regional employment plan.

Compact with Retrenched Workers


The department will continue its work under the Compact with Retrenched Workers through to 31 March 2011 to assist redundant workers and workers who lost their jobs due to the global recession to get early access to personalised employment services with a Job Services Australia provider.

Table 2.4A Budgeted expenses and resources for Outcome 4

Note: Departmental Appropriation splits and totals are indicative estimates and may change in the course of the budget year as government priorities change.

Contributions to Outcome 4


Program 4.1 Employment Services

Program objective


Workforce participation remains a key component of the Government’s productivity agenda as a driver of long-term economic growth. In support for the recovery from the impacts of the global recession, ongoing support of working age Australians continues through employment services.

The employment services objectives include:



  • investing in the skills unemployed Australians need for the future to help them find and keep a job

  • ensuring that Government assistance supports workforce participation and economic and social inclusion.

Job Services Australia began on 1 July 2009 and delivers a streamlined and more personalised service to job seekers that enables providers to more effectively respond to changing economic conditions. Job Services Australia provides job seekers with tailored services to equip them with the skills and attributes to meet employers’ needs and emerging skills or labour shortages.

The effectiveness of the employment services is measured by monitoring the proportion of job seekers in employment, education and training and off-benefits following assistance by the service, and conversely, the proportion of job seekers found to be failing to comply with their participation obligations without good reason.

A further measure of effectiveness is provided through broader indicators as follows:


  • trend in the average duration (in weeks) of unemployment relative to labour market performance

  • comparative labour market experience (measured as average duration in weeks on full-rate unemployment allowance) and proportion of job seekers off-benefit three months following participation in employment services for each of the following groups:

  • long-term unemployed

  • very long-term unemployed

  • mature-aged

  • people of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds

  • young people

  • Indigenous peoples

  • people with disability

  • sole parents.

  • proportion of population of workforce age on working age income support payment:

  • full rate

  • part rate.

  • by building a workforce that is trained and highly skilled, there will be an increase in economic growth and improved living standards.

Local Employment Coordinators in priority employment areas will continue to coordinate and drive local responses to job losses and declining economic demand in targeted areas, and maximise the impact of the Australian Government’s fiscal stimulus package.

The flexibility of the Job Services Australia model has enabled major government reforms to be incorporated into the employment services model. These reforms include the Closing the Gap Strategy, Compact with Young Australians and the Compact with Retrenched Workers.



Administered items

  • Job Services Australia—assists unemployed individuals to obtain the skills they need to secure sustainable employment. Employment services providers help all eligible job seekers build linkages with employers, connect job seekers to appropriate skills development opportunities and build linkages with other key stakeholders.

  • The Innovation Fund is a component of Jobs Services Australia and a grants program designed to address the needs of the most disadvantaged job seekers through funding projects that will foster innovative solutions to overcome barriers to employment which these job seekers face. The fund seeks to develop solutions for disadvantaged job seekers that will ultimately lead to obtaining and sustaining employment. The Government has provided $41 million over three years to fund projects.

  • The Employer Brokers are a component of Jobs Services Australia. The Australian Government has provided $6 million over three years to fund Employer Broker activities which include engaging with employers in a skill or labour shortage industry, or a specific location, to broker solutions that meet employers’ needs and to coordinate and target the efforts of employment services providers to matching the needs of job seekers with the labour requirements of employers.

  • Job Capacity Assessment—work capacity assessment for people with disability and other barriers to work. Job Capacity Assessors assess and refer people to appropriate employment services and provide reports that inform Centrelink decisions, for example on Disability Support Pension entitlements. On 30 June 2011, the contracted Job Capacity Assessment service will cease to operate. Future assessments will be completed by Centrelink with assistance from the Australian Government service provider, Commonwealth Rehabilitation Service.

  • Jobs Fund is an initiative that supports and creates jobs and increases skills through innovative projects that build community infrastructure and increase social capital in local communities across the country. Through the Jobs Fund the Government invests in one-off capital projects and provides seed funding for social enterprises. The Jobs Fund consists of three streams:

  • Local Jobs— for community infrastructure projects that focus on the promotion of environment-friendly technology and heritage. It consists of $60 million for heritage-related projects appropriated to DEWHA; $40 million for the construction of bike paths appropriated to DITRDLG; and the remaining funds are appropriated to DEEWR.

  • Get Communities Working—for self-sustaining projects which create jobs and provide activities and services to improve community amenity. Of this, $11 million is for Temporary Financial Assistance to non-profit organisations whose donor base was under pressure due to the economic downturn.

