Curriculum vitae name: david j. Grdina

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II. PEER REVIEWED CHAPTERS

148. Grdina, D.J. Separation of Clonogenic Cells from Stationary Phase Cultures and a Murine Fibrosarcoma by Density Gradient Centrifugation. In Methods in Cell Biology, Vol. 14, Chapter 20. D.M. Precott, ed. New York, New York: Academic Press, Inc., 1976, pp. 213-228.


149. Meistrich, M.L., D.J. Grdina, and R.E. Meyn. Application of Cell Separation Methods to the Study of Cell Kinetics and Proliferation. In Growth Kinetics and Biochemical Regulation of Normal and Malignant Cells. B. Drewinko and R.M. Humphrey, eds., pp. 131-142, Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, Maryland, 1977.
150. Grdina, D.J. Variations in Radiation Response of Tumor Subpopulations. In: Radiation Biology in Cancer Research. R.E. Meyn and H.R. Withers, eds., Raven Press, pp. 353-363, New York, 1980.
151. Meyn, R.E., D.J. Grdina, and S.E. Fletcher. Repair of Radiation Damage in vivo. In: Radiation Biology in Cancer Research. R.E. Meyn and H.R. Withers, eds., Raven Press, New York, pp. 95- 102, 1980.
152. Grdina, D.J., and M.L. Meistrich. Separation of Solid Tumor Cell Populations. In Antibiotics and Chemotherapy, Design and Cancer Chemotherapy, Vol. 28. E. Mihich and S. Eckhardt, eds., Vol, 28, pp. 137-141, Basel: S. Karger AG Medical Publishers, 1980.
153. Grdina, D.J. Radiation Biology of Tumor Subpopulations. In Radiation Biology, Vol. VI, within the CRC Uniscience Series: Radiotracers in Biology and Medicine. D.J. Pizzarello, ed., pp. 129-148, CRC Press, New York, 1982.
154. Grdina, D.J., M.L. Meistrich, R.E. Meyn, T.S. Johnson, and R.A. White. Cell Synchrony Techniques, A Comparison of Methods. In Techniques in Cell Cycle Analysis, Chapter 12. J.E. Gray and Z. Darzynkiewicz, eds. Clifton, New Jersey: The Humana Press, Inc., 1986, pp. 367-402.
155. Grdina, D.J. and C.P. Sigdestad. Radiation Protectors: The Unexpected Benefits. Drug Metabolism Reviews, 20:13-42, 1989.
156. Vaughan, A.T.M., D.J. Gordon, D.J. Grdina, and A.E. Milner. Analysis of Radiation and Chemical Damage in Mammalian Cells. In Flow Cytometry: A Practical Approach, M.G. Ormerod, ed. IRL Press, Oxford. Chap. 10, pp. 229-240, 1990.
157. Grdina, D.J., B. Nagy, and P.J. Meechan. Effect of an Aminothiol (WR1065) on Radiation-Induced Mutagenesis and Cytotoxicity in Two Repair-deficient Mammalian Cell Lines. In Anticarcinogenesis and Radiation Protection: Strategies in Protection from Radiation and Cancer, O. Nygaard, ed., pp. 287-295, Plenum Publishing Corp. New York, 1991.
158. Nagy, B., D.J. Grdina, and C.R. Ashman. JANUS Neutron Irradiation of a Mouse Cell Line Containing a Shuttle Vector Plasmid. In Anticarcinogenesis and Radiation Protection: Strategies in Protection from Radiation and Cancer, O. Nygaard, ed., pp. 85-92, Plenum Publishing Corporation, New York, 1991.
159. Basic, I., D.J. Grdina, and T. Lyons. Application of an In Vivo Mutagenesis System to Assess Aminothiol Effects on Neutron-induced Genotoxic Damage in Mouse Splenocytes. In Anticarcinogenesis and Radiation Protection: Strategies in Protection from Radiation and Cancer, O. Nygaard, ed. Plenum Publishing Corporation, New York, New York, pp. 297-301, 1991.

160.


Murley, J.S. and D.J. Grdina. Chemoprevention with WR-2721 and its Metabolites. In:

Radioprotectors, CRC Press, E. Bump and K Malaker eds., New York, New York, pp. 299- 313, 1998.
161. Grdina, D.J, Y. Kataoka, and J.S. Murley. Amifostine: Mechanisms of Action Underlying

Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention. Drug Metabolism and Drug Interactions, 16 (No. 4):1-43, 2002.