  • Infrastructure Employment Projects—funding appropriated to DITRDLG to provide for investment in infrastructure projects which generate jobs in regions affected by the economic downturn.

Initiatives under the Jobs Fund include:

  • Apprentice Kickstart Package—up to $80 million Apprentice Kickstart Bonus for employers of Australian Apprentices undertaking training in skills shortages trades, and $20 million to increase pre-apprenticeship training opportunities.

  • $16.9 million ($15.4 million from the DEEWR appropriation and $1.5 million from the DITRDLG appropriation) to support the Australian Government’s contribution to the Victorian bushfire recovery.

  • $11.5 million to support insulation workers affected by the changes to the Home Insulation program.

  • $10 million to support the development of five youth centres in Priority Employment Areas as part of the Australian Government’s strategy for young Australians.

  • $4.1 million to support Centrelink in running additional Jobs Expos in Priority Employment Areas.

  • The National Green Jobs Corps ($77.2 million over three years) commenced on 1 January 2010. It is a 26-week environmental training program which assists young job seekers (aged 17-24 years) to prepare for employment in emerging green and climate change industries through a range of skill development activities, accredited training and work experience.

  • The Productive Ageing Package ($43.2 million over five years) is designed to help mature age Australians remain engaged in the labour market and to encourage the transfer of their skills to younger generations. The package includes:

  • Career Renewal—Job Retention—$18.8 million to help mature age workers stay in employment and to support skills transfer.

  • Career Renewal—Career Transition—$23.4 million to help mature age workers transition to new employment through Job Services Australia and through professional career advice.

  • Consultative Forum on Mature Age Participation and research—$1 million to provide advice on practical strategies to remove the barriers to employment for mature age people.

Table 2.4.1 Administered expenses and key performance indicators for

Program 4.1






2009–10 Revised budget

2010–11 Budget

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

Quantity for key deliverables

Job Services Australia

Total job placements achieved

450,000

450,000

450,000

450,000

450,000

Program effectiveness indicators

Job Services Australia

Cost per employment outcome for Employment Services delivered by Job Services Australia:




  • Stream 1-3

$4,000

$4,000

$4,000

$4,000

$4,000

  • Stream 4

$17,300

$17,300

$17,300

$17,300

$17,300

Proportion of job seekers in employment three months following participation in Employment Services




  • Stream 1

55%

55%

55%

55%

55%

  • Stream 2

38%

38%

38%

38%

38%

  • Stream 3

25%

25%

25%

25%

25%

  • Stream 4

13%

13%

13%

13%

13%

Proportion of job seekers in education/training three months following participation in Employment Services:




  • Stream 1

10%

10%

10%

10%

10%

  • Stream 2

10%

10%

10%

10%

10%

  • Stream 3

12%

12%

12%

12%

12%

  • Stream 4

12%

12%

12%

12%

12%


Table 2.4.1 Administered expenses and key performance indicators for

Program 4.1 (continued)




2009–10 Revised budget

2010–11 Budget

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

Proportion of job seekers off benefit three months following participation in Employment Services:




  • Stream 1

55%

55%

55%

55%

55%

  • Stream 2

40%

40%

40%

40%

40%

  • Stream 3

35%

35%

35%

35%

35%

  • Stream 4

15%

15%

15%

15%

15%

Proportion of job seekers off benefit twelve months following participation in Employment Services:




  • Stream 1

NA

NA

70%

70%

70%

  • Stream 2

NA

NA

60%

60%

60%

  • Stream 3

NA

NA

55%

55%

55%

  • Stream 4

NA

NA

20%

20%

20%

Proportion of Stream 4 commencements that obtain a social outcome

NA

50%

50%

50%

50%



Program 4.2 Indigenous Employment

Program objective


To increase Indigenous Australians’ employment outcomes and participation in economic activities, contributing to the Government’s commitment to halve the gap in Indigenous and non-Indigenous employment outcomes within the decade.

The reformed Indigenous Employment Program (IEP) commenced on 1 July 2009 following extensive public consultation. The program offers a range of assistance focused on employment, training, aspiration building, business support and other assistance to complement the currently available employment services available under Job Services Australia and Disability Employment Services which are the largest provider of employment services for Indigenous Australians.



  • Assistance under the IEP is available through tailored employment and economic development and business support, and through pre-designed assistance.

  • Tailored assistance is delivered through the department either by directly funding employers, Indigenous businesses or individuals, or purchasing services from organisations on the Employment Panel and the Economic Development and Business Support Panel.