162. Little, J.B., D.J. Grdina. Ionizing Radiation, In: Cancer 7 Medicine, Chapter 16, Holland-Frei Eds.,

B.C. Decker Inc., Hamilton, Ontario, CA, pp. 270-282, 2006.

163. Grdina, D.J., Ionizing Radiation, In: Cancer 8 Medicine, Chapter 16, Holland-Frei Eds., B.C. Decker Inc., Hamilton, Ontario, CA. 2009.
164. Murley, J.S., Y. Kataoka, D.J. Grdina. Amifostine and the Endogenous Cellular Antioxidant Enzyme Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Radioprotection. In: Oxidative Stress in Clinical Practice, Humana Press/Springer Science. Pp. 149-168, 2011.

III. MISCELLANEOUS
165. Grdina, D.J. Physiologically-Induced Changes in the Repair of Gamma-Ray-Induced Single-Strand Breaks in Escherichia coli K-12. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, 1971.
166. Basic, I., L. Milas, D.J. Grdina, and H.R. Withers. In vitro Destruction of Tumor Cells by Murine Macrophages Stimulated with Corynebacterium granulosum. Periodicum Biologorum, 78:134-136, 1976. (Proceedings of the Yugoslav Immunological Society.)

167. Grdina, D.J. Research Sheds Light on Chemicals that Protect Against Radiation, Logos, 4:2-5, 1986.


168. Grdina, D.J. Molecular Mechanisms in Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention with ETHYOL

(amifostine). Pro ED COMMUNICATIONS, INC. Pub., Beachwood, Ohio, 1997.