  • Predesigned assistance includes streamlined access to wage subsidies, cadetship support and the new CDEP Work Experience Scheme.

  • The Aboriginal Employment Service is also funded under the IEP.

  • The Australian Employment Covenant is a private sector initiative and is supported by funding through the IEP. It has an objective of securing 50,000 jobs for Indigenous Australians.

  • The Public Sector Initiative is a new initiative commencing on 1 July 2010. It will support the Commonwealth Public Sector to meet the Public Sector Indigenous employment targets set under the National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Economic Participation.

Administered items

Indigenous employment—to assist Indigenous peoples to obtain employment and also start a business, as well as supporting communities to develop their own economic direction.



Table 2.4.2 Administered expenses and key performance indicators for

Program 4.2






2009–10 Revised budget

2010–11 Budget

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

Quantity for key deliverables

Indigenous Employment

Number of total commencements in Indigenous Employment programs (includes commencements in employment, training and other assistance)

25,000

27,500

30,000

32,500

32,500

Number of employment commencements in Indigenous employment programs

12,500

14,000

16,000

18,000

18,000

Program effectiveness indicators

Proportion of job seekers in employment and/or education/training (positive outcomes) three months following participation in Indigenous Employment programs

60%

65%

65%

65%

65%




Program 4.3 Disability Employment Services

Program objective


The new Disability Employment Services commenced on 1 March 2010, following a comprehensive review of the previous open employment programs for people with disability—Disability Employment Network and Vocational Rehabilitation Services. The objective of Disability Employment Services is to help individuals with injury, disability or health condition to secure and maintain sustainable employment. The program operates under the terms of the Disability Services Act 1986.

The new services focus on the needs of job seekers, with an increased emphasis on employment, skills development, education and training. Service providers will assess the impact that a participant’s injury, disability or health condition has on their ability to find and retain a job, and provide individually tailored assistance to job seekers so that they can achieve sustainable outcomes. Where required, Disability Employment Services will offer ongoing support in the workplace to help participants to retain their employment.

To support better transitions from school to work, the definition of an Eligible School Leaver for Disability Employment Services will be extended from 1 July 2010 to include young people with disability who access state government transition to work programs before entering Disability Employment Services, or who access specialist employment assistance within 12 months of leaving school. An additional loading will also apply on selected fees available to help school leavers and other job seekers with moderate intellectual disability secure sustainable and substantive work in the open labour market. Both measures will operate for a two year trial period to test their impact on job placement and employment retention.

Administered items

Disability Employment Services (commenced 1 March 2010)—offers two demand driven programs to help people with disability, injury or health condition to find employment:



  • Disability Management Service provides services to eligible job seekers with temporary or permanent disability, injury, or health condition who require the assistance of a disability employment service and who may require flexible ongoing support but are not expected to need regular, long-term support in the workplace.

  • Employment Support Service is available to those eligible job seekers with permanent disability who are assessed as needing regular long-term ongoing support in the workplace.

  • A Capacity Building Fund will provide assistance to eligible Disability Employment Services providers to purchase professional assistance to improve services to job seekers.

Employment Assistance and Other Services—comprises two elements:

  • Employer Incentives includes the Workplace Modifications Scheme, Supported Wage System, Wage Subsidy Scheme, Auslan for Employment program and the National Disability Recruitment Coordinator service—aims to improve access to employment for people with disability.

  • Disability Employment Network—was subsumed into the new Disability Employment Services program from 1 March 2010.

Vocational Rehabilitation Services—was subsumed into the new Disability Employment Services program from 1 March 2010.

Table 2.4.3 Administered expenses and key performance indicators for

Program 4.3






2009–10 Revised budget

2010–11 Budget

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

Quantity for key deliverables

Disability Employment Services

Utilisation of program capacity




Number of commencements



80,000

80,000

80,000

80,000

Program effectiveness indicator

Proportion of job seekers in employment, education or training three months following participation in employment assistance phase



35%

35%

35%

35%

Employment Assistance and Other Services—Employer Incentives and other services

Utilisation of program capacity




  • Other Disability Employment assistance and services including—Employer Incentives Strategy, Wage Subsidy Scheme, Supported Wage System, Workplace Modifications Scheme, Auslan for Employment Program (instances of service)

12,000

12,000

12,000

12,000

12,000

  • National Disability Recruitment Coordinator

500

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

Table 2.4.3 Administered expenses and key performance indicators for

Program 4.3 (continued)




2009–10 Revised budget

2010–11 Budget

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

1Former disability employment programs

Employment Assistance and Other Services—Disability Employment Network

Utilisation of program capacity




  • Disability Employment Network




  • Capped

16,500

NA

  • Uncapped

12,400

NA

Vocational Rehabilitation Services

Number of commencements

27,000

NA

Quality

Proportion of job seekers referred to demand driven Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) who commence

85%

NA

Proportion of job seekers referred to fixed place VRS who commence

74%

NA

Program effectiveness indicators

The proportion of DEN job seekers who received assistance during
2008–09 that achieve a sustainable employment outcome in:




  • The capped stream

34%

NA

24%

NA

Proportion of job seekers in VRS, in jobs, who go on to achieve a 13 week employment outcome

68%

NA

Proportion of job seekers in employment 3 months following participation in VRS

32%

NA



Program 4.4 Working Age Payments

Program objective


Working age payments support people to improve their prospects of gaining employment, acquire labour market skills and knowledge, and participate in society. Financial assistance is provided to people who are unemployed, looking for work, undertaking employment preparation programs, have parenting responsibilities, have a partial capacity to work due to disability, or young people studying towards a Year 12 or equivalent education attainment.

The effectiveness of working age payments is measured by monitoring and analysing payment trends to assess the duration on income support.



Administered items

  • Mobility Allowance—is a non-means tested income supplement for people with disability who are unable to use public transport without substantial assistance.

  • Newstart Allowance—provides income support for eligible job seekers aged between 21 years and age pension age. Recipients must satisfy an activity test by seeking and accepting suitable work and participating in activities designed to improve their employment prospects.

  • Parenting Payment—provides income support for the principal carer of a child aged under six years if the carer is partnered or under eight years if the carer is single.

  • Partner Allowance—provides assistance to mature age people who are partners of income support recipients and who face difficulty gaining employment due to a lack of recent workforce experience. This allowance was closed to new claimants on 20 September 2003.

  • Pensioner Education Supplement—is a fortnightly payment to certain income support recipients who are participating in approved full- or part-time study.

  • Sickness Allowance—is an income support payment for people aged 21 and over but under age pension age who are temporarily incapacitated for work or study as a result of illness or injury, are unable to work or study, and have a job or course of study to return to.

  • Utilities Allowance—is a supplement paid to eligible income support recipients of Widow Allowance and Partner Allowance to assist with their household bills.

  • Widow Allowance—provides income support for older working age women who no longer have a partner and have no recent workforce experience. This allowance is being phased out and eligibility is limited to women born on or before 1 July 1955.

  • Compensation and debt relief—provides access for eligible recipients to discretionary payments in special circumstances or financial relief from amounts owing to the Commonwealth.

  • Youth Allowance (other)—is an income support payment available to eligible young people aged 16-20 years who may be required to seek or prepare for paid employment or, until they attain a Year 12 or an equivalent Certificate II qualification, undertake study or training in combination with other approved activities.

Table 2.4.4 Administered expenses and key performance indicators for

Program 4.4






2009–10

Revised

budget

2010–11 Budget

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2Program effectiveness indicators

Average (mean) duration on income support by current income support payment (weeks):




  • Newstart Allowance (NSA)

159

NA

NA

NA

NA

  • Youth Allowance (Other) (YA(O))

74

NA

NA

NA

NA

  • Parenting Payment Single (PPS)

357

NA

NA

NA

NA

Percentage of income support recipients who exit income support within 3 months of grant:




  • Newstart Allowance (NSA)

29

NA

NA

NA

NA

  • Youth Allowance (Other) (YA(O))

28

NA

NA

NA

NA

Percentage of income support recipients who exit income support within 12 months of grant:




  • Newstart Allowance (NSA)

68

NA

NA

NA

NA

  • Youth Allowance (Other) (YA(O))

70

NA

NA

NA

NA




Program 4.5 Compensation Payments



Program objective

  • Safety Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 s90D is appropriated for the purposes of Comcare’s Outcome 2. “An early and safe return to work and access to compensation for injured workers covered by the Comcare scheme through working in partnership with employers to create best practice in rehabilitation and quick and accurate management of workers’ compensation claims.”

  • To increase the rate of durable return to work

  • To provide consistent access to workers’ compensation.

  • Asbestos related claims Act 2005 – s8(2) is appropriated for the purposes of Comcare’s Outcome 3. “Access to compensation for people with asbestos related diseases where the Commonwealth has a liability through management of claims.”