INVITED LECTURES:
1. Radiation sensitivity of tumor cell populations separated from a fibrosarcoma by density gradient centrifugation. Duke University, North Carolina, September 16, 1974.
2. Comparative studies of the radiation sensitivity of tumor cell populations separated from a solid tumor. Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, October 21, 1974.
3. Separation of hypoxic cells from a solid tumor. University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, December 29, 1975.
4. Tumor radiobiology: A study of the cellular parameters of density, size, and DNA content as related to clonogenicity and radiation response. University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, June 8, 1977.
5. Formation of lung metastases: An analysis based on cellular parameters of density, size, and DNA content. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, June 30, 1977.
6. The use of cell separation procedures to study the relationship(s) between density, size, and DNA content of tumor cells and the parameters of clonogenicity and radiation sensitivity. New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, New Mexico, August 8, 1977.
7. Tumor cell separation techniques in experimental chemotherapy and radiotherapy. University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, December 12, 1978.
8. Tumor cell separation techniques in experimental chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, August 22, 1979.
9. Variations in radiation response of tumor subpopulations. The 32nd Annual Symposium on Fundamental Cancer Research, The University of Texas System Cancer Center, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Houston, Texas, February 28, 1979.
10. Variations in the radiation response of tumor subpopulations. Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, June 23, 1980.
11. Tumor heterogeneity and radiation biology. Section of Experimental Radiation Oncology, U.C.L.A., Los Angeles, California, March 2, 1980.
12. Workshop on: Cell separation and tumor cell kinetics. VIII Conference on Analytical Cytology and Cytometry, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, May 21, 1981.
13. Tumor cell separation techniques in experimental chemotherapy and radiotherapy. 1981-1982 Oncology Lecture Series, University of Louisville Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky, November 16, 1981.
14. Comparison of synchrony techniques, invited workshop participant. Cell Kinetics Society, Houston, Texas, March 21, 1982.
15. Tumor cell heterogeneity. Radiation Research Society, Symposium invited speaker, Salt Lake City, Utah, April 21, 1982.
16. Tumor cell heterogeneity. Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, March 15, 1983.
17. Cell separation approaches to tumor heterogeneity. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, September 30, 1983.
18. Tumor heterogeneity and radiation biology: A search for prognostic indicators of tumor response. Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, Baltimore, Maryland, October 25, 1983.
19. Application of cell separation techniques to experimental chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, Baltimore, Maryland, October 26, 1983.
20. Tumor heterogeneity and radiation biology: A search for prognostic indicators of tumor response. Biology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, November 9, 1983.
21. Effects of radioprotectors on cell killing, mutagenesis, and transformation. Dept. of Exp. Radiotherapy, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Houston, Texas, June 27, 1984.
22. Tumor heterogeneity and radiation biology: Department of Biological Sciences, Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, September 10, 1984.
23. Tumor heterogeneity and radiation biology. A search for prognostic indicators of tumor response. Department of Biology, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL, November 1, 1984.
24. Radiation protectors as anticarcinogens. Cleveland Clinic, Dept. of Radiation Biology, Cleveland, Ohio, October 8, 1985.
25. Effects of radiation. Workshop on Recombinant DNA for Beginners, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, July 28, 1986.
26. Cancer prevention: Application of chemicals in treatment therapy to reduce risk in secondary tumor induction. Opportunities in the Oncology Marketplace, The Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, October 15, 1986.
27. The application of radioprotector compounds to reduce the risk of radiation-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. CSUI-ANL Conference, Collaborative Research at DOE National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, October 30, 1986.
28. Application of chemicals in treatment therapy to reduce risk in secondary tumor induction. University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiation Oncology, November 10, 1986.
29. Tumor heterogeneity and radiation biology. University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiation Oncology, January 9, 1987.
30. Radiation damage and protection. Division of Educational Programs, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, February 27, 1987.
31. Radioprotectors in treatment therapy to reduce risk in secondary tumor induction. Perspectives in Radioprotection, AFRRI, Bethesda, Maryland, March 13, 1987.
32. Role of radioprotectors in DNA damage and repair, damage to protein, and effects on cell progression. Perspectives in Radioprotection, AFRRI, Bethesda, Maryland, March 13, 1987.
33. Tumor heterogeneity and radiation biology. Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois, March 20, 1987.
34. Effects of aminothiols on DNA damage, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California, October 5, 1987.
35. The application of radiation protectors in treatment therapy to reduce risk in secondary tumor induction. University of California at San Francisco, California, October 6, 1987.
36. Effects of aminothiols on DNA damage, repair, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, October 16, 1987.
37. The antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effects of selected free radical scavenging aminothiols. 1987 ISSX/SOT Clearwater Symposium, Clearwater, Florida, November 11, 1987.
38. The effects of WR1065 and WR151326 on cell-cycle progression. The Division of Clinical Research in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba-chi, Japan, Feb. 1, 1988.
39. Neutron DNA damage and repair and their modulation by aminothiols. Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, Japan, Feb. 2, 1988.
40. Effect of aminothiols on neutron and gamma-ray-induced DNA damage and repair. NIRS, Chiba-chi, Japan, Feb. 3, 1988.
41. The application of aminothiols as antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic agents in cancer treatment for the prevention of therapy-induced secondary tumors. Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan, Feb. 9, 1988.
42. The effect of aminothiols on DNA damage and repair as a function of radiation quality. Radiation Biophysics Department, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan, Feb. 10, 1988.
43. The effect of radiation quality and the presence of aminothiols on DNA damage and repair. Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan, Feb. 15, 1988.
44. The application of aminothiols to reduce risk of secondary tumors due to radiation and/or chemotherapy. NIRS, Chiba-chi, Japan, Feb. 22, 1988.
45. Use of aminothiols to protect against secondary tumor induction as a result of treatment therapy; and effect of aminothiols on neutron- and gamma-ray-induced DNA damage and repair. Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, Feb. 23, 1988.
46. Antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic properties of WR2721: Application to the clinic. Dept. of Experimental Radiotherapy, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Houston, Texas, Dec. 6, 1988.
47. Antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic properties of aminothiols: Applications to the clinic and the workplace. Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Feb. 2, 1989.