  • To manage primary asbestos disease claims in an efficient and equitable manner and in accordance with the order of priority set out in Comcare’s Policy Statement.

  • To pay compensation in a timely manner once a Court / Tribunal Order is made.

  • To recover contributions to compensation payments from third parties which. In turn, should contribute to the preservation of funds available for future compensation payments to primary claimants who have an asbestos related disease.



Program 4.5 expenses

  • The special appropriation Safety, Rehabilitation & Compensation Act 1988-s90D refers specifically to those claims accepted prior to the establishment of Comcare’s premium scheme in 1989. The cost of these claims is funded from Consolidated Revenue and will continue to reduce as no new cases are added and old cases are resolved and closed.

  • Asbestos Related Claims Act 2005 – s8(2) special appropriation is used to pay lump sum claim compensation payments that arise from court awarded costs in relation to Asbestos related disease matters.



Program 4.5 Components

  • Comcare Outcome 2 Management of pre premium Claims

  • Comcare Outcome 3 Management of common law asbestos claims.



Program 4.5 Deliverables

  • Relevant and accurate information provided to employers and employees under the Comcare scheme supporting effective return to work and appropriate access to compensation.

  • Management of claims matters determined by Comcare that are the subject of review by the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.

  • Management of asbestos related claims liabilities consistently and in accordance with any relevant legislation or Australian Government policies.

  • To provide an accurate data set and other information about asbestos claims liabilities to Comcare’s external actuary and the Australian National Audit Office to enable the future projected liabilities to be valued accurately for Comcare’s annual report.




Program 4.5 Key Performance Indicators

  • Comcare will comply with the Legal Services Directions, the management objectives contained in the Asbestos Litigation Policy Statement and any Court/Tribunal Rules/Orders in respect of all asbestos related disease claims.

  • The data Comcare provides to its external actuaries for the purpose of the annual actuarial assessment is materially accurate.



Outcome 4 departmental outputs

Social policy


Key departmental social policy priorities for 2010–11 are:

  • Meeting commitments in relation to the Government’s homelessness agenda through the department’s programs and services to those who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. The department will continue to support whole of government policy development and implementation through processes such as the Homelessness Delivery Review Board.

  • Identification of strategies for improving the participation of jobless families. The Family-Centred Employment Project is a demonstration project that will be delivered in three locations across Australia to provide a new approach to support families in which the adults are unemployed and to address barriers to education and employment participation.

  • Implementation and extension to 30 June 2011 of the School Enrolment and Attendance Measure, working closely with Centrelink, FaHCSIA and the relevant state and territory governments.

  • Cross-portfolio policy development regarding: people with disability, including mental illness; ex-offenders; people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and women.

  • Building on the department’s research, analysis and evaluation functions, to support the social policy agenda through management and development of a rich evidence base.

Table 2.4B: Performance information for Outcome 4 departmental outputs

Performance indicator

2010–11 estimate

Program Management

Employment IT applications: defect density for important defect types is measured by the mean defect from the International Software Benchmarking Standards Group (ISBSG) repository of major defects.

Benchmark: Mean defect density (major severity) = 15 defects per 1,000 function points (to be measured four weeks after software release)

Employment IT applications services—construction and redevelopment of internally developed software.

Cost benchmark is $1,250 per function point. Target is $1,250 or less

Employment IT applications availability.

Target is 99.5%

Services provided by Australian Government agencies (e.g. Centrelink) satisfy performance requirements.

DEEWR requirements met

Payments to providers made in accordance with agreed approved timelines.

Payments meet relevant administrative targets contractual timeframes assessed by quality assurance processes in DEEWR

Payments to providers are based on calculations which are accurate and in accordance with approved guidelines.

Payments meet relevant administrative targets contractual requirements assessed by quality assurance processes in DEEWR

Provision of employment outcome results through the Post-Program Monitoring survey.

Results available within a satisfactory timeframe

Client Satisfaction

Level of satisfaction of service providers with contracted information and support.

80 per cent satisfied

High quality advice as measured by the level of satisfaction by Commonwealth public sector agencies and organisations

Qualitative evaluation of satisfaction using feedback from Commonwealth Public Sector agencies and organisations



1 Disability Employment Network and Vocational Rehabilitation Services were subsumed into the new Disability Employment Services program commencing 1 March 2010. Figures for these programs are for eight months to 28 February 2010.

2 Estimates for out years are not available due to the change in the recipient population in the context of the global recession.



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