48. Aminothiol mediated antimutagenesis and anticarcinogenesis. Biology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, Feb. 9, 1989.
49. Antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effects of WR2721: Application to the clinic. Grand Rounds, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, March 2, 1989.
50. Antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effects of aminothiols. Radiation Oncology Training Program and Bioengineering Faculty, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, Sept. 27, 1989.
51. Antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effects of aminothiols: Applications to the clinic and workplace. Third International Conference on Anticarcinogenesis and Radiation Protection, Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, Oct. 20, 1989.
52. Aminothiols as antimutagens and anticarcinogens. Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Yugoslavia, Oct. 25, 1989.
53. Antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effects of WR2721 and WR151327. Developmental Therapeutics Branch, Division of AIDS, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland, Dec. 13, 1989.
54. Protection against therapy-induced secondary tumors. Chicago Radiological Society, Chicago, Illinois, April 19, 1990.
55. Protection by WR-2721 against late effects of radiation (gamma rays and neutrons). 28th Cospar Meeting, The Hague, The Netherlands, June 27, 1990.
56. Protection against therapy-induced secondary tumors. The Gray Laboratory, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, England, June 2, 1990.
57. Protection against therapy-induced tumors. The Medical Research Council, Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire, England, June 5, 1990.
58. Use of repair defective mammalian cells and exogenous thiols to study mechanisms of radiation resistance. NCI Radioresistance Workshop, Washington, D.C., Sept. 18, 1990.
59. Protection by WR-151327 against late-effect damage induced by fission-spectrum neutrons. Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, International Colloquium on Neutron Radiation Biology, Rockville, Maryland, Nov. 7, 1990.
60. Antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effects of WR-2721 and WR-151327. Monsanto Chemical Co., St. Louis, Missouri, Dec. 19, 1990.
61. Antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effects of radioprotective aminothiols. Marion Merrell Dow, Cincinnati, Ohio, Jan. 24, 1991.
62. Role of aminothiols in protection against carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, Feb. 20, 1991.
63. Role of aminothiols in carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. Dept. of Experimental Radiotherapy, M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas, Nov. 18, 1991.
64. Chemoprevention by aminothiols in radiation and chemotherapy. University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, Jan. 30, 1992.
65. Cell survival, mutagenesis, and aminothiols. 40th Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society, invited Symposium Speaker, Salt Lake City, Utah, March 18, 1992.
66. Can we provide methods of reducing the risk of cancer and genetic effects? Workshop #2 supporting NASA design study for manned mission to Mars, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, Sept. 22, 1992
67. Use of WR 2721 in chemoprevention. Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, Feb. 3, 1993.
68. Chemo Prevention by WR 2721 and WR 151327. Second International Cancer Chemo Prevention Conference, Berlin, Germany, April 29, 1993.
69. Role of WR 2721 in DNA damage and repair. Basic Science Advisory Committee presentation, U.S. Bioscience, West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, July 15, 1993.
70. Antimutagenic effects of WR-2721 following alkylating agent therapy. Cancer and Leukemia Group B, Clinical Trials, Oak Brook, Illinois, Nov. 3, 1993.
71. Chemoprevention by aminothiols in radiation and chemotherapy. 1st Annual John Yuhas Memorial Lecture, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Nov. 10, 1993.
72. Chemoprevention by aminothiols in radiation and chemotherapy. Northern Illinois University, De Kalb, Illinois, Jan. 21, 1994.
73. Antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effects of WR151327. U.S. Bioscience and the Department of Energy, Washington, DC, August 9, 1994.
74. Chemoprevention by Aminothiols: Biochemical and Molecular Mechanisms. Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, November 17, 1994.
75. Chemoprevention by Aminothiols. Invited Symposium Talk, 43rd Radiation Research Society Meeting, San Jose, California, April 5, 1995.
76. Chemoprevention by Aminothiols: Molecular Mechanisms. Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, April 17, 1995.
77. WR-2721 Protects Against Cytoxan-Induced Mutagenesis at the HPRT Locus without Affecting Therapeutic Effectiveness. Christ Church College, Oxford, United Kingdom, August 23, 1995.
78. Chemoprevention by Amifostine. ECCO-8, Schering Plough, Paris, France, October 30, 1995.
79. Antimutagenicity Effects of Amifostine: Clinical Implications. University of Arizona Cancer Center Workshop, West Palm Beach, Florida, December 8, 1995.
80. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Chemoprotective and -Preventive Properties of Amifostine. Satellite Symposium "Cytoprotection with Amifostine in Tumor Therapy", 22nd German Cancer Congress, Berlin, Germany, February 20, 1996.
81. Aminothiols in Chemoprevention: Molecular Mechanisms of Action. Invited Symposium Talk, 44th Radiation Research Society Meeting, Chicago, Illinois, April 14, 1996.
82. Cytoprotection Educational Forum: Mutagenesis. The Warwick Hotel, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 17, 1996.
83. Molecular Mechanisms of Ethyol in Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention. Recent Advances in Research and Practice in Cytoprotection. Frankfurt, Germany, June 8, 1996.
84. Protection Against Cancer-Therapy Induced Toxicities. Department of Hematology and Oncology, St. Lukes Hospital, New York, New York, June 27, 1996.
85. Protection Against Radiation Induced Mutagenesis and Carcinogenesis by Amifostine and WR151327. D.O.E. Conference on: Use of the Radioprotector Ethyol (Amifostine) for Planned Radiation Exposures During Emergencies, Bethesda, MD, August 15-16, 1996.
86. Molecular Mechanisms of Ethyol in Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention. New Mexico Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Doubletree Hotel, Albuquerque, New Mexico, October 18, 1996.
87. Aminothiols With and Without Radiation Therapy in the Management of Solid Cancers. Southwest Oncology Group Fall Meeting, Gynecologic Cancer Basic Science Subcommittee, Chicago, Illinois, October 19, 1996.
88. Role of Amifostine in Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention: Molecular Mechanisms, University of Illinois at Chicago Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois, February 24, 1997.
89. Protection Against Cancer-Therapy Induced Toxicities, Northern California Kaiser Oncology Pharmacists Quarterly Meeting, Oakland, California, March 11, 1997.
90. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Cytoprotective and Chemopreventive Properties of Ethyol, EORTC Head and Neck Cancer Coorperative Group Meeting, Brussels, Belgium, March 14, 1997.
91. Cytoprotection and Cell Cycle, University of Chicago, Dept. Of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Chicago Illinois, April 15, 1997.
92. Mechanisms Underlying the Cytoprotective and Chemopreventive Properties of Ethyol, Past and Present Role of Ethyol in Cancer Therapy, Ethyol Advisory Board Meeting, Los Angeles, California, May 10, 1997.
93. Mechanisms of Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention by Ethyol, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Chicago, Illinois, May 22, 1997.
94. Mechanisms Underlying the Cytoprotective and Chemopreventive Properties of Ethyol, Past and Present Role of Ethyol in Cancer Therapy, Ethyol Advisory Board Meeting, Tucson, Arizona, May 31, 1997.


  1. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Cytoprotective and Chemopreventive Properties of Ethyol, Cox Health Care Systems, Springfield, Missouri, June 20, 1997.




  1. Mechanisms of Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention by Ethyol, University of Washington,

Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, Washington, January 15, 1998.


  1. Mechanisms in Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention of Ethyol in Radiation Oncology, Ethyol

Advisory Meeting, Tucson, Arizona, March 21, 1998.


  1. Mechanisms in Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention of Ethyol in Radiation Oncology, Ethyol

Advisory Meeting, Los Angeles, California, May 16, 1998.


  1. Mechanisms in Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention of Ethyol in Radiation Oncology,

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, August 11, 1998.


  1. The Use of Radiation and Radionuclides in Animal Research- Basics of Radioactivity,

American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, 49th National Meeting,

Cincinnati, Ohio, October 20, 1998.




  1. Mechanisms of Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention by Ethyol, Northwestern University,

Chicago, Illinois, December 17, 1998.


  1. Mechanisms of Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention by Ethyol in Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chicago, Illinois, January 14, 1999.




  1. Mechanisms of Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention by Ethyol in Radiation Oncology,

Rush Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chicago, Illinois, January 28, 1999.


  1. Mechanisms of Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention by Ethyol in Radiation Oncology,

American College of Radiology, Southwest Meeting, Albuquerque, New Mexico,

February 13, 1999.




  1. Mechanisms of Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention by Ethyol in Radiation Oncology,

Geisinger Medical Center, Accredited through Penn. State University of Continuing

Education, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, March 11, 1999.


106. Underlying Mechanisms of Ethyol for Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention in Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, March 31, 1999.
107. Mechanisms of Cytoprotection and Chemoprevention by Amifostine (Ethyol) in Radiation Biology,

Dutch Radiobiological Society, Haarlem, Netherlands, April 16, 1999.



